The SS-03 version of Takara's Deluxe-class Optimus figure, based on the Anniversary release, was released in Hasbro markets in a two pack with the smaller Japanese Megatron figure. There are some tiny but notable differences between this and the Anniversary figure; the Hasbro version uses a more neutral dark-gray for the main body as opposed to the Takara version's blue-tinted dark-gray, plain dark-blue plastic rather than dark-blue-with-sparkles, and plain yellow paint for the cab's lights rather than sparkly-yellow/gold.
Outside the United States, this set was available in a thinner rectangular box. It contained all the original accessories from the American release, but not the DVD. An English-only version of this packaging format was available in Asia and Australia (initially only available at Myer stores, but later also at Toys"R"Us, Kmart and Target, eventually at drastically reduced prices), while a bilingual English/French packaging variant was available in Canada, still including—though not advertised on the packaging—the (English only) comic book.
In a world where the Transformers' war settled into a series of friendly competitive races known as the Transformers GT, Optimus Prime became the GT Transformer known as GT-R Prime. As a racer he was known for his serious but sometimes hot-blooded personality and his skillful use of the Impact Wrench Gun, though he maintained an honorable policy never to fire directly at an opposing racer's body. Like other racers, GT-R Prime put a limit on his own strength by separating his Matrix into a GT Sister, creating his partner Misaki.
The more interesting "Sky Master Mode", revealed in the "Cybertron Satellite" segment of "Phantom Transformation! Mind-Diving", has him using O.P. as a blaster, two B.2s as leg-thrusters, and two sets of C.L./Jida(!) combinations as back-mounted jet packs. The AMW versions of C.L. and Jida, while not as color-coordinated, are a far more economical option than buying two of each Cliffjumper. Good luck with the second B.2. This mode was created as a "counter" to the aerial combatant Starscream, along with the Energon Sniper Combo Weapon (despite it being a Decepticon-Micron-formed weapon). Apparently, the "Arms Up Mission" game isn't picky about factions.

Optimus Prime is then informed that Megatron has infected the core of Cybertron with dark energon and is given the task to undo the damage done. After rescuing Omega Supreme, Optimus, Ironhide, and Prowl fight their way to the core, but it's too late. The core informs Optimus that it is far too corrupted. It can repair itself by shutting down, but it will take millions of years. By that time, Cybertron will have to become cold, barren, and uninhabitable. The core gives Optimus a small piece of itself, saying it will still survive as long as the piece does. Optimus accepts the burden and the core relinquishes the Autobot Matrix of Leadership.
The Premium Series Optimus Prime is both a retool and a redeco of the Leader Class Optimus Prime toy. The major selling point is a more movie-accurate head sculpt with longer ears and detailing based on the final CG head design, and a flip-out energy sword to replace the ion blaster that was included with previous versions of the toy. This energy sword is detachable and attaches where the Ion Blaster did, compatible with non-premium Optimus Prime Leader-class-based releases. Because his ears are much longer, the truck roof panel that hides his head now has two holes cut into so the head can fit inside the cabin.
Apparently, early plans for the shield were to have it colored gold and silver, but it was later changed to gray and red. When a hand-painted prototype of the toy was first displayed at the 2013 New York Comic Con, the shield was colored yellow and silver; in addition, the original versions of the official Hasbro stock photos also depict the gold color, but the versions featured on the back of the toy's packaging were edited so they would accurately depict the final toy's colors for the shield. Meanwhile, the versions of the stock photos provided to websites and online retailers depict the shield in its final colors for the robot mode, whereas the vehicle mode photo is the unedited version featuring the shield's original colors. Furthermore, UK-based retailer Argos also featured unedited versions of the stock photos for both modes in one of its catalogs, causing some confusion among fans.[5] Sometimes, the spring loaded "Automorph" feature in his head is too strong and causes the head to fly off...
Available with Grimlock, this Optimus Prime is a redeco (or possibly a repaint) of the figure above, featuring extra paint applications on the chest and thighs, and he features a different flame pattern on his side doors. His Autobot insignia is now tampographed on his right arm. The cyberglyphs on his front hood is confusingly translated as "PRIME". The 2-pack also comes with a card, which the glyphs being decoded as "DINOBOTS". Optimus Prime and Grimlock also saw release as a Toys"R"Us Japan exclusive, making this Optimus Prime redeco/slight retool to be first sold at Japanese markets.
Simon Furman's "Alignment", a text story available through Transforce, a British Transformers convention, mentions Prime falling during what was intended to be the final conflict with the Decepticons at Pinea Omicron, long after the events of the Generation 2 comic book. He managed to defeat Galvatron II, but in doing so, was damaged such that Grimlock had to engage a stasis field around him to save his flickering Spark, making Prime a living war monument.
Released alongside a Sega Mega Drive version of Megatron and outside of any other toyline, "Optimus Prime featuring Original PlayStation" transforms from robot to a scaled-down non-functional Sony PlayStation video game console. He features an opening disc compartment and comes with two accessories, a memory card and a controller that splits in two and attaches to his lower arms to act as blasters.
Hot Rod first appeared in the Headmasters limited series as one of the Autobot crew led by Fortress Maximus. He became a Targetmaster in the fourth and final issue of the series. However, his Targetmaster partner is called Sparks, instead of Firebolt (though the UK comic would occasionally call him Firebolt). Hot Rod made sporadic appearances, with a few UK stories starring him as the lead, but most of those were set in the past or future. Kup's Story revealed the first meeting between Kup and Hot Rod, and how Hot Rod's influence shook Kup out of depression; and Ark Duty starred Hot Rod and set up the creation of Autobot City. Hot Rod debuted in the main continuity after the loss of many wars to the Underbase powered Starscream, as part of Fortress Maximus' group. He served as an eager soldier who idolized Optimus. However, he was killed during the Decepticon ambush on Klo in the last issue of the Marvel G1 comic, only to be resurrected by Prime and the Last Autobot.
If there was one thing the toy planes of yonder were lacking, it was controllability. Guaranteed crash landings and the subsequent walks of shame to go pick up the pieces started to wear a little thin. The advent of radio-control provided an answer for that. But for model builders Aviation Design, that was child's play. Hense, the birth of the FALCON 7X business jet.

