In the series released by Marvel Comics, before the Great War broke out on Cybertron, the robot who would be Optimus Prime, before he received the Matrix of Leadership from Sentinel Prime, was a Transformer of note, displaying his skills in the Infraformers Sharpshooting Competition. When the war began, Prime quickly made a name for himself as a combat leader of the Autobots.
Hero Optimus Prime was the first new-mold Optimus Prime toy in the Generation 2 line. He transforms into a Kenworth truck of unknown model with a flatbed trailer. The truck and trailer form his robot mode, but cannot disconnect. His primary gimmick is an air-powered missile launcher that uses an air bellows attached by hose to launch his large, hollow, soft-rubber-tipped missiles. The bellows and missiles attach to his back in robot mode. His rifle plugs into the launcher's main body in truck mode.

Here is another thing, people complain about the presence of stickers in a LEGO set. I have news for them, stickers keep down the cost of a set. The latest modular building will have stickers with it, but it isn’t the last time a set geared toward adults will have stickers with it. At least LEGO listened to our wishes and got rid of STAMPS (Stickers across multiple pieces). Still that modular will be the only set that will have a red baseplate and printed golden star tiles. Translation, that set will be very hot on the secondary market when it is retired. It is going to be very hard to source out the baseplate if people try to build Palace Cinema by sourcing its parts. (Which is a project some are doing with Cafe Corner and the UCS Falcon)
Available exclusively from Japanese clothing company A Bathing Ape in April 2012, "Convoy Reissue BAPE Ver. BLACK" (コンボイ復刻版 BAPE® Ver. BLACK) is a redeco of the original Optimus Prime toy sporting a unique new grey color scheme, along with a grey trailer decorated with a camouflage pattern. Both trailer and Prime himself feature the A Bathing Ape logo in place of an Autobot symbol, while the floor of the trailer's Combat Deck mode features new Bathing Ape-themed labels. The figure comes in a recolored version of the original Japanese packaging.
In an amusing (but glaring) example of poor quality control in a Takara product, the back of the packaging features a small amount of Engrish, notably the word "kinetic" being written as "Kinetick". The bio also mentions the elemental metal as the "Cyber-Matter" living metal, which is used for the Aligned continuity family. Oddly, TakaraTomy's stock photo of the robot mode figure was later used as a cutout "battle figure" included with Telebi Magazine's Burning Megatron.
When I was a child in the 1960s, I bought most of my own Lego, using money from paper routes I had from the ages of 7-16. But the items I bought we not ‘kits’. They were small boxes of standard bricks. Each box contained only a single shape and colour, but you could find most of the basic shapes 1×1 or 1×2 or 1×4 or 1×8, 2×2 or 2×3 or 2×4, bevels, doors or windows, if you found the right box. The boxes were only 50 cents, and had an average of 12 bricks per box. That works out out to about 4-5 cents per brick. The kits were expensive, but buying the standard boxes was a lot cheaper, and that is what most people did back then. With my paper route, at the age of 7 I could buy 100 pieces per week using my own money. Name any 7 year old that afford to do that now!
Bumblebee - The Transformers live action film franchise's latest installment is out, with Bumblebee hitting theaters last week. The Seibertron.com Twincast / Podcast brings you its review of the movie, with one of its regular podcasters Jon Bailey bringing his insights after providing the voice acting talents for Soundwave and Shockwave in the film. Along with this insider perspective, the cast discusses each significant part of the movie itself, beginning with the "Generation One" inspired opening scene on Cybertron. The new human and robot characters presented in the Earth based adventures are also reflected on, with the cast agreeing that this latest movie is a measurable tonal departure from the approach of previous films in the franchise. After talking through the entire movie's plot and characterizations, speculation about what comes next for Travis Knight, Michael Bay, and the Transformers live action movies comes next. A quick chat about the movie's tie-in toyline follows, and the show concludes with a quick round of holiday season bragging rights about the cast's Transformers related gifts.

The Transformers Energon figure pen is based on Optimus Prime in his standard Energon body. About the size of a scout class toy, he transforms from truck mode to robot mode almost identically to his mainline toys, apart from the fact that his feet contain the pen and cannot bend. It's really hard to write with, and almost impossible to pose, even though it has full arm articulation. Amusingly, this figure can position itself to transform into his super robot mode (by flipping his helmet on, opening his chest and flipping his hands in), but because there are no versions of the Prime Force drones in this scale, it's impossible to complete him.
