Hey now, dont lump all geewunners together lol. Im all about g1, and love seeing g1 inspired, yet evolved designs. Such as the bee movie, and the recent toy lines. That said, I do respect others opinions. My son prefers bayverse on most and thats ok. I hate bayverse designs (except barricade and nitro zues in the last movie, badasses) but alot of people grew up on that, and it makes hasbro money, so no reason to hate it all together.
In the Japanese exclusive Transformers: The Headmasters storyline (which replaced the "Rebirth" finale in Japanese continuity), Hot Rod appeared as part of Optimus Prime's inner circle. When Galvatron and his Headmaster warriors launched a devastating attack on Cybertron, Vector Sigma was damaged, and Hot Rod was sent to Earth to retrieve the Matrix. Recovering it, he returned it to Prime, only to be surprised when the ghost of Alpha Trion once again reformatted him into Rodimus Prime to help Optimus. After Prime's second death, Rodimus once again took command of the Autobots. However, when Scorponok destroyed Vector Sigma, Rodimus decided to leave the war, and left Fortress Maximus in command of the Autobots.
Legends Class Optimus Prime is based on his original Generation 1 appearance. He features a fake grill for his robot mode, and his large legs result in a fairly thick and compact truck bed. He is part of "Reveal the Shield", a subline that outfits all its toys with rubsigns, and in this case, it's located on the left side of the truck/his left elbow.
Aside from the Powermaster feature itself, the main gimmick of the toy is the ability of the truck cab to combine with the trailer to form the larger "Super Optimus Prime" figure. This is essentially accomplished by standing the trailer up, folding the cab in half and inserting it into the empty cavity in the trailer's torso, forming an imposing—if almost entirely unposeable—robot form armed with all four weapons. The head of this super robot form is a separate piece which can be stored in the rear of Prime's trailer when not in use. While Hi-Q was always shown plugged into Prime's chest in artwork of this mode (as seen in the picture here), this was actually entirely unnecessary as transforming into Super Optimus Prime didn't require the standard Prime toy's legs to be unlocked.
TakaraTomy released another reissue based on the Encore version as part of their Chronicle line in 2011, lacking the original Generation 1 trailer. Instead, the Chronicle version was available in a two-pack with Dark of the Moon Deluxe Class Optimus Prime and a new trailer that could be used by both Optimuses, thanks to a retooled trailer hitch on the Generation 1 Optimus Prime figure.
Optimus Prime is the fictional protagonist of the Transformers: Robots in Disguise (Fire Convoy in the original Japanese version) branch of the Transformers universe.[8] Based on the character of the same name, Prime once again leads the Autobots against the Decepticons. His voice actor, Neil Kaplan, does his voice in a style reminiscent of that of Peter Cullen, the voice of the original Optimus Prime. Wired Magazine nominated Fire Convoy as one 12 most ridiculous Transformers ideas of all time.[9]
Like the original Warrior Class Optimus Prime, the figure features an undocumented feature: His axe can be stored on his vehicle mode trailer. Additional features include storing the axe onto either of his leg hooks, combining the launcher with either of the swords at their hilt, and storing the launcher underneath the vehicle. In a neat bit of engineering, he can fully transform with his swords attached.
But it is scary to think that there is a strong possibility they will look at redoing almost every Masterpiece now if this is a success. The MP+ releases have me feeling tired. I don’t have to get them but I have a completionist mentality. But a redo... I’m almost ready to check out of MP completely. I waited so long to get six seekers done pretty well to me. Now there’s a chance they will redo them. And soundwave. I sure hope I’m just being a worry wart.

When Highbrow was captured by the Decepticon leader Scorponok, Optimus Prime agreed to surrender himself to ensure his fellow Autobot's safety. Naturally, though, Prime did not expect Scorponok to hold up his end of the bargain, and he had Hosehead and Fizzle rescue Highbrow while he allowed himself to be imprisoned. Their mission successful, Hosehead and Fizzle then sprang Prime from his cell, and the team beat a hasty retreat. Autobot Hostage


