Eleven years after their arrival on Earth, Prime and the Autobots made a new human ally in Wataru Hoshinoumi when he stumbled into the midst of a battle between Prime's team and Starscream and Ramjet. Enter! The Transformers When Megatron joined the fight soon after, he held Bumblebee and Wataru hostage, daring Prime to make a move against him. Prime opened fire, but Megatron merely used the defeated Starscream for a shield, then turned his cannon on the younger duo. Prime unleashed his ion blaster and apparently deflected the blast with a shot of his own, saving Bumblebee and Wataru and prompting the Decepticons to retreat. The Emperor of Destruction Appears!

An undocumented aspect of his transformation is that his gun, which splits in two halves and secrets inside his kibble when transforming (much like Rattrap's) has two handle pegs on opposite sides, so that it can be held either at its far end or halfway along its length. The former position makes the weapon look (charitably) more like his traditional ion blaster—or Ultra Magnus' rifle. Additionally, the gun halves can be plugged together in two different ways, theoretically allowing you to create an infinitely long weapon (or at least one of ridiculous proportions).
Billed on his packaging as "BIGGEST Optimus Prime Toy!", Ultimate Optimus Prime consists of an articulated tractor-trailer. The cab can transform into a "normal" Optimus Prime on its own, roughly equivalent to a Voyager in size and complexity, though with a lower degree of screen-accuracy than most large Optimus toys. Prime has 5mm fist holes, as well as additional 5mm ports on his front wheel wells and both sets of external fuel tanks. Four of these remain available in robot mode. The trailer has twelve more 5mm ports. Despite this, the toy comes with no weapons scaled such that the cab-only robot can usefully wield them.
Part of the first wave of Prime Series 2 Cyberverse Commander Class toys, Optimus Prime is a smaller-scale toy, and features translucent plastic for his torso so that the toy can be illuminated using the electronic lights featured in the larger playsets. He comes with two translucent "battle cannon" weapons which feature multiple 3mm posts and ports, allowing them to be held by his hands, or store/mount onto numerous ports on his person. Additionally, he features a 5mm port for a trailer hitch.

Cloud Optimus Prime is a redeco of the Classics Voyager Class Optimus Prime mold, transforming into a modern cab-over style truck of made up model, dominated by a large "energy unit" on his roof (actually a wind vane). He features a similar Generation 1-inspired deco to the original toy, but aims for a "cleaner" appearance by omitting many paint details such as stripes on the cab, while the energy unit is colored black with a silver Autobot insignia in homage to Generation 2 Optimus Prime. In robot mode, Prime's energy unit transforms into a large blaster and his smokestacks transform into a smaller laser cannon. Additionally, both weapons can combine together to form a double-barrelled over-shoulder weapon. He was available exclusively at TakaraTomy Mall.
Through the years, there have been many action figures made in the likeness of the original incarnation of Optimus Prime, some of which have been featured in fiction, others of which have not. Additionally, some toy makers have made unlicensed toys in his image or accessories for the existing toys. The original 1984 Optimus Prime toy was part of Takara's 1983 Diaclone toy line named "Battle Convoy". It was designed by the creative design team of Hiroyuki Obara, Shoji Kawamori, famous for his work in Macross, and Kohjin Ohno.[23] The toy's characteristics, such as the head design and the use of the cab front as the upper torso, have become design elements in nearly every incarnation and variant of Optimus Prime. This particular toy has been reissued multiple times, mostly to commemorate the anniversary of the Transformers franchise. Optimus Prime was also released as an Action Master and Powermaster toy in the original Transformers toy line.
Here is another thing, people complain about the presence of stickers in a LEGO set. I have news for them, stickers keep down the cost of a set. The latest modular building will have stickers with it, but it isn’t the last time a set geared toward adults will have stickers with it. At least LEGO listened to our wishes and got rid of STAMPS (Stickers across multiple pieces). Still that modular will be the only set that will have a red baseplate and printed golden star tiles. Translation, that set will be very hot on the secondary market when it is retired. It is going to be very hard to source out the baseplate if people try to build Palace Cinema by sourcing its parts. (Which is a project some are doing with Cafe Corner and the UCS Falcon)
This new smaller mold of Optimus Prime features a similar transformation to the original toy. Unlike most transformable figures in this line, Optimus completely lacks 5mm fist holes. Compared to the finalized toy, the product photo on the back of the box has a number of deco differences, most notably silver thighs and white accents above the front windows in addition to those below. The same box photo and the more deco-accurate stock photo (right) also neglect to fold out his fists, which is the only other step in his two-step transformation.
Another release of the Leader Class Optimus Prime figure, now redecoed from the original Revenge of the Fallen Leader Class mold, but with the gimmick-less arms from the Supreme Class retool, and a pair of articulated fingers which was not previously used for the original release. He also retains his pair of Energon Swords and Hooks, and his Knuckle piece. He also retains the fuel tanks that can combine to form his ion blaster. In terms of deco, he features a darker plastic color and paint (which resulted in a two-tone shades of silver & gunmetal), which is meant to go with this line's Jetfire.
Timelines Rodimus is a BotCon 2008 exclusive recolor of Classic Rodimus in black that is based on Black Rodimus. An evil alternate version of the Generation 1 character, according to the comic writers his personality is based on Vinnie Barbarino from the TV series Welcome Back, Kotter, using variants of Vinnie's famous put-downs. His new appearance has inspiration from the facial hair of parallel universe Mister Spock from the Star Trek episode "Mirror, Mirror".