Similar to the Activators toyline, One-Step Changer Optimus Prime features a spring-loaded transformation. He features swivel articulation in the head and both arms. He shares a similar (not identical) transformation with his fellow One-Step changer, Hound. Also, due to his transformation scheme, his shoulders can be pushed forward (the arms is pushed on the same time), which also allows him to wield a close ranged weapons with longer handles with both hands.


LEGO has changed a lot in its history. It started as a wooden toy company before it discovered the benefits of molded plastic. Since the advent of the brick, we have been able to build everything from houses, to spaceships, to working robots. The increased detail and wider product line has allowed for the blossoming of the idea of LEGO as an art medium7. LEGO bricks walk the line between giving people more pieces that can be used to add detail and restricting the pieces to inspire creativity. There is a balance that can be seen through the amazing works, both large and small, that can be done with a bit of patience and an eye for plastic.

Hot on the heels of their licensing deals with Pepsi and Nike, TakaraTomy got themselves a slice of Apple™ pie and released Convoy —playing iPod speaker— as part of their small, musically-themed Music Label line. This version of Prime is an all-white redeco of the original Generation 1 cab robot, which (much like the "Marine Version" of Prime from the Sports Label line) makes it seem like he ought to be Ultra Magnus. The figure is actually even derived from the retool of the mold created for the original Ultra Magnus figure, as distinguished by the elongated hubcap pegs on the front wheels. Like Pepsi Prime before it, the figure's fists now store in peg holes on the under side of its trailer. The toy lacks any of the original Prime's stickers (even the silver stripe on his chest is now a paint operation) and includes the original thick-barrelled version of Prime's blaster. The toy features a brand new headsculpt based on the 20th Anniversary Prime figure, given additional poseability not previously seen on the figure by being mounted on a ball joint.