He made it out of the building and ran into the real Sunstreaker, who blasted the 2 clones following Hot Rod. Sunstreaker ignored Hot Rod's warning about Scorponok's army and stormed into the building so Hot Rod painfully wired himself to send a distress signal. When Sunstreaker's real head was later disabled by Hunter, the Headmaster clones shut down, which Hot Rod explained to Grimlock. The group was surprised by the arrival of Shockwave, but Ultra Magnus had heard Hot Rod's distress call and was on his way to Earth. After Scorponok knocked out Sludge and Grimlock tended to him, the remaining Dynobots offered Hot Rod a lift aboard the Monsterbots' ship. He refused though, and made it back into Machination HQ to take care of something "personal". He eventually found Scorponok's real head. Hunter also showed up and let Hot Rod know how to disable it, but before he could do so, Scorponok grabbed him. Before Scorponok could crush Hot Rod's head, the Dynobots showed up and began to battle Scorponok. Hot Rod told Swoop which wires to sever, and he did just that, reducing Scorponok to a catatonic state. Ultra Magnus arrived took everyone back aboard his ship, which later docked with the Ark-32. Within 3 days, Hot Rod was fully repaired, with a new body form design.
In late 1993, Hasbro relaunched the Transformers franchise with the Generation 2 line, with production again largely being done by Takara. The subgroups concept was done away with for the first year, but there were no new molds or characters. Generation 2 re-used the molds for many of the characters from the 1984 and 1985 line, but with mostly different color schemes and finishes, as well as different weapons and accessories. Megatron's figure was released later on. As noted previously, Megatron's original alternate mode, or "transformation identity", was a handgun with attachments, but in Generation Two, this was changed to a tank due to safety and security concerns. Most of the 1994 figures were re-releases or recolors of European G1 releases.

Megatron is captured by the Autobot Targetmasters in the episode "Do Over". When Optimus learns Megatron has been captured, he rushes to be the one who kills his old enemy, despite the closing launch window of the Ark. When confronted by Optimus Prime, Megatron attempts to use the Autobot Targetmaster Nightstick to shoot the Autobot leader, but Nightstick takes control of Megatron's arm. Megatron then tricks Optimus into using Megatron's own sword to cut his hand off, freeing him from Nightstick. Optimus fails to kill his foe and misses the launching of the Ark, which has been taken over by Rodimus. He then takes out his anger on Blurr.


Undeniably, the most iconic of Bumblebee’s alternate modes is his original: the small but always reliable classic yellow Volkswagen Beetle. It was evocative of his personality, always striving to go above and beyond what everyone perceived to be the limits of his size. These days, thanks to the Michael Bay live-action movie franchise, he’s known as a modern Chevrolet Camaro, which looks cool but as a strong muscle car deviates from his personality. At least it’s still yellow? Bay says he didn’t want him to be a Beetle anymore because there was already an iconic movie Beetle: Herbie the Love Bug.

Generation 2 Optimus Prime comes with all his original accessories, as well as two major new play features. To increase his arsenal, he is armed with a pair of black missile launchers that fit in his fists and fire red spring-loaded missiles; these launchers were retooled from the G.I. Joe figure Barricade. Secondly, he comes with an electronic "sound and lights module" that can either plug into the front of the trailer (where it resembles the air conditioners used on refrigerated trailers), or hook onto Optimus's back in robot mode (via a new slot sculpted into the cab robot). Unfortunately, the soundbox is heavy enough that doing so can easily overpower Prime's hip joints, causing him to topple backward. The soundbox features a large, vacuum metalized Autobot symbol on its front, and three grey buttons which trigger two flashing red LEDs on either side of the module, and a trio of sound effects: a truck engine noise, a laser gun sound effect and a garbled voice that said "I am Optimus Prime!". The module also features ports on either side into which the missile launchers can peg.
This series introduced the dangerous Predacon faction, robotic dragons and mythical creatures that posed a threat to Autobot and Decepticon alike. In response, the 'Bots and 'Cons don new armor (the Autobots in spiky, over-weaponized armor reminiscent of Mad Max, while the Decepticons take on more beastly traits) and are armed with new gimmick-laden launching/spinning weapons. On-package bios were reduced in length to just a sentence or two, and the instruction sheets instead feature facts about one of the figure's main weapons, as well as a chapter of the Tales of the Beast Hunters prose story.
The energy of the explosion absorbed by the virus, the Autobots dug themselves out and set about recovering their fellows whom Megatron had used to power the cyber-virus in its early stages. Ironhide passed on a message from Megatron — there was a surprise in store for the Autobot leader. Optimus and some Autobots including Superion sped to San Francisco, where Megatron had unleashed Devastator. As Prime battled Megatron, he took time to save three humans who were threatened by falling debris, only for the humans to turn on him. The defeat of Superion turned the tide of the battle against the Autobots. Prime Directive #4
The designs for the original 28 figures were made by Kojin Ono, Takashi Matsuda, Hideaki Yoke, Hiroyuki Obara, and Satoshi Koizumi. Hasbro would go on to buy the entire toy line from Takara, giving them sole ownership of the Transformers toy-line, branding rights, and copyrights, while in exchange, Takara was given the rights to produce the toys and the rights to distribute them in the Japanese market.