Nonetheless, I remain a big fan of Lego and although I think they have somewhat moved away from their roots with the excess of licensed products (and the earlier licensed products were, in my opinion, not very good because they contained too many specialized non-generic pieces that weren’t useful for generic building. But that situation is improved and in particular we have found the Star Wars sets to be of most value for generic building, because they generally have very few really specialized pieces (although to be fair the sets are most useful for building other spaceships, etc).
Optimus Prime appears in the prequel novel Transformers: Ghosts of Yesterday, where he and a group of Autobots travel in the Ark searching for the Allspark, battling Starscream's Decepticons along the way. While going through a worm hole, the Autobots find themselves encountering a group of humans in a spacecraft reverse-engineered from studying Megatron. With this discovery, Prime realizes the significance of Earth, as both Megatron and the Allspark are there. After saving Bumblebee from a pit of rock-chewing cave worms, Prime battles Starscream. He is about to be gunned down by Starscream and Bonecrusher when he is saved by the human craft. In retaliation, Starscream obliterates it.
In Axiom Nexus, General Optimus Prime found himself inducted into the Convoy, a group of Optimus Primes and their kin dedicated to safeguarding the multiverse. While the other Convoy members tended to stay in the upper reaches of Axiom Nexus, the General was able to use his unusual appearance for an Optimus Prime to venture in the Offworlder zones without suspicion, a great help to Offworlder Zone Security Administration Commander Cheetor. The General was also assisted in his new mission by his longtime scout, Sergeant Hound. General Optimus Prime profile card Sgt. Hound profile card
In 1986 the Transformers animated movie had been released, and during the run of the movie, through a pamphlet that came with certain figures, you could order certain Transformers through the mail, such as Optimus Prime among other toys. The toys came in a standard brown mailer box, with items, booklet, and a limited Edition Movie certificate and sticker.
In 2016, the figure saw re-release with the Combiner Force packaging. Being the tenth use of the sculpt at this point, some instances of mold deterioration have affected the figure, including: the vehicle front's bumper (which affects the space on the head/front bumper transformation), the headlights, and/or the legs, and the hole on the left shoulder is also prone to develop a stress mark due to the right shoulder's slightly "thickened" peg. Although the re-released badge didn't seem to unlock Optimus Prime after it was scanned, a later update to the game amended this.
Optimus was eventually revived by the Autobots when they arrived to liberate Master from Decepticon hands. They found allies in the native Cyberdroids—those Optimus loyalists who had fought the Malignus insurgency. Autobots and Cyberdroids liberated the deposed triumvirate of Apex, Hi-Q, and Diac. Hoping to check the power-mad Galvatron and his three Cyberdroid allies, the Autobot leader was revived and binary-bonded himself to three Cyberdroids, including Surge, and Apex, who formed his head. Thus empowered, "Triple-Threat Prime" battled Galvatron and his forces across Master in a series of epic conflicts. The Autobots were unsuccessful and were forced to retreat. A Brush With Infamy–Prologue
Available exclusively from Japanese clothing company A Bathing Ape in 2014, MP Convoy Reissue BAPE Ver. is a trailer-less redeco of the MP-10 mold sporting a green color scheme matching the Convoy Reissue BAPE Ver. of the original G1 toy, with "BAPE's famous camouflage pattern" and an ape head print on the shoulder replacing the usual faction symbol.

Prime got his own rap segment. He was seen in his "Combat" toy body, waiting for Megatron as he attacked a human subdivision. Prime converted to robot form, blew up Megatron's weapon at point blank range, and slugged it out with him. Apparently emerging victorious, he was next shown sitting next to an identical truck, which kid mistook for the real thing. The real Prime then transformed and picked up the kid, inspecting the human with his cold, lifeless, flashing red optics. Combat Heroes commercial


Available only at KB Toys, Machine Wars Optimus Prime is a redeco and slight retool of the European Generation 1 exclusive Turbomaster leader Thunder Clash, transforming into a Cybertronic truck cab. It's easy to see why Thunder Clash was chosen to become the new Optimus Prime, given his adherence to Prime tradition: the cab disconnects to become the robot, while the trailer unfolds to become an assault tower with twin missile launchers. On the original Thunder Clash version of the mold, the launchers operated on a gravity-feed system that saw a new missile drop into the launcher from above each time one was fired, allowing for twelve to be fired in rapid succession, but for Machine Wars Prime, this feature had to be dialed back for safety reasons. The missiles had to be lengthened to prevent choking hazards, and so the toy's launchers were modified to accommodate them, becoming straightforward spring-loaded single-firing weapons.

