Released as part of the Single Pack assortment, Optimus Prime is a show-accurate, non-transforming die-cast vehicle based on his alternate mode. He features through-axle construction, allowing for super-speedy racing on smooth surfaces, and his car mode is compatible with many tracks and playsets from Hot Wheels and Matchbox. He features 4 wheels, as opposed to the Legion Class' 6 wheels & his larger toy's 10 wheels. Optimus Prime also comes with a collector's flyer.
In "Human Error" Parts 1 and 2, Soundwave captures the Autobots with the help of his minions, Laserbeak and Ratbat, in order to brainwash them. Part of Soundwave's elaborate scheme consists of tricking the Autobots into thinking they have turned human. Optimus Prime's human form is a male caucasian in his early 20s wearing a red jacket. Sari forms a group of "Substitute Autobots" which consists of Scrapper, Wreck-Gar, and Snarl, to rescue them. They free the Autobots from Soundwave's control and Optimus grabbes Laserbeak to engage in a guitar vs. keytar battle with Soundwave, who used Ratbat. Optimus smashes Soundwave and Ratbat into pieces using Laserbeak in guitar mode, but Laserbeak grabs Soundwave's surviving components and flees.

In time-honored tradition, Prime's instructions depict the toy with an alternate "pretooled" head – in this case, a version with the faceplate deployed, used on the Platinum Edition and "Rusty" releases of the figure (see below). Additionally, his packaging stock photography depicts him with extra white/silver paint details, especially on his chest and wheel rims, as well as having gray upper arms with red details, among other differences.
If you’re a child of the ‘80s and grew up with the original The Transformers cartoon, Bumblebee may have been the second Transformer you ever saw-- in the narrative of the show, anyway. In the first episode, “More Than Meets the Eye,” you would’ve started off by watching the memorable opening sequence. There, you first get a quick glimpse of a group of five Autobots in vehicle mode, including Bumblebee alongside Optimus Prime.

Available in the Timelines "Generation 2" 2-pack alongside Sgt. Hound at BotCon 2015, General Optimus Prime is a redeco of Generations Voyager Class Roadbuster based on the cancelled Generation 2 General Optimus Prime toy. He transforms into an off-road vehicle and comes with numerous weapons, all of which peg via 5mm post onto his vehicle rear/legs, shoulders, upper & lower arms, and hands: a spring-loaded, missile-firing launcher, a pistol, a rifle, and two small cannons that respectively form the scope and stock of the rifle. All of his weapons can combine to form an unwieldy superweapon. It was unknown if this figure has the loose ratcheted shoulder joints from the Legends release of the mold.


When Highbrow was captured by the Decepticon leader Scorponok, Optimus Prime agreed to surrender himself to ensure his fellow Autobot's safety. Naturally, though, Prime did not expect Scorponok to hold up his end of the bargain, and he had Hosehead and Fizzle rescue Highbrow while he allowed himself to be imprisoned. Their mission successful, Hosehead and Fizzle then sprang Prime from his cell, and the team beat a hasty retreat. Autobot Hostage
There is some difference of opinion on how the super mode of Leader Class Optimus Prime is supposed to assembled. Takara toys and the television series portrayed with the wings up and his two large guns underslung, however Hasbro later sold the toy with pictures and instructions having the wings down and the guns over the shoulders. Commercials and repainted models by Hasbro went back to the way Takara assembled the super mode. In 2006 a Costco exclusive of Optimus Prime packaged with Wingsaber and a DVD (with Armada Supercon Optimus Prime printed on it!) of the episode United was sold, again with the wings-under gun-over super mode. In Japan a gold chrome edition of this toy was released as a Lucky Draw special.

