Released as part of the first wave of the Cyberverse Commander class figures, this Optimus Prime is a roughly Scout-sized figure.He comes with a jetpack that can combine with both his truck and robot modes. The jetpack attaches via C joint clips, and the jetpack can transform in and out of a winged configuration when Optimus is in truck mode. Optimus himself features C joint bars for his smokestacks and trailer hitch, as well as bars on the top of his headache rack, while his hands and jetpack can hold/mount his rifles via C joint-related 3mm clips/holes.
Optimus was made available as a mail-away toy in the "Digital Doom on the Highway to Destruction" offer in the US in 1986 to coincide with the Transformers movie in 1986. He cost $21.50 and 5 robot points, and came with a special Movie Edition Certificate and a round sticker that read " Movie . Edition . Transformer" with the Autobot symbol in the middle. (This item is considered rare.)

The first Transformers toys were created from two different transforming robot toylines from Takara, the Car-Robots and Micro Change, from the Diaclone and Microman series, respectively. Hasbro acquired the rights to sell them in the United States but, instead of selling them under their original names, they were rebranded as "The Transformers". The first two years consisted primarily of reusing the Car-Robots/Micro Change molds. The earliest toys had some parts made of die-cast metal, which were eventually phased out.
This small version of Energon Optimus Prime was released by Kabaya as part of their DX Transformers line of candy toys. Prime transforms in the same manner as the larger Energon figures do, though his arms have to be removed at the shoulder and reinserted into his back to form truck mode. The Prime Force were sold in a separate set in the DX Transformers series, and can combine with Prime to form his Super Mode. Optimus came with a stick of gum.
He was only available as an Amazon exclusive in the United States, but was also released at brick and mortar retails in Australia and Hasbro's Asian markets, such as Singapore. Oddly enough, even though the official press release for the figure identifies it as "14 of 30" in Hasbro's Thrilling 30 campaign, the packaging does not sport any such markings.[3] To complicate matters further, a later retrospective by Hasbro on Facebook identifies another product as "14 of 30", which doesn't sport any such markings on its packaging either.[4]
Optimus was made available as a mail-away toy in the "Digital Doom on the Highway to Destruction" offer in the US in 1986 to coincide with the Transformers movie in 1986. He cost $21.50 and 5 robot points, and came with a special Movie Edition Certificate and a round sticker that read " Movie . Edition . Transformer" with the Autobot symbol in the middle. (This item is considered rare.)
This is not to suggest that specialized pieces are bad. Far from it. LEGO Indiana Jones would never feel real without Indy’s whip; LEGO Board Games would never spring to life without their unique dice. But there’s no denying that specialized pieces are costly to produce, and their proliferation was a prime reason why the LEGO Group’s profits plummeted through much of the 1990s, despite steady sales.
As part of the merchandising wave for the first Transformers film in 2007, Hasbro's Playskool line released a Transformers-themed version of Mr. Potato Head based on Optimus Prime. To keep with the potato theme, the toy was labeled "Optimash Prime" and the packaging included the slogan "More than meets the fry", a potato-oriented version of the Transformers slogan "More than meets the eye".
This figure was designed by Yūki Ōshima and produced by KT Figure Collection. The figure is actually a mini bust of Optimus Prime, which includes the head and the upper body without arms. The chest design comes with translucent blue windows and a grill on the midsection. There is also a button in the back. Pushing the button will open the chest and cause the Matrix to emerge, similar to the scene in The Transformers: The Movie.
The only differences with the unreleased version, aside from the packaging, are that silver paint has been added to the previously unpainted grill/fender area, the blue paint operations have been changed to teal, and the red Autobot insignias have been replaced by purple Decepticon ones. Prime's bio apparently explains that he took on this new color scheme in order to infiltrate the Decepticon ranks, in response to recent attacks by some new Decepticon forces pretending to be Autobots.
Although MechTech Optimus Prime's deco is similar to the first Deluxe Class figure, some of his parts (robot shoulder flaps, chest piece/truck front) were recast in blue plastic (with the chest being painted red), and his paint applications on the pelvis, headlights & thighs are omitted. His front truck hood/backpack's deco is altered: the truck steps and the fenders were painted blue, and the gold sprays on the flame tampographs are removed, while he features additional flame tampos on both sides of his front hood, and an Autobot Insignia on his left robot shoulder. He still retains the light-piping gimmick, but cast in clear plastic, with the eyeballs being (halfheartedly) painted with clear blue. His MechTech weapon is cast in transparent orange plastic, with the exception of the scope/lever and the gun barrel, which remained opaque silver plastic due to being cast with unpaintable plastic. He also features Cyberglyphics on the left side of his vehicle mode front hood.