This military-colors redeco of the Auto Roller Dirtbag was planned for late Generation 2 and widely solicited alongside fellow redeco Sargent Hound, but never saw release. Transforming into an "earth mover" dump truck, he has an auto-transforming gimmick activated by rolling his rear wheels; roll forward to go to robot mode, and back to dump truck. A switch on his back end separates the gears of the gimmick, allowing him to roll freely in either mode. In vehicle mode, his missiles can peg onto the front end of the dump-bed for storage. In robot mode, he has a twin spring-loaded missile launcher in his right arm, and a clamping "stun gun" claw on the left.


A golden-chrome redeco of Cybertron Metroplex was offered as a contest prize in the December 2005 issue of TV Magazine, and came with an equally blinged-out Legends/EZ Collection Optimus Prime figure. Fifteen of this set were available as prizes in the initial contest; a single Metroplex was later offered as one of many prizes in a Takara website contest, but this version came only with the standard metallic paint version of Prime.
As with other Dark of the Moon Activators toys, this Optimus Prime (released under the Robo Power subline) is a very simple one-step transformation toy. You simply slam him down on the big blue button on the back end of his truck mode and he transforms thanks to spring-loaded mechanisms. To transform him back, just slam him down again on the same blue button.
Surprisingly, this was also the first Hasbro exclusive transforming Movie Optimus Prime figure to be based on the final design seen in Age of Extinction. He even features the forearms that Prime had before obtaining the Sword of Judgement, which unfortunately means that he is inaccurate to his appearance in the battle of Hong Kong and the entirety of The Last Knight. The sword's blade is still painted as the heated-up version from the concept art.
The Transformers toy-line is typically divided into two main factions: the heroic Autobots and their opponents, the evil Decepticons (traditionally known in Japan as the Cybertrons and Destrons, respectively, although more recent releases often using the English terms). Transformers toys are sold at a number of price points, and various Transformers series utilize unique play features.
Q-Transformers Optimus Prime is a tiny super deformed toy based on the Alternity Convoy design, transforming into a Nissan GT-R R35, though his legs retain the traditional blue truck bed motif. The English name on the packaging refers to him as just "Optimus". He comes with a code for unlocking "GTR Optimus Prime" as a playable character in the Q-Transformers: Mystery of Convoy Returns game. Standing at only slightly less than one inch and a half, this is actually the smallest transforming Optimus Prime ever made, which is a fairly impressive feat considering the surprising amount of detail in sculpt and paint apps.
Something of a shellformer, Convoy Nike Free is colored primarily white and red in his alt mode of a realistic-looking, scaled-down Nike sneaker, complete with (gratuitously long) real fabric shoelaces. In robot mode he incorporates some additional blue and silver in predictable areas and has a somewhat uniquely-shaped yet instantly recognizable G1-inspired head.
There have also been a number of spin-offs based on the toys including a comic book series, an animated television series, and a feature-length animated movie. The original series program was followed by a number of spin-offs with varying levels of popularity. A live-action film series directed by Michael Bay has produced five films, with more planned.
A Deluxe sized version of Energon Optimus Prime. Looks like a smaller version of the Leader class toy, without any trailer or drones. Can Powerlinx with other Energon Autobot toys. This toy was a Toys-R-Us store exclusive in the U.S. and was packaged together with a downsized Energon Megatron. In Japan this toy was packaged together with Kicker and a Star Saber accessory.
Surely one of the strangest examples of licensed Transformers products, Sports Label Convoy transforms into a shoe. Something of a shellformer, this baffling incarnation of Prime is colored primarily white and red in his alt mode of a realistic-looking (if notably undersized) Nike Free 7.0 sneaker, complete with gratuitously long real fabric shoelaces. In robot mode, he is made instantly recognizable by his incorporation of some additional blue and silver in predictable areas, and a traditionally Prime-styled head. Less traditionally, and somewhat perversely, Prime's feet are sculpted in the likeness of his own sneaker mode, making it seem like he's wearing himself!