When the Ark's sensors picked up two Transformer power emissions in the Brazilian rain forest of non-Decepticon origin, Optimus headed into the field to investigate, bringing along Jazz and Blaze. Though their search went poorly at first, the surrounding vegetation interfering with their energy trackers, one of the mystery Transformers soon found them! The source of the readings turned out to be two terrifying robot dinosaurs! As Optimus charged one of them, Megatron and his troops turned up, and blasted the Autobot leader unconscious. He awoke to find the Decepticons fleeing in defeat, and the creatures transformed into their Autobot forms. Grimlock introduced himself and Snarl, but told Optimus that they wouldn't be following the Autobots back to home-base, as they had two more companions to unearth first. Optimus bid him farewell with a handshake before leaving to carry on the war against Megatron. The Dinobots!
A limited edition of the Optimus Prime toy sold as a mail-away exclusive by PepsiCo was made available in North America in 1985. This version of the figure came with a small fold-out leaflet glued to the top-right of the packaging, which contained two Pepsi logo stickers for the buyer to attach to Prime, mid-way through the traditional silver-and-blue stripe on his trailer. Canada also got a version of this promotional figure, but with much larger stickers that were the full length and height of the trailer. This promotion would go on to serve as the inspiration for the Japanese character of Pepsi Convoy, who would in turn be released by Hasbro as a new "Pepsi Optimus Prime" in 2007.
In Another Light, Rodimus finally assumes total control over the Autobots upon Optimus Prime and several of his closest loyalists being jettisoned into space and left near death following the Battle of Decepticon City. However, his reign came to a swift end when the group returned, having been reformatted into the Knights of Unicron. The heroically reborn Optimus, now known as Nova Prime, engaged his usurper in battle and defeated Rodimus, sending him plummeting into Cybertron's depths. However, Rodimus then encountered the malevolent Primus, who enlisted his aid and that of other "true Autobots" in ridding his surface of those he considered vermin-namely, all Decepticons and Autobots not loyal to the same cause. This would lead to an epic battle between Primus' minions and the heroic Transformers of their universe: Galvatron's Decepticons, Nova Prime's Autobots, and a group of Maximals created from Classics Autobots.
A redeco of the Generation 2 Go-Bot Firecracker, Go-Bots Optimus Prime transforms into a red Hot Wheels-sized Lamborghini Diablo. Like all Go-Bots, he features high speed axles and can roll very well across smooth surfaces, but lacks the weight to propel him quickly. He is armed with a small red laser rifle. The plastic colors are a "solid" version of Firecracker's color layout, substituting opaque red for transparent red plastic.
Optimus was made available as a mail-away toy in the "Digital Doom on the Highway to Destruction" offer in the US in 1986 to coincide with the Transformers movie in 1986. He cost $21.50 and 5 robot points, and came with a special Movie Edition Certificate and a round sticker that read " Movie . Edition . Transformer" with the Autobot symbol in the middle. (This item is considered rare.)
The Goldbug change happens in many different continuities, but in the original animated series, it happens like this: while trying to rescue the body of the dead Optimus Prime, which was being held by evil humans, Bumblebee’s damaged by Superion so badly that they have to rebuild him as a more powerful Throttlebot. His new body is much shinier, so a restored Optimus Prime dubs him Goldbug. In the Shattered Glass continuity, he goes evil as Goldbug. And in the IDW comics, confusingly, Goldbug was never affiliated with Bumblebee, but is the leader of the Throttlebots.
Optimus Prime appears in the prequel novel Transformers: Ghosts of Yesterday, where he and a group of Autobots travel in the Ark searching for the Allspark, battling Starscream's Decepticons along the way. While going through a worm hole, the Autobots find themselves encountering a group of humans in a spacecraft reverse-engineered from studying Megatron. With this discovery, Prime realizes the significance of Earth, as both Megatron and the Allspark are there. After saving Bumblebee from a pit of rock-chewing cave worms, Prime battles Starscream. He is about to be gunned down by Starscream and Bonecrusher when he is saved by the human craft. In retaliation, Starscream obliterates it.
This Optimus Prime is a somewhat/nearly screen-accurate redeco of the Leader Class figure, but uses the original Leader mold instead of the Armor Knight retool unfortunately. In comparison to the first Age of Extinction Leader Class figure, his vacuum-metalized front truck bumper, sun visors, robot mode chest, smokestacks and side tanks chest was omitted, revealing the grey plastic underneath. His chromed chest was also stripped of chrome for adding paint operations, his shield was unpainted, and both of his sword and truck mode windows were casted in colorless plastic. He also features some extra silver paint on his robot mode forehead, and his white-colored Autobot insignia is slightly tampographed on the left. And lastly, his light-piping eyes is neutered by blue paint.
Released as part of the "W Convoy" campaign ("Double" Convoy, that is!) alongside a silver chrome version of Energon Rodimus, this gold chrome "Mēki" ("plating") version of the Deluxe size Optimus Prime toy was available only as a prize in a mail-in Robot Points contest. Initially limited to 20 units in the original draw, it appears that many more were made available through toy store drawings, given how many went on to appear on online auction sites through 2005 and 2006.
While Beast Machines was still running in Canada, Japan's Takara made a bid to return to the familiar vehicle-transforming robots concept. In 2000, Car Robots was released. This line was brought by Hasbro to America as the Robots In Disguise series, and featured the Autobots facing off against the Predacons. This series is usually regarded by most as filler while Hasbro contemplated the next direction for Transformers. However most fans of Transformers recognise that most if not all of the toys released from this line were of excellent quality (with the Optimus Prime and Ultra Magnus figures gaining considerable praise), combining the ball-joint articulation with detailed, well painted alternate modes.