In "Prime Target", Lord Cholmondeley, a big game hunter, set his sights on the ultimate trophy, the head of Optimus Prime. In order to lure Optimus in, Cholmondeley captured Tracks, Bumblebee, Jazz, Beachcomber, Grapple, Blaster and Inferno. Windcharger and Huffer were able to avoid being trapped. When Cosmos learned where Cholmondeley was keeping the captured Transformers, Optimus Prime accepted Cholmondeley's challenge to meet him alone. Although interrupted by Astrotrain and Blitzwing's attempt to ally the Decepticons with Cholmondeley, Optimus defeated the big game hunter and freed the Autobots. Cholmondeley and the stolen jet were handed over to the Soviets by the Autobots as punishment for his actions.
Standing only two-and-a-quarter inches tall, Smallest Transforming Transformers Optimus Prime was the smallest fully transforming G1 Optimus toy for a while, at least until the release of his chubby super-deformed Q-Transformers versions. He features an accurate transformation sequence based on the original full-sized toy, replacing the detachable hands with actual sculpted fists, and even including a tiny version of his laser rifle. Unsurprisingly, he also has little articulation and is only capable of moving his arms and legs.
If Sparkplug suggested that the Autobots remained in their vehicle modes, he would concoct a plan where the Autobots would help evacuate the entire town in their vehicle modes. With no more than four trips in and out of the city, Optimus and the rest of the team carried out the plan without incident. The Autobots then transformed and engaged the approaching Decepticons, whom they easily dispatched. With the city safe, the Autobots moved out to help their comrades at the Decepticon fortress.
The 1984 and 1985 toy lines contained several figures of note. Megatron, the Decepticon leader, originally transformed into a realistic Walther P38 pistol with stock and barrel extensions and scope. The Megatron toy was delayed till 1985 for release in the UK. The Constructicons were the first "gestalt" team in the Transformers line, but were different from most subsequent gestalt teams in that they consisted of six members instead of five. The Autobot Jetfire was repainted from a Macross toy, specifically the VF-1 Valkyrie, and the character was renamed Skyfire in the animated television series program for copyright reasons.

The 1986 line featured another significant change in that many, if not the majority, of the toys were conceived as futuristic vehicles and bore little resemblance to present-day machinery. This was due to changes in the movie and television series, which leaped ahead twenty years to the year 2005. Many have speculated that this change might have been what signaled the beginning of the end for the Transformers, as part of the novelty of the first lines was the realistic vehicles that turned into robots.
The new One-Step Optimus Prime toy transforms from a trailer truck into a robot in just one easy step! The toy features a similar transformation to the other One-Step Optimus Prime and One-Step Changer Movie Hound. The figure is only available as a "Special Edition Figure" in a 6-pack with the One-Step figures of Bumblebee, Steeljaw, Grimlock, Sideswipe, and Underbite, all of which are unchanged from their individual releases. This set was exclusive to Target stores in the United States and to Toys"R"Us stores in Canada.
Part of the Legend Commander Collection sold at Transformers Expo, Convoy is a redeco of Robotmasters G1 Convoy. While most of the paint masks are identical to the original mold, other changes includes replacing the transparent parts into clear blue plastic, and the panel-lining on the grill is stripped off. Unlike the first toy, he does not include a pair of swappable 3mm fists, his missile launcher, or his Calamity Defenser weapon.
A giant-sized transforming Optimus Prime figure is set to be released for the third film. The set comes with a Leader Class-sized Optimus Prime figure and a trailer that transforms into his Omega Combat Armor - both of which combine to form Prime's Ultimate mode.[126] This set will be released on August 1st, 2011, a month after the film's premiere.

Like the original figure, Powermaster Prime is composed of two major components: his truck cab, which transforms into Prime himself, and his trailer, which is essentially a heavily-armed version of the original. The trailer has a fold-down ramp to allow the storage of a smaller Transformer, or perhaps spare accessories. The trailer transforms into a battle station armed with two long black rifles and two grey double-barreled cannons (featuring seating for Powermaster engine figures), all of which Optimus Prime can also wield in his fists.


An absolutely incredible 28 seasons in, The Simpsons writers and producers have had to be unbelievably creative in coming up with a new couch gag for more than 600 episodes. They’ve had a doppleganger Simpsons family walk in on the family, the whole town has absurdly squeezed into their living room, and we’ve toured the inner workings of Homer’s body.
This new smaller mold of Optimus Prime features a similar transformation to the original toy. Unlike most transformable figures in this line, Optimus completely lacks 5mm fist holes. Compared to the finalized toy, the product photo on the back of the box has a number of deco differences, most notably silver thighs and white accents above the front windows in addition to those below. The same box photo and the more deco-accurate stock photo (right) also neglect to fold out his fists, which is the only other step in his two-step transformation.
Inspired by the 1985 promotional version of Optimus Prime that featured Pepsi stickers on his trailer, this outlandish incarnation of Prime is a slightly altered version of Takara's 2005 Pepsi Convoy figure (which represented a different character to Prime). The figure was only sold by Hasbro Toy Shop at various conventions, and given away as a promotional prize by Pepsi, via their Mountain Dew brand.

