The first toy in TakaraTomy's United toyline is a redeco of the War for Cybertron Deluxe Class Optimus Prime, transforming into a Cybertronic "armored truck". As has been TakaraTomy's wont of late, he now sports a metallic red paint job, with brighter pink paint applications and cooler grey parts, and features several additional paint details to those present on the Hasbro figure in the form of black chest windows and pink lines on his face mask. His rifle transforms as well, folding and plugging into the roof of the vehicle mode. The rifle can also peg into his forearms, and, in its compact configuration, can attach to his shoulders via peg holes on the backs of his front tires or stored behind his back in robot mode.
Based upon the "Protoform" (Cybertronian) appearances of the Transformers in the Movie, Protoform Optimus Prime transforms into his "entry" mode. This mode somewhat resembles a cybertronic truck, with false wheels sculpted onto the sides, and Optimus Prime's trademark windows in front. A flame decoration piece fits to the back of the "vehicle", creating the illusion of a flaming comet's tail. The bottom of the vehicle has small wheels to roll the toy across smooth surfaces. Oddly, it has NO automorph gimmick at all, a feature most main-line figures have.

Aware of the changes to the timestream and the potential for the entire Autobot race to be annihilated by Unicron, Optimus put into motion Operation Distant Thunder, a plan to undo the damage to the timeline caused by Ravage, restoring the events that were seen in the movie. This would mean that saving all the Autobots from Unicron would result in Prime and others such as Prowl, Wheeljack, Ironhide, and Ratchet would die per the original events. They hoped they would be able to at least partially avoid such an outcome by sending a message to their past selves about all they had learned.
Outstanding work here. After reading a number of complaints about how the price has ‘increased’ over the years, it’s great to see this analytical approach. One additional hypothesis I have is related to the increase in the number of sets released each year, which would appear to be supported by your data. More sets to buy to be ‘complete’ makes for more money out of pocket.
Released as part of the Energon Igniters Power Plus Series subline, this Optimus Prime is a Scout-sized mold that converts from robot to truck based on his appearance in Age of Extinction in just a few steps. His only articulation is the swiveling upper arms & pivoting arm joints, and his fuel tanks also doubles as a flip-out cannons, activated in vehicle mode. As with all Nitro and Power Plus figures, Optimus also comes with an energon core, which allows his vehicle mode to propel forwards.
The bio for the Botcon 2015 version of Megatron reveals that he comes from an alternate reality where Megatron achieved victory during events similar to Dark of the Moon and killed both Optimus and Sentinel Prime. However, Rodimus Prime then arose to challenge him, facing him in a battle that Megatron ultimately chose to flee, resulting in him ending up in the Axiom Nexus.
As with other Dark of the Moon Activators toys, this Optimus Prime (released under the Robo Power subline) is a very simple one-step transformation toy. You simply slam him down on the big blue button on the back end of his truck mode and he transforms thanks to spring-loaded mechanisms. To transform him back, just slam him down again on the same blue button.
Available exclusively at Toys "R" Us, Rodimus transforms into a futuristic car that is a homage to the vehicle mode of Generation 1 Hot Rod. A panel on the car's hood, which is also the figure's chest, can be flipped to either show an engine block or the figure's Autobot insignia. The figure comes with an Energy Bow, capable of firing two missiles. His bow can also be tabbed to the roof of his car mode or snapped on his hand. The tabs that secure his bow in vehicle mode are 5mm wide, making it usable by other figures as well. His legs are normally bent for the underside of his car mode but can be locked straight during transformation.
The internet can be blamed for the size and scope of the secondary LEGO market. On the website, BrickLink, you can find almost any set that LEGO has ever produced. In addition, the site keeps records of trends in the market and value of individual pieces. This site is invaluable to a LEGO collector and has given many the ability to grow their collections. Before the advent of this site and sites like eBay, collecting LEGO required going to garage sales. There are now whole sites dedicated to buying LEGO as an investment, but that is a topic for another article.

I suspect that part of the problem with people’s perception of price is also due to changes in tastes as they grow up. A small child will be pleased with relatively small sets, since their lego collection and experience is likely to be almost non-existent. But as they get older, they will tire of the small sets and want ever bigger sets. For adults, most of the fun is in building rather than playing, meaning that size is everything. This means that over their lifetime, the price an individual person (or their parent) pays for lego sets does go up–because the composition of their purchases changes–even though the prices of lego sets over time does not.
Besides the inordinate number of Hogwarts Castles, we can draw similar conclusions from this chart as we can from the Pirate Ship Chart. The prices really have not changed that much in the measurable time-frame2. The weighted average for all the castles is 10.56 cents per piece. As with the Pirate Ships, there does seem to be a general increase in piece count, however.