As the final new-design Optimus Prime toy from the original Generation 1 era, the Japanese-exclusive Star Convoy was a significant departure from previous versions. This incarnation of Prime transforms into an extended-hood cab truck of made-up model pulling an implausibly large trailer, incorporating the motorized "Microcarrier". Powered by four AA batteries, the Microcarrier drives Star Convoy either forward or backward, spinning a radar dish mounted on the rear of his trailer as he rolls along. Prime's teammate in the Battlestars, Grandus, can link up to the rear of Star Convoy's vehicle mode and be pulled along behind him; Sky Garry can then land atop Grandus, forming a giant vehicle.
Hot Rodimus also appeared in the Japanese exclusive Kiss Players storyline. In the alternate timeline of Kiss Players, Hot Rodimus has given up the Matrix to Ultra Magnus after his actions in hurling Galvatron out of Unicron's body resulted in the Decepticon leader crashing into and devastating Tokyo, rather than landing on Thrull, as seen in the original continuity. He subsequently came to Earth to try to repair relations with the humans, but was instead attacked and nearly killed by a Legion Creature, a hybrid created from Galvatron's Unicron-corrupted cells fusing with local creatures. He was saved by a kiss from the human Li Shao-Shao and reformatted into a body resembling a Ford GT. He went on to battle the Earth Defense Command (an anti-Transformer organization), the Legion - and Optimus Prime himself. Prime had been resurrected in a Kiss Player body, but Hot Rodimus, believing his commander to be dead, thought it was a trick.

A figure of Prime combined with Jetfire was released as part of the second Big Transformers wave, which came with no accessories of its own, but could hold any of the weapons released with the other second wave figures, including Jetfire's gun, the Star Saber, the Skyboom, and the Requiem Blaster. As with the first wave figures, he came packaged with Ramune candy.


It may be that the price of an individual brick has gone down over time, but what does it matter if the size of the bricks has decreased overtime? Sure, the average number of pieces in a set has increased, but how many of those pieces are tiny details? To answer this question, I compiled all the weight data on brickset.com and compared the sets by their price per gram in a similar fashion to how I compared them by price of piece. Below is the chart of my results (prices are in US dollars).
The Transformers Energon figure pen is based on Optimus Prime in his standard Energon body. About the size of a scout class toy, he transforms from truck mode to robot mode almost identically to his mainline toys, apart from the fact that his feet contain the pen and cannot bend. It's really hard to write with, and almost impossible to pose, even though it has full arm articulation. Amusingly, this figure can position itself to transform into his super robot mode (by flipping his helmet on, opening his chest and flipping his hands in), but because there are no versions of the Prime Force drones in this scale, it's impossible to complete him.
QT-M Optimus Prime is a redeco of the GT-R Optimus Prime mold in the colors of the Transformers-sponsored Nissan GT-R used by the Team Mach racing team (a vehicle previously used as the base for non-toy character Mach Five Racing Prime). Like Transformers GT's Safety Prime, this toy was a collaboration with the Super GT racing series and was given away free to young children who attended TakaraTomy-sponsored "Kids Walk" events held by Super GT in the fall season of 2015.
In 1986 the Transformers animated movie had been released, and during the run of the movie, through a pamphlet that came with certain figures, you could order certain Transformers through the mail, such as Optimus Prime among other toys. The toys came in a standard brown mailer box, with items, booklet, and a limited Edition Movie certificate and sticker.