In "Endgame" 2-parter, Ratchet builds Optimus a jetpack attachment to help in the coming battle against the Decepticons. After some initial difficulty, Optimus is able to get the hang of the device, only to be shot down by Starscream's female clone, Slipstream. Though Ratchet urges Optimus to use the Magnus Hammer, he is reluctant to do so, given his past with Ultra Magnus. In the end, he wields the weapon as the Lugnut-controlled Omega Supreme clones land on Earth. During the fight, Optimus manages to master the Magus Hammer's power in order t overwhelms Megatron to the point of being acknowledged by name. After a devastating battle, the last remaining Omega clones self-destruct due to Starscream's intervention. With Prowl's sacrifice, the Allspark is rebuilt into one as it forms a barrier around the Omega clone, along with Optimus and Megatron. Prowl's spirit pulls Optimus from the bubble just as the clone self-destructs with Megatron still trapped inside. Prime laments Prowl's passing before defeating a heavily damaged Megatron and sparing him the deathblow, saying that Megatron does not deserve the "easy way out". He and his team return to Cybertron with Omega Supreme, the captured Decepticons, and Prowl's body and are greeted as the hero he had wished to be so long ago. The reconstructed Allspark, having a structure similar to the G1 incarnation of the Autobot Matrix of Leadership, is hung around his neck.


As one of the first Transform Jr toys, this version of Optimus Prime was released under the early name for the series, Transform Gōkin. As a smaller, simplified version of the original Generation 1 Prime figure intended as a low-cost alternative for younger children, Prime features a similar transformation, with a removable head in addition to fists, but lacks rubber tires and translucent windows. As with most other Transform Jr figures, he lacked any of his major accessories, coming only with his rifle and a cardboard replacement for his trailer that had to be assembled by the buyer.
Optimus has the ability to change any part of his robotic body into a tool or gadget. He has swing lines in his wrists. His wrists can also fire capture bolas. His arsenal includes a grappler, fire extinguisher and a negative friction spray. Unlike in all the previous series, his face can almost always be seen, because his mouthplate is retractable like in the 2007 live action film.
Based upon the "Protoform" (Cybertronian) appearances of the Transformers in the Movie, Protoform Optimus Prime transforms into his "entry" mode. This mode somewhat resembles a cybertronic truck, with false wheels sculpted onto the sides, and Optimus Prime's trademark windows in front. A flame decoration piece fits to the back of the "vehicle", creating the illusion of a flaming comet's tail. The bottom of the vehicle has small wheels to roll the toy across smooth surfaces. Oddly, it has NO automorph gimmick at all, a feature most main-line figures have.
In April 2007, photos of a repainted Alternators Mirage, in a color scheme similar to Kiss Players Hot Rodimus, and in Alterators-style "fishbowl" packaging began to appear on the internet. Simply called Rodimus, the 27th Alternator lacks almost all of the Kiss Players accessories, including the fishing pole, but keeps the new head sculpt. This figure also sports the classic "flame" detailing in lieu of the Kiss Player's white stripes, while the vanity plate reads "TOO HOT". Rodimus was first sold as a convention exclusive at the 2007 San Diego Comic-Con. The Monday after the convention, it was made available on the Hasbro Toy Shop website, where it would sell out that same morning. The instructions present an alternate name for the figure: Rodimus Prime; whether this is merely an oversight is unknown.

Thanks to TFW2005 user Fc203, we have some screencaps from what appears to be a stop-motion review video featuring Studio Series Shatter, among other Transformers and non-Transformers toys. The screencaps give us a good look at her robot and alt mode as well as a few poses. Like her partner Dropkick, Shatter only comes with one alt mode. However, that alt mode is her car mode and not her aircraft mode; whereas Dropkick is the opposite. She also seems to be sporting a bit more of a generic head that isn’t quite movie-accurate, but the rest of the figure seems to pay a good deal of homage to her pre-jet mode on-screen model.

There may be two things you didn’t know in this one: 1) Bumblebee is in the Transformers Hall of Fame; and 2) There’s a Transformers Hall of Fame. The shrine to all things Transformers was the brainchild of Hasbro, the American toy company that worked with Japanese toy company Tomy to create the Transformers in 1984. Starting in 2010, they wanted to honor not just popular characters, but also the real people behind the toys, TV shows, comics, and films.
He comes with a shield with a fold-out handle, allowing Optimus to hold onto it with either hand in robot mode. It has a simple transformation gimmick for vehicle mode which is activated by pressing a button at the top of the shield, causing the sides to spring outwards. In vehicle mode, the shield can be laid flat across the bed of the truck, attaching via a post on the back onto the truck’s trailer hitch. Alternatively, the bumpers on the shield can be rotated outwards, and the front can be bent down in order to form a new front end and hood for "battle vehicle mode", resembling the Stealth Force vehicle modes seen in Dark of the Moon.