In the United Kingdom, this Optimus Prime was released as an Argos exclusive along with several other sets branded as part of the Reveal the Shield subline imprint. His United States release was initially claimed to be exclusive to Target by online retailers from Asia, but even though the other Reveal the Shield products eventually became available at Target, Voyager Class Optimus Prime was released as a Toys"R"Us exclusive in the United States instead, complete with a "Toys"R"Us exclusive" sticker. Also, both his United States and Asian releases lack the "Reveal the Shield" logo the United Kingdom release has (but still feature the "Reveal hidden images" call-out).
Reissued in 2003 as part of Takara's Transformers Collection line of reissues. This version (#13 in the Collection series) was retooled from the 2000/2002 Rodimus Major tooling in order to make the fists and engine block hole wide enough to equip Firebolt. In addition, the original 2 guns had their posts modified so that a Targetmaster Hot Rod could still use them, if the owner chose to.
Optimus Prime appears in the prequel novel Transformers: Ghosts of Yesterday, where he and a group of Autobots travel in the Ark searching for the Allspark, battling Starscream's Decepticons along the way. While going through a worm hole, the Autobots find themselves encountering a group of humans in a spacecraft reverse-engineered from studying Megatron. With this discovery, Prime realizes the significance of Earth, as both Megatron and the Allspark are there. After saving Bumblebee from a pit of rock-chewing cave worms, Prime battles Starscream. He is about to be gunned down by Starscream and Bonecrusher when he is saved by the human craft. In retaliation, Starscream obliterates it.
Optimus Prime has fictionally shown a dislike of certain kinds of music and dance. For the Marvel Comics continuity, the letters page for issue 324 mentions he hates the music of Mötley Crüe. In the cartoon continuity, "Blaster Blues" and "Quest for Survival" have Optimus react noticeably more passive-aggressively to Blaster's choice of music than the other Autobots. And in the Dreamwave Generation One continuity, Hardwired features an uncalled for negative remark about Jazz's dance skills.
The 1984 and 1985 toy lines contained several figures of note. Megatron, the Decepticon leader, originally transformed into a realistic Walther P38 pistol with stock and barrel extensions and scope. The Megatron toy was delayed till 1985 for release in the UK. The Constructicons were the first "gestalt" team in the Transformers line, but were different from most subsequent gestalt teams in that they consisted of six members instead of five. The Autobot Jetfire was repainted from a Macross toy, specifically the VF-1 Valkyrie, and the character was renamed Skyfire in the animated television series program for copyright reasons.
Hot Rod would make his first IDW Publishing appearance in a Spotlight issue focusing on him. In this, he was shown to be newly promoted to command of a group of Autobots including Gizmo, Backbeat and Dealer, who had been sent to secure the Magnificence, a device of some sort that could predict the future. Getting past the guardians, Hot Rod was swapping it with a fake to prevent the Decepticons from getting their hands on it when a seeming Decepticon ambush wiped out his squad. Determined to rescue the only survivor, Dealer, Hot Rod staged a daring solo rescue mission that managed to rescue Dealer - unaware that he was really Doubledealer, a Decepticon spy sent by Banzaitron to retrieve the Magnificence and now out to find where Hot Rod had stashed it.[10]
While the Transformers animated series came to an end in America in 1987 after The Rebirth, production was continued in Japan with three new, exclusive animated series spin-offs to continue the story. The first of these series, Transformers: The Headmasters, supplanted the events of The Rebirth, picking up one year after the events that saw Optimus Prime's return to life.
A Voyager class figure that transforms from semi-trailer truck to robot. Head features retractable face plate. The figure's main gimmick is a spring-loaded mechanism that spins the lower torso during transformation to robot mode. Trailer detaches and transforms into a giant Ion Axe or jet pack. Prime's gun can be filled with a small amount of water. Some variants of the figure come with the Autobot symbol printed on his left shoulder while others do not.
Came with the Mini-Con Sparkplug. Could combine with Armada Jetfire (and its repaints) and/or Armada Overload (and its repaints). The trailer could convert into a base for Mini-Cons. In Japan a gold chrome edition of this toy was released as a Lucky Draw special. With its trailer the vehicle mode of this toy bears a great resemblance to G1 Star Convoy. According to the Armada video game Armada Optimus Prime is supposed to be 22 feet 10 inches tall (696 cm tall) and the toy is 17.5 cm tall. So that's a scale of 1:40.[55]
(As an odd postscript to this tale of footwear-induced madness, although the promo pictures all showed the shoeformer as a white and navy blue sneaker that transforms into a white and aqua blue robot, the product actually released sported much darker colors for all the robot-mode parts, with a deep teal instead of aqua, and almost all the white replaced by an icky tan/cream/grey color, including the head. Basically, the figure looks like the promo picture viewed through really dark sunglasses. Although this certainly doesn't make it look any more like Prime, you might argue that it looks a little less like Magnus. Sorta. Maybe. Not really.)