This Optimus Prime is a new mold that matches the character's more cartoony and simplified appearance in the Q-Transformers: Mystery of Convoy Returns cartoon. The "Watashi ni ii kangae ga aru" added to his name means "I have a good idea" (私にいい考えがある). A line originally spoken by G1 Optimus Prime at various times in the Japanese dub of the original cartoon, it has a reputation as a catchphrase of his among Japanese fans and has been reused by many Optimus Primes since, including the Prime in the Q-Transformers cartoon.

This Trailer is identical to the original BeCool Trailer other than the stickers, and now comes with the trailer/launcher accessory from Bot Shots redecoed in blue with red stripes. While the vehicle mode sticker in his chest remains, the hand-holding and sleeping ones have been replaced by pictures of the launcher: one in base mode and one in trailer mode. He also comes with a sticker sheet for decorating the Trailer Base.
Apart from this, Optimus Prime is also the weakest link of the gestalt combination, due to a number of design failures attributed to his torso mode. The square holes-and-tabs used to secure the arms together when in torso mode are too weak to remain locked in place (though a very small amount of copies can secure the arm well), and are prone to falling out of position should an attached arm be moved. The torso mode's skirt plate is also attached to the stomach rather than the pelvis, rendering the waist swivel nearly worthless due to the skirt obstructing articulation.
Available in a two pack set with Battle Changer Megatron, this Optimus is largely the same as as the single release, with some minor differences. He uses a new "double harness" piece on his torso instead of using two harnesses, leaving more space for his head to grip the neck-post. He also has different windshield decals, and his reds and blues are slightly darker. And, most obviously, he has an additional buildable trailer, though it doesn't really attach to the truck mode in any meaningful way.
LEGO is not ignoring the lower priced market, however. As we can see from the chart below, the average price of a set of LEGO has been relatively stable since the 80s2. Even with the average piece count of sets increasing over time, the average price has remained stable. This shows that for all the larger expensive sets being released, they are also releasing plenty of average priced sets that balance out the average. Not only has the size of sets increased but so has the number of sets released per year (prices are in US dollars).
This Trailer is identical to the original BeCool Trailer other than the stickers, and now comes with the trailer/launcher accessory from Bot Shots redecoed in blue with red stripes. While the vehicle mode sticker in his chest remains, the hand-holding and sleeping ones have been replaced by pictures of the launcher: one in base mode and one in trailer mode. He also comes with a sticker sheet for decorating the Trailer Base.
It may be that the price of an individual brick has gone down over time, but what does it matter if the size of the bricks has decreased overtime? Sure, the average number of pieces in a set has increased, but how many of those pieces are tiny details? To answer this question, I compiled all the weight data on brickset.com and compared the sets by their price per gram in a similar fashion to how I compared them by price of piece. Below is the chart of my results (prices are in US dollars).

Bumblebee may be beloved, but so is Optimus Prime and writers have seemingly killed off Optimus a million times in different continuities. So it can’t be too much of a surprise to know that Bee has met his maker on a few occasions as well. In the “Dark Cybertron” storyline of the IDW Generation 1 continuity, Decepticon Shockwave goes mad with power and wants to destroy all Autobots and Decepticons. In the process, Shockwave kills Bumblebee and sets off a chain of events that leads to retribution against Shockwave.