The Goldbug change happens in many different continuities, but in the original animated series, it happens like this: while trying to rescue the body of the dead Optimus Prime, which was being held by evil humans, Bumblebee’s damaged by Superion so badly that they have to rebuild him as a more powerful Throttlebot. His new body is much shinier, so a restored Optimus Prime dubs him Goldbug. In the Shattered Glass continuity, he goes evil as Goldbug. And in the IDW comics, confusingly, Goldbug was never affiliated with Bumblebee, but is the leader of the Throttlebots.
A Voyager-class two pack of Classics Optimus Prime, representing the Generation 1 version of the character, and a redeco of Age of Extinction Evasion Optimus Prime representing the Movie character (The deco patterns is most likely to emulate the character's design in 2007, with vague results). Like Rusty Optimus Prime (seen below), he features flames on his vehicle mode doors.
This Japanese-exclusive reissue of the original Generation 1 Optimus Prime figure featured tinted blue windows, like those sported by the "Goodbye Convoy" edition of the toy, as well as show-accurate blue eyes. Prime came with all his original accessories, including both versions of his rifle, as well as a new die-cast metal Matrix of Leadership accessory, which could be looped around his neck on a removable chain. Additionally, the set included a show-accurate redeco of the Action Master Optimus Prime figure, a sheet of Autobot insignia stickers of varying sizes, and a mouse pad decorated with the Autobot symbol.
The values started becoming inconsistent and skewed in Generation 2 and Beast Wars, when Hasbro apparently thought no child will ever want a toy that is described as anything less than perfect. Thus it became rarer and rarer to see any low numbers. Most characters' numbers hardly ever dipped below 8, the Go-Bot version of Optimus Prime was the first character to have all values at 10, a trend that would repeat for most "leader" characters. When even more powerful versions of the Optimus Primal toy (such as Optimal Optimus) were introduced, Hasbro even invented a "10+" rating in an attempt to keep increasing the power levels. With the Transformers: Cybertron line a few characters even got "Unknown" and "Infinity" ratings.
For some reason: unlike the stock photos (pictured from the right), This Custom Kreon had a slight QC issue to the opaque and transparent helmets: One had two sides sculpted, while the other one has the small flat square sculpt (similar to the details on Hound's helmet) on the right side. Several samples had two different "variants": One with the perfect transparent helmet & a differently-sculpted opaque helmet, while the other one has the opposite. However: later releases fixes the problem by a running change.
As part of the merchandising wave for the first Transformers film in 2007, Hasbro's Playskool line released a Transformers-themed version of Mr. Potato Head based on Optimus Prime. To keep with the potato theme, the toy was labeled "Optimash Prime" and the packaging included the slogan "More than meets the fry", a potato-oriented version of the Transformers slogan "More than meets the eye".
Optimus Prime appears near the end of the Decepticon Campaign. Sam and Mikaela inform Optimus that all the Autobots were defeated by the Decepticons. Optimus proclaims that they sacrificed their lives to protect the Allspark, and their sacrifice will not be in vain. Leaving Sam and Mikaela in a safe place, Optimus faces Megatron, but is defeated. Weakened and damaged, Optimus crawls to reach the Allspark. However, Megatron attacks Optimus with his chain-flail, killing him.
Inspired by a 1985 special limited release of Optimus Prime with bonus Pepsi decals for his trailer in the US market, Pepsi Optimus Prime sports an egregious number of new new Pepsi-themed paint masks and decals, as well as an entirely new trailer unit, specially designed to carry a single 500ml-size bottle (a common size in Japan), three 350ml cans, or 12 bottle caps (bottle cap figurines being a common and popular collectible item in Japan).
A non-transforming model kit of Optimus Prime by Takara Tomy, sold exclusively in Japan. The kit comes with a pre-assembled inner frame that features a high rate of poseability similar to Master Grade Gundam model kits. The kit comes with two swords and two different sets of attachments for them: one set for the forearms and the other to replace the hands. Pre-ordered units of the first batch came with battle hooks.[138]
Just like Optimus Primal's basic bat toy, this figure was released during the short-lived period when the Beast Wars was still considered to be an extension of the Autobot/Decepticon war, and Optimus Primal was the same character as Optimus Prime. This was soon relegated to the realms of micro-continuity when the Beast Wars animated series began and clearly established that the two Optimuses were different characters, but the toy remains one that was officially branded as Prime, and is consequently listed here.