A Deluxe class toy of Prime in his Protoform stage. One of the first released movie figures, Prime's Entry Mode resembles a huge metallic asteroid. With this figure standing 5.5 inches tall and Optimus being 28 feet (336 inches) tall, the toy is about 1/61 scale. This rock-like alternate mode has led some fans to sarcastically refer to the movie protoform toys as Rock Lords.
The Premium Series Optimus Prime is both a retool and a redeco of the Leader Class Optimus Prime toy. The major selling point is a more movie-accurate head sculpt with longer ears and detailing based on the final CG head design, and a flip-out energy sword to replace the ion blaster that was included with previous versions of the toy. This energy sword is detachable and attaches where the Ion Blaster did, compatible with non-premium Optimus Prime Leader-class-based releases. Because his ears are much longer, the truck roof panel that hides his head now has two holes cut into so the head can fit inside the cabin.
The 1986 line featured another significant change in that many, if not the majority, of the toys were conceived as futuristic vehicles and bore little resemblance to present-day machinery. This was due to changes in the movie and television series, which leaped ahead twenty years to the year 2005. Many have speculated that this change might have been what signaled the beginning of the end for the Transformers, as part of the novelty of the first lines was the realistic vehicles that turned into robots.
After having spent an extended period of time lost on Quintessa, Optimus was returned to Cybertron by the Turbomasters during their efforts to retrieve the similarly lost Flash, who he had been drawn into Perceptor's Dimensional Interface Assembly. The Age of Wrath Pt.5 Though badly damaged, Optimus led an insurrection against the then Megatron-controlled Cybertron, and successfully overthrew his enemy from power, all the while thwarting a Quintesson invasion. The Age of Wrath Pt.6
How to Say Expensive and Mean It - The Seibertron.com Twincast / Podcast reaches episode #213, and the discussion begins with Takara Tomy's upcoming Masterpiece MP-44 Optimus Prime version 3. This toy has a substantial price tag that has caused controversy amongst Transformers fans. In-hand impressions of Transformers Generations War for Cybertron: Siege figures come next, with analysis starting for Deluxe Class figures Sideswipe, Hound, Cog, and Skytread/Flywheels. After that, Micromasters from the Race Car, Battle, and Air Strike Patrols get a look. Weaponizers Lionizer, Blowpipe, and Firedrive come next before the Generations discussion concludes with Voyager Class Megatron and Optimus Prime. A look at the upcoming Generations Select releases of Ricochet and Red Swoop is followed by a quick examination of the recently released Transformers: Botbots lineup. The endings of the long-running IDW Transformers comics continuity comes next, with the end of event book Unicron occurring first. Optimus Prime's namesake series is talked about next before the comics discussion concludes with Lost Light's finale. Bragging Rights close out another episode with early holiday season sales driving the cast's recent purchases.
Although the original Japanese incarnation of Transformers: Cybertron, known as Transformers: Galaxy Force, was produced apart from Armada and Energon, the series, as originally conceived by Hasbro, was as the third part of the trilogy. The English language dub of the series treats it as such.[50] Consequently, inconsistencies arise between Cybertron and the other two series, but have been explained by the Cybertron comic book, available exclusively through the Official Transformers Collectors Club, as the result of fluctuations in the fabric of reality caused by the Unicron-induced black hole.
In Another Light, Rodimus finally assumes total control over the Autobots upon Optimus Prime and several of his closest loyalists being jettisoned into space and left near death following the Battle of Decepticon City. However, his reign came to a swift end when the group returned, having been reformatted into the Knights of Unicron. The heroically reborn Optimus, now known as Nova Prime, engaged his usurper in battle and defeated Rodimus, sending him plummeting into Cybertron's depths. However, Rodimus then encountered the malevolent Primus, who enlisted his aid and that of other "true Autobots" in ridding his surface of those he considered vermin-namely, all Decepticons and Autobots not loyal to the same cause. This would lead to an epic battle between Primus' minions and the heroic Transformers of their universe: Galvatron's Decepticons, Nova Prime's Autobots, and a group of Maximals created from Classics Autobots.

Similar to the Activators toyline, One-Step Changer Optimus Prime features a spring-loaded transformation. He features swivel articulation in the head and both arms. He shares a similar (not identical) transformation with his fellow One-Step changer, Hound. Also, due to his transformation scheme, his shoulders can be pushed forward (the arms is pushed on the same time), which also allows him to wield a close ranged weapons with longer handles with both hands.