A (technically) unreleased "black" redeco of Henkei Voyager-sized Convoy using the same plastic layout and paint mask but replacing red and blue with black, silver with gray, leaving the previously vacuum-metalized grill/fender area unpainted, changing the blue tint for the windows to red and changing all silver and yellow paint operations to blue. The red Autobot insignias would have remained unchanged.[7]
This military-colors redeco of the Auto Roller Dirtbag was planned for late Generation 2 and widely solicited alongside fellow redeco Sargent Hound, but never saw release. Transforming into an "earth mover" dump truck, he has an auto-transforming gimmick activated by rolling his rear wheels; roll forward to go to robot mode, and back to dump truck. A switch on his back end separates the gears of the gimmick, allowing him to roll freely in either mode. In vehicle mode, his missiles can peg onto the front end of the dump-bed for storage. In robot mode, he has a twin spring-loaded missile launcher in his right arm, and a clamping "stun gun" claw on the left.
As the two Titans battled, Optimus found Megatron watching the fight and demanded he assist them, but Megatron refused. When Trypticon swallowed the Enigma of Combination and took control of the Combiners, Optimus attempted to attack them as a distraction, but he was caught and the Combiners attempted to pull him apart. Optimus managed to break free of his captors and was further saved by the timely arrival of Megatron. Against Optimus's wishes, Perceptor returned and tricked Trypticon into swallowing the Matrix. Consumed However, this ultimately proved successful, and Trypticon released all that he had swallowed during the conflict before falling inert once again. The relief was short-lived, though, as Megatronus suddenly appeared before them, proving Optimus's fears. Optimus and Maximus attempted to surprise attack Megatronus, but he brushed off their blows and fired a beam through Optimus's chest, killing the Autobot once more. All Things Must Pass
Virtually every toy in this list has a scannable insignia sticker on it. For Hasbro releases, it temporarily unlocks that toy as a playable character in the Robots in Disguise mobile game, and can only be scanned once per day. TakaraTomy releases simply check that off on their mobile app's collection list. It's honestly quicker and less redundant to say which toys don't have this feature. Meanwhile, scanning the Combiner Force toys' insignia stickers gives the player Tickets, which can be spent by giving them to Cryostase via the main map menu.

Released by TakaraTomy as part of a 2010 promotion honoring the "future era" of the original cartoon (which was set in 2010 in Japanese continuity, you see!), this exceptionally morbid re-release of the Masterpiece Convoy figure recolors the Autobot leader in blacks and greys, representing his dead body from The Transformers: The Movie—but don't worry, kids, it's actually a "sleep mode", according to the figure's name! Limited to 2010 pieces in Japan (see what they did there?), it comes with all its customary accessories, including the Perfect Edition trailer, redecoed where appropriate: the trailer itself has become translucent, its energon-axe is now transparent grey, and Megatron, in another movie homage, is rendered in translucent purple, evoking the scene depicting his transformation into Galvatron. The figure was also released in other parts of Asia as a limited edition of 2010 as well, combined with the Japanese edition for 4020 total. The Japanese version denotes "Serial Number in Japan: ####/2010" on its bio card with the number out of 2010, while the Asian version denotes "C1 - ####/2010" with the number out of 2010 on its bio card.
Cyber Slammers Optimus Prime is an amazingly cute truck that transforms into an amazingly cute Autobot. "Slam" his robot mode down into car mode and he rolls along for a while, then snaps back up into robot mode. Sure to please the toddler you brought with you to the PG-13 movie! Like most Cyber Slammers, Prime manages to cram most of his vehicle mode's major details into a compact, super-deformed version of that mode.
The Diaclone Powered Convoy figure had several additional features and modes which were mostly excised or left unmentioned for the Transformers release of Ultra Magnus. Principally, Powered Convoy came packaged with "Powered Buggy", who was left out of Magnus's release (see notes below for further details). Omitted from Magnus's instructions is the ability of his chestplate and super robot head to combine to form a small vehicle; the Powered Convoy version of the figure included small rolling wheels on the underside of the chestplate which were removed for Ultra Magnus. Additionally, three additional modes were included in the Diaclone instructions that Hasbro left out: a "preparation base" mode and an "Autobot base" mode were excluded entirely, while the third, a "catapult launcher" mode originally intended and proportioned to accommodate the Diaclone Jet Robo figure that became Starscream, was shown only on the front of his packaging, interacting with Silverbolt. The Japanese release of Ultra Magnus—released as part of the Scramble City sub-line—did include instructions for the preparation base and catapult launcher modes, but replaced the original Autobot base mode with a new configuration.