Released as part of TakaraTomy's Welcome to Transformers 2010 campaign, the "Sons of Cybertron" set includes a redeco of the 2006 Classics "Ultimate Battle" pack Deluxe class Optimus Prime, cast mostly in translucent plastic (his shoulders remain opaque Polyoxymethylene (POM)). He comes packaged with a similarly translucent redeco of Classics Rodimus.
Virtually every toy in this list has a scannable insignia sticker on it. For Hasbro releases, it temporarily unlocks that toy as a playable character in the Robots in Disguise mobile game, and can only be scanned once per day. TakaraTomy releases simply check that off on their mobile app's collection list. It's honestly quicker and less redundant to say which toys don't have this feature. Meanwhile, scanning the Combiner Force toys' insignia stickers gives the player Tickets, which can be spent by giving them to Cryostase via the main map menu.
Released as part of the Single Pack assortment, Optimus Prime is a show-accurate, non-transforming die-cast vehicle based on his alternate mode. He features through-axle construction, allowing for super-speedy racing on smooth surfaces, and his car mode is compatible with many tracks and playsets from Hot Wheels and Matchbox. He features 4 wheels, as opposed to the Legion Class' 6 wheels & his larger toy's 10 wheels. Optimus Prime also comes with a collector's flyer.
Hasbro's subsidiary Milton Bradley (MB) released the toy in Europe in late 1985, following a slight delay due to licensing issues;[13] there are no less than three variants of MB-packaged Optimus Prime, one of them manufactured by Takara and sporting blue feet, the other two manufactured by Joustra as part of a deal with Hasbro/MB, one of them with blue and the other one with red feet;[14]
One more thought: LEGO is a Danish company. The fluctuations in the price of LEGO such as the big bump around 1985-7 in Figures 1 and 2 could be because of a change in exchange rates. The conversion rate between the Danish Kronor and the US$ went from over 10 in 83 and 84 to less than 7 in 86 and 87. LEGO might have been slow to respond to changes in exchange rates, leading to the temporary bump. If you’d like to share data we can redo your graphs in DKK.
Following the awakening of the Transformers on Earth, the Autobots protected the planet from the Decepticons. Over the next fifteen years, the Autobots befriended the humans, particularly the Witwicky family. The Autobots finally allied with humankind and eventually defeated the Decepticons at the turn of the century. They planned to return to Cybertron aboard the newly constructed Ark II, along with seven humans, including Witwicky patriarch Sparkplug. Prime Directive #1 Before the ship departed, Prime gave a piece of the Matrix to Spike Witwicky, Sparkplug's son and Bumblebee's closest human friend. Prime Directive #2 But the ship was destroyed as part of a military conspiracy to take control of the Transformers.
The first Generation 2 Optimus Prime toy was largely identical in sculpt to the original release. However, his trailer was cast in black plastic, with the original blue and silver striped sticker replaced with a red and silver one that had "Optimus" in large block letters on it. The trailer also featured a soundbox attachment with a sculpted Autobot symbol on the front. The soundbox could activate a truck engine noise, a laser gun sound effect and a (badly) garbled voice that said "I am Optimus Prime!". This soundbox could also be attached onto Optimus Prime's back and be used as a sort of backpack.
This Optimus Prime is a somewhat/nearly screen-accurate redeco of the Leader Class figure, but uses the original Leader mold instead of the Armor Knight retool unfortunately. In comparison to the first Age of Extinction Leader Class figure, his vacuum-metalized front truck bumper, sun visors, robot mode chest, smokestacks and side tanks chest was omitted, revealing the grey plastic underneath. His chromed chest was also stripped of chrome for adding paint operations, his shield was unpainted, and both of his sword and truck mode windows were casted in colorless plastic. He also features some extra silver paint on his robot mode forehead, and his white-colored Autobot insignia is slightly tampographed on the left. And lastly, his light-piping eyes is neutered by blue paint.
Aside from the Powermaster feature itself, the main gimmick of the toy is the ability of the truck cab to combine with the trailer to form the larger "Super Optimus Prime" figure. This is essentially accomplished by standing the trailer up, folding the cab in half and inserting it into the empty cavity in the trailer's torso, forming an imposing—if almost entirely unposeable—robot form armed with all four weapons. The head of this super robot form is a separate piece which can be stored in the rear of Prime's trailer when not in use. While Hi-Q was always shown plugged into Prime's chest in artwork of this mode (as seen in the picture here), this was actually entirely unnecessary as transforming into Super Optimus Prime didn't require the standard Prime toy's legs to be unlocked.
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