With Season One of Cyberverse drawn to a close, we have word of a newly-listed Cyberverse DVD currently available for pre-order. Titled ‘Transformers Cyberverse: The Journey’, the anthology consists of 66 minutes of product, which can only be assumed to consist of the first six episodes, given the DVD’s plot synopsis and the title of the collection corresponding to the show’s fourth episode, ‘The Journey’. The DVD itself is listed here by New Zealand based online retailer - Read More
The values started becoming inconsistent and skewed in Generation 2 and Beast Wars, when Hasbro apparently thought no child will ever want a toy that is described as anything less than perfect. Thus it became rarer and rarer to see any low numbers. Most characters' numbers hardly ever dipped below 8, the Go-Bot version of Optimus Prime was the first character to have all values at 10, a trend that would repeat for most "leader" characters. When even more powerful versions of the Optimus Primal toy (such as Optimal Optimus) were introduced, Hasbro even invented a "10+" rating in an attempt to keep increasing the power levels. With the Transformers: Cybertron line a few characters even got "Unknown" and "Infinity" ratings.
Hero Optimus Prime was the first new-mold Optimus Prime toy created for the Generation 2 line. He transforms into a Kenworth truck of unknown model which defies Optimus convention by being one continuous unit, rather than the traditional cab-and-trailer combo. Decals form the windows of a faux truck face to represent his chest, featuring both his name and what appears to be a life support readout coming alive towards the end. In addition to a small gun, he is armed with a large missile launcher, which can fire a rubber-tipped rocket by means of a bellows which you slam your fist down on to produce a puff of air. The launcher is accessible in both modes, ending up mounted on his right forearm in robot mode; the bellows is attached via a rubber hose and cannot be disconnected, but stores on the figures's back when not in use, as do the rockets. A similar air-launching system with identical missiles was used by the simultaneously-released Hero Megatron, and by Laser Optimus Prime the following year (see below).
Only available at ToysЯUs, this Optimus Prime is a redeco of the Classics figure. He features a cartoon/toy accurate deco on his truck/robot parts, and vacuum-metallized upper legs & front grille to evoke his original Generation 1 toy. Like every Classics Optimus Prime mold, he still features all of his accessories. This Optimus was packaged along with the redecoed Age of Extinction Optimus Prime.
Just like Optimus Primal's basic bat toy, this figure was released during the short-lived period when the Beast Wars was still considered to be an extension of the Autobot/Decepticon war, and Optimus Primal was the same character as Optimus Prime. This was soon relegated to the realms of micro-continuity when the Beast Wars animated series began and clearly established that the two Optimuses were different characters, but the toy remains one that was officially branded as Prime, and is consequently listed here.

However, Prime was encouraged to keep fighting by the cheers of a human boy named Junpei. Megatron, surprised at Prime's resilience, attempted to finish his foe off with his Tornado Axe attack. Prime countered with his Double Wheel-Torque Mega-Ton, which trumped Megatron's attack and injured the Decepticon badly. Megatron teleported back to his ship and left Earth's atmosphere, vowing to return.
Marketed as a reissue of Powermaster Optimus Prime, this Toys R Us-exclusive Commemorative Series figure is in truth based on the Ginrai tooling on the toy that had previously been exclusive to Japan. It features a die-cast metal cab with translucent blue windows, and shortened, chrome smokestacks, and comes packaged with the drone Apex Bomber (formerly Ginrai's partner Godbomber), who splits into several components and combines with Prime to form "Apex Armor". As with all other Commemorative Series figures, Prime's new spring-loaded missile launcher featured an elongated missile.
On a Cybertron dominated by Shockwave and the Decepticons, Optimus Prime and the Autobots took on the roles of resistance fighters. Cobra experimentation transported a contingent of Cobras and G.I. Joes to Cybertron and destabilized Teletran 3, which led to the computer sending several Transformers to Earth across different time periods. When Optimus Prime saw Jazz get zapped by Teletran 3, he leapt to rescue his soldier, only to be transported away as well. G.I. Joe vs. the Transformers II #1 A team made up of Joes and Cobra agents were sent back and found Optimus Prime and the Stunticons in 1930s-era Chicago, disguised as period cars and trucks. The Stunticons chased Prime and the Joes around the city until everything was wrapped up with bullets, a collapsed bridge and some dynamite. G.I. Joe vs. the Transformers II #2
The Japanese release of Powermaster Optimus Prime actually represented a new character named Ginrai, and featured several retools: the cab featured die-cast metal, shortened smokestacks, vacuum-metalized plastic and clear blue windows, while the trailer was given retractable super robot fists. This Japanese version was eventually issued by Hasbro in 2003 as part of the Commemorative Series collection (see below).
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