In reorganizing the company, LEGO became more efficient. The data shows that they have been able to standardize costs and it is likely that they were able to hedge the price of plastic against future price fluctuations. In protecting their business, they have also been able to normalize prices for their customers. A stable price is good for everyone; it helps LEGO ensure that future production costs are budgeted for and it helps the consumer manage their budget. This allows LEGO to protect and grow its market share.

This Japanese e-Hobby exclusive is a redeco of Targetmaster Kup, made to represent the character [[Optimus Prime#The Transformers cartoon|Orion Pax]] from the cartoon episode War Dawn. He transforms into a Cybertronic pickup-truck thing. His truck bed has a peg-hole to mount his partner Barrelroller, who also serves as a hand-held weapon. The set also came with a re-deco of Wheelie as Dion.
Reissued in 2003 as part of Takara's Transformers Collection line of reissues. This version (#13 in the Collection series) was retooled from the 2000/2002 Rodimus Major tooling in order to make the fists and engine block hole wide enough to equip Firebolt. In addition, the original 2 guns had their posts modified so that a Targetmaster Hot Rod could still use them, if the owner chose to.
Produced to coincide with the 20th anniversary of The Transformers: The Movie and its release on DVD by Sony, this edition of Prime is a redeco of his 20th Anniversary figure. It replaces the original's metallic paint with flatter colors and does away with any and all vacuum-metalized plastic, as well as altering several other small details across the body, like the color of the lights on his feet and chest.
Mission Racer Optimus Prime features a pull-back gimmick by using a rubber band: insert the rubber band onto the front and rear post, then place Optimus Prime onto the ramp and pull his trailer backwards, and release the trailer for allowing the truck to zoom forward. The rubber band also has Optimus Prime's name and the Autobot insignia tampographed oh it.
My 6 year old son has recently gotten into the classic transformers. He has asked for an original Optimus Prime for Christmas. I can’t bring myself to spend the money on an original 1984 model, but would like to know if the reissues from China (sample in the link) are quality products. I’m not looking for a masterpiece, but i don’t want something that will fall apart within a month or so. Thanks in advance for the helpOptimus Prime
Outside the United States, this set was available in a thinner rectangular box. It contained all the original accessories from the American release, but not the DVD. An English-only version of this packaging format was available in Asia and Australia (initially only available at Myer stores, but later also at Toys"R"Us, Kmart and Target, eventually at drastically reduced prices), while a bilingual English/French packaging variant was available in Canada, still including—though not advertised on the packaging—the (English only) comic book.
The character of Optimus Prime first appears in the 2007 Transformers film as the leader of the Autobots in the search for the Allspark. He intends to destroy it, even if it means sacrificing himself, before the Decepticons can use it to create a new army to conquer the universe. After arriving and scanning a Peterbilt truck, Optimus greets Sam Witwicky and Mikaela Banes, introducing his men and explaining why they have come to Earth. During the final battle, Optimus slays the hate-filled Decepticon Bonecrusher and faces his ancient enemy, Megatron. Unable to match Megatron in combat, Optimus urges Sam to push the Allspark into his chest, which will destroy them both. Instead, Sam rams the Allspark into Megatron's chest, destroying it and killing the Decepticon leader. The film ends with Optimus sending out a deep-space signal, inviting other Autobots to join them on Earth.
Optimus made his way to the Primal Basilica, where he found Perceptor standing over the Mistress of Flame's battered corpse. Unable to do anything for her, Prime activated the Basilica's defenses as a means of stalling Trypticon. Learning from Perceptor that Rodimus had given up the Matrix, the two entered the chamber of the Chorus of the Primes to have the Matrix returned to him. Desperate Actions However, Optimus revealed the Matrix was not for him, but rather for Perceptor, as he wanted to make sure it would be taken as far away from Trypticon's grasp as possible. He guided Perceptor to a secret exit from the Basilica and sent the scientist on his way. Run for Our Lives Warned by the Chorus to "beware the power of the Primes", Optimus charged back towards the battlefield and began attacking Trypticon, rescuing Victorion. Optimus led the Combiners in battle against Trypticon, but the Titan managed to hit him, sending him hurtling towards some sharp rubble. Thankfully, he was caught at the last moment by Fortress Maximus. In Good Hands
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