Partially constructed of die-cast metal, this small three inch figurine of Optimus Prime has a CGI-accurate sculpt compared to the larger toys, owing to the fact it does not need to transform at all. He is sculpted with his Ion Blaster in his right fist, and is articulated at the neck, shoulders and waist. He comes with a small movie-style Autobot sigil display stand.
This occurs in a Japanese toy line, animated series, and mobile video game called Q-Transformers. Specifically, the video game is called Q-Transformers: Mystery of Convoy Returns. Both Bumblebee and Optimus Prime are able to switch between their Generation 1 and movie modes in the series and game-- specifically Q-Transformers: Mystery of Convoy Returns. Strangely, though, when he’s in Generation 1 mode, he’s not a Volkswagen but another small, quirky car: a Daihatsu Copen. The show is pretty meta, with the characters being aware that they’re toys and they even talk about the Mystery of Convoy video game that they’re in.
Mission Racer Optimus Prime features a pull-back gimmick by using a rubber band: insert the rubber band onto the front and rear post, then place Optimus Prime onto the ramp and pull his trailer backwards, and release the trailer for allowing the truck to zoom forward. The rubber band also has Optimus Prime's name and the Autobot insignia tampographed oh it.
After his attack on Optimus Prime, Megatron was thrown out of the Ark when Blackarachnia activated the ship's defense systems. However, he was not thrown far enough and the Predacon managed to reenter the Ark and blast the Autobot leader, decisively erasing the Maximals from the timeline. A Change to the Agenda This had the effect of producing a wildly different timeline.
According to the bio printed in the Transformers Collectors Club magazine, Optimus Prime was a member of the Cybertron Dimensional Patrol, but was abducted by Unicron. It is unknown whether he repainted himself yellow before being abducted or if the recoloration was due to the radiation emanating from Unicron, which has a tendency to recolor Cybertronians.

Although no scannable badge is located at his robot mode, the badge was located at his combined mode's left shoulder. The badge was impossible to be scanned while in-package due to the obstruction of the spring-loaded combiner chest kibble. Speaking of impossible, the badges on the re-releases of the toy can't be scanned by the game. The instruction sheet amusingly replaces Optimus's last picture in the transformation process with Sideswipe.


Produced by the Chupa Chups lollipop company, this small version of Prime is essentially a battery-powered "holder" for lollipops, which fit behind his head and are spun around by a motor that activates when his pelvis is pressed. Prime has articulation in his shoulders, and his fists feature small holes that allow him to hold and store two more lollipops, in addition to the strawberry sucker he comes with. Weirdly, his Matrix compartment is open instead of having the grill front-and-center.
The seldom seen 5th season re-airing of the show featured the G1 episodes retold by a stop-motion Powermaster Optimus Prime to the live-action youngster Tommy Kennedy. Although no back story was ever provided for how Prime became a Powermaster, the new sequences are said to take place after the four previous seasons. This indicates that Prime became a Powermaster in the original Sunbow continuity.
the one the left was a design that i hated from the start. just doesnt look like what a Transformer is supposed be. the one on the right is almost there but not quite. a very welcoming design though. its what Prime should have looked like from the start. To say it is too 80s, well the first film should have taken place in the 80s, not present day. The Transformers are icons of the 80s. You make Cybertron in the future tense all futuristic and alien-ish and whatnot, but on earth you make it in the 80s.
A non-transforming model kit of Optimus Prime by Takara Tomy, sold exclusively in Japan. The kit comes with a pre-assembled inner frame that features a high rate of poseability similar to Master Grade Gundam model kits. The kit comes with two swords and two different sets of attachments for them: one set for the forearms and the other to replace the hands. Pre-ordered units of the first batch came with battle hooks.[138]
His trailer opens up into his Combat Deck, which features a missile-armed repair drone pod (with seating for one) mounted upon a boom lift arm. Situated in the base of this boom is a spring-loaded launcher that can be used to launch Roller out of the Combat Deck. Roller himself has seating for 4 passengers, and can be equipped to carry Optimus Prime's rifle or a fuel pump. The interior space of the trailer allows storage room for one Autobot car.
In 2002, 3H secured the official Transformers convention license as well as licenses to produce comic books and start a fan club. Optimus Prime appeared in Transformers Collectors Club comics, a comic released by 3H enterprises. In the comic, he is the same Optimus Prime from the Robots in Disguise continuity, but is taken to the Transformers: Universe reality.
Nonetheless, I remain a big fan of Lego and although I think they have somewhat moved away from their roots with the excess of licensed products (and the earlier licensed products were, in my opinion, not very good because they contained too many specialized non-generic pieces that weren’t useful for generic building. But that situation is improved and in particular we have found the Star Wars sets to be of most value for generic building, because they generally have very few really specialized pieces (although to be fair the sets are most useful for building other spaceships, etc).
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