The figure was released in Japan along with Legends Megatron and Starscream, under the "EZ Collection" banner, in the same packaging as the Hasbro release but with a small card insert featuring the Japanese logo and nomenclature, similar to a USA Edition. As with all the EZ Collection figures, this release features a substantially greater number of paint operations that increase Optimus's resemblance to his larger figure.
The Transformers Energon figure pen is based on Optimus Prime in his standard Energon body. About the size of a scout class toy, he transforms from truck mode to robot mode almost identically to his mainline toys, apart from the fact that his feet contain the pen and cannot bend. It's really hard to write with, and almost impossible to pose, even though it has full arm articulation. Amusingly, this figure can position itself to transform into his super robot mode (by flipping his helmet on, opening his chest and flipping his hands in), but because there are no versions of the Prime Force drones in this scale, it's impossible to complete him.
Softimus Prime is, as his name suggests, a plush G1 Optimus Prime toy. Obviously, he has no problems with articulation and passes the drop test with flying colors. His main draw is the ability to "transform" into his Freightliner FL86 vehicle mode by turning the plush toy inside out, his transformation roughly similar to the Powermaster cab Prime's. He is love.
In 1984, a volcanic eruption re-activated the Ark, which, in turn, brought the Transformers back on-line. Prime led the Autobots in their opening battles to prevent the Decepticons from plundering Earth's resources, but, following their initial victory, the Transformers were all deactivated by Shockwave. Shockwave killed Prime and leeched the energy of the Creation Matrix from his mind. He used this energy to give life to his creations, the Constructicons. Shockwave was unaware that the Matrix was not just a program in Prime's mind, but a physical object in his chest. Before Shockwave could give life to Jetfire, his next Decepticon, Prime transferred the Matrix energy into the mind of Buster Witwicky. Buster used the energy to turn Jetfire on Shockwave, allowing Prime to reclaim his body and retake leadership of the Autobots. As a reward, he gave Jetfire true life.
It took two further years, but this figure was eventually released as part of the Japanese counterpart to the Alternators line (Binaltech) in 2008. Binaltech Convoy features some additional paint details, like his silver pelvis, additional patterns on his shoulders, and red paint on his engine-gun, and like all Binaltech figures, he also includes die-cast metal pieces. Unlike previous Binaltech releases, a bio-card was not included.
In one possible sequence of events, Powerglide was captured and reprogrammed by the Decepticons, leading their army to Autobot headquarters. Taken by surprised, the Autobots were felled one by one until only Optimus remained. As Megatron gloated that he would not kill Optimus, only alter him so as to make him the bane of humanity, Optimus activated the Ark’s self-destruct sequence, taking all of the Decepticons with him in a fiery explosion.
Part of the first wave of Age of Extinction: Generations Voyager Class toys, "Evasion Mode Optimus Prime" is an all-new figure based on the character's initial form in the film, transforming from a cab-over semi truck into a robot mostly similar to his previous movie design. The truck mode is heavily based on Generation 1 Optimus Prime's White Freightliner WFT alt mode in both sculpt and deco, although it draws a few details, such as the singular smokestack and wheel designs, from the heavily faded Marmon 97 seen on-screen. In robot mode, he sports faux-kibble windows and, amusingly, two false smokestacks. Unfortunately, due to being used with the transformation, he lacks the real elbow joint on the arm, which makes the lower section of the arm the only poseable section. Also, Optimus can wield weapons with longer posts while his arms are in a "default" 90° position.
A limited edition of the Optimus Prime toy sold as a mail-away exclusive by PepsiCo was made available in North America in 1985. This version of the figure came with a small fold-out leaflet glued to the top-right of the packaging, which contained two Pepsi logo stickers for the buyer to attach to Prime, mid-way through the traditional silver-and-blue stripe on his trailer. Canada also got a version of this promotional figure, but with much larger stickers that were the full length and height of the trailer. This promotion would go on to serve as the inspiration for the Japanese character of Pepsi Convoy, who would in turn be released by Hasbro as a new "Pepsi Optimus Prime" in 2007.
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