A standard brick with two rows of four studs delivers a profit to LEGO that is orders of magnitude greater than any specialized element, all because the brick is what LEGO calls a “universal” or “evergreen” element that can be used in so many different sets. A one-of-a-kind, specialized piece, however, generally works in just one or a few sets. Moreover, the cost of molding a standard brick is orders of magnitude cheaper than producing a specialized piece.
There have also been a number of spin-offs based on the toys including a comic book series, an animated television series, and a feature-length animated movie. The original series program was followed by a number of spin-offs with varying levels of popularity. A live-action film series directed by Michael Bay has produced five films, with more planned.
On another plane of existence, Optimus travelled the path to the Matrix, guided by the voice of his old mentor Alpha Trion. The path led him to Grimlock, who had also been killed by Megatron; Prime rescued Grimlock from Kremzeek, the demonic eater of souls. At the gateway to the great beyond, they encountered Bludgeon, who announced that only those who bore the "key to Vector Stigmata" may pass through. Prime realized that the wounds on his body form the key, but the angel insisted that these would grant Prime access. Prime took Grimlock's sword and bestowed the key on Grimlock, allowing the former Autobot King to ascend into the Matrix while Prime stayed behind. Transformers vs. G.I. Joe #12
Millions of years later, Optimus was one of the thirty-five Autobots rebuilt into modern machines by the ship"s computer. Some time later, Jazz reported that he had spotted Decepticon activity at a nearby construction site. Optimus decided to take a proactive angle to their war with the Decepticons, and led the entirety of his troops to the Decepticon base. Once there, they found themselves allowed in by Megatron, feigning a friendly demeanor. Not fooled by Megatron's claims that he was making an honest living heading a construction company, Optimus engaged the evil robots in combat, before being blasted out of the Decepticon base. Optimus and his troops were sent tumbling down the cliffside beneath their feet. The Autobots suffered only minor damage from the fall, and after getting patched up, moved out once more to stop Megatron's plan, now well under way. Megatron was holding millions of humans hostage in a bid to get the Earth to surrender unconditionally to the Decepticons.
This figure was released during the short-lived period when Hasbro was treating the Beast Wars as an extension of the Autobot/Decepticon war, and Optimus Primal was presented as being the same character as Optimus Prime. This was soon relegated to the realms of micro-continuity when the Beast Wars animated series began and clearly established that the two Optimuses were different characters, but the toy remains one that was officially branded as Prime, and is consequently listed here.
Released as part of the Allspark Power refresh of the movie line, First Strike Optimus Prime is an extensive redeco of Voyager class Optimus Prime in a colour scheme based upon Generation 1 and Classics Optimus Prime. The included toy bio describes this coloring as Prime paying tribute to the markings he wore as a young soldier when the war began. Due to the transformation scheme, this figure actually ends up being less like its G1 counterpart in robot mode, a sacrifice made for the slavish redeco of the vehicle mode. You can't have your cake and eat it too, folks.

The "Breakout Battle" set includes another take on a screen-accurate "Scrapyard Optimus Prime", featuring a brown paint wash on tan plastic. The set was a shared exclusive between Toys "R" Us, online retailers such as Big Bad Toy Store, and Myer in Australia. The set was released in Australia, Singapore, and Canada but never actually made it to retail in the U.S. The set also includes Rollbar and a Vehicon.
Optimus & Shreddicus were initially exclusive to San Diego Comic-Con 2017, where they sold out. A small portion of the run had been held for future sales: Hasbro Toy Shop put the set up for sale for about five minutes on August 14 before selling out. The remainder was available at HasCon 2017's exclusives booth, but again they burned through the stock very quickly.
Seibertron member, carytheone, has directed us to CarScoops.com, which has revealed that General Motors are to be auctioning off four of its Transformers Movie Camaros from Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen, Transformers: Dark of the Moon, Transformers: Age of Extinction and Transformers: The Last Knight. The car itself was as much of a star as the Transformers themselves and even the actors, so the interest is bound to be high. These are surely the auctions for “big bucks” Car - Read More
Aside from the Powermaster feature itself, the main gimmick of the toy is the ability of the truck cab to combine with the trailer to form the larger "Super Optimus Prime" figure. This is essentially accomplished by standing the trailer up, folding the cab in half and inserting it into the empty cavity in the trailer's torso, forming an imposing—if almost entirely unposeable—robot form armed with all four weapons. The head of this super robot form is a separate piece which can be stored in the rear of Prime's trailer when not in use. While Hi-Q was always shown plugged into Prime's chest in artwork of this mode (as seen in the picture here), this was actually entirely unnecessary as transforming into Super Optimus Prime didn't require the standard Prime toy's legs to be unlocked.
×