The Japanese release of the figure also underwent the changes in weapon shapes, but never featured a silver Roller; instead, their original release of Prime featured a Diaclone-style Roller without the two rear pegs, and the differently-shaped launcher that accommodated him, before a running change switched over to the Hasbro version of the mold. Finally, in some European countries, Prime sported red feet, as opposed to his traditional blue; this version of the figure is also known in some cases to feature a differently-painted forehead crest which leaves the three central indentations unpainted blue.

This straight reissue of the original Optimus Prime figure was released in Hasbro's European markets in the early 1990s, at the same time as many other Generation 1 figures were being re-released as "Classics". Oddly, although he shares their golden packaging, Prime is not actually identified as a "Classics" figure anywhere on his box, but is generally considered to be part of the sub-line for simplicity's sake.


The San Diego Comic-Con 2017 exclusive Optimus Prime figure is another redeco of the Premier Edition figure, which aims for a more movie accurate look than the original by still sharing the same paint masks, but replacing the chest's deco with flames and adding extra paint applications on the legs, arms, chest, head, tire rims, both sides of the engine compartment, and the sword and shield... but for some reason still sports the movie-inaccurate blue 'collar', as well as the smaller, less accurate vehicle flame tampographs instead of the more movie-accurate ones used on Dark Optimus Prime. His Autobot insignia is also moved on the upper back section of the air dam. He is packaged in a stylish, display-case-like-box similar to later Transformers: Alternators releases and the Hasbro Toy Shop/SDCC 2011 exclusive figure.


In time-honored tradition, Prime's instructions depict the toy with an alternate "pretooled" head – in this case, a version with the faceplate deployed, used on the Platinum Edition and "Rusty" releases of the figure (see below). Additionally, his packaging stock photography depicts him with extra white/silver paint details, especially on his chest and wheel rims, as well as having gray upper arms with red details, among other differences.
The 1984 and 1985 toy lines contained several figures of note. Megatron, the Decepticon leader, originally transformed into a realistic Walther P38 pistol with stock and barrel extensions and scope. The Megatron toy was delayed till 1985 for release in the UK. The Constructicons were the first "gestalt" team in the Transformers line, but were different from most subsequent gestalt teams in that they consisted of six members instead of five. The Autobot Jetfire was repainted from a Macross toy, specifically the VF-1 Valkyrie, and the character was renamed Skyfire in the animated television series program for copyright reasons.
Arms Master Optimus's "Space Blaster Mode" is a mode designed for fighting in outer space, introduced in the Cybertron Satellite segment of "Infinite Transformation! Multiplying Enemies". He wears R.A. and Shining R.A. on his shoulders as wings, C.L. and C.L. GR on his back as thrusters, and B.H. and B.H. B on his feet as... more thrusters. His weapon of choice in this mode is the Matrix Blaster.
One more thought: LEGO is a Danish company. The fluctuations in the price of LEGO such as the big bump around 1985-7 in Figures 1 and 2 could be because of a change in exchange rates. The conversion rate between the Danish Kronor and the US$ went from over 10 in 83 and 84 to less than 7 in 86 and 87. LEGO might have been slow to respond to changes in exchange rates, leading to the temporary bump. If you’d like to share data we can redo your graphs in DKK.
After their own Optimus Prime disappeared, Scavenger and Smokescreen discovered an alternate version of Optimus Prime lying unconscious and barely alive in Autobase Earth. Though Red Alert did what he could, the mysterious Prime reactivated only long enough to utter a cryptic statement about the walls crumbling and the coming of chaos, then died. Worlds Collide, Part 1 of 4
There are two versions of the voice changer helmet with two different pre-recorded voices. An earlier release features a voice similar to Garry Chalk, while the later release features the voice of Peter Cullen. The latter version has modified packaging under the 'Try Me!' blurb, stating it has 'Real Movie Voice!', though the updated version has also appeared in the original packaging without the 'Real Movie Voice!' notice.

On a Cybertron dominated by Shockwave and the Decepticons, Optimus Prime and the Autobots took on the roles of resistance fighters. Cobra experimentation transported a contingent of Cobras and G.I. Joes to Cybertron and destabilized Teletran 3, which led to the computer sending several Transformers to Earth across different time periods. When Optimus Prime saw Jazz get zapped by Teletran 3, he leapt to rescue his soldier, only to be transported away as well. G.I. Joe vs. the Transformers II #1 A team made up of Joes and Cobra agents were sent back and found Optimus Prime and the Stunticons in 1930s-era Chicago, disguised as period cars and trucks. The Stunticons chased Prime and the Joes around the city until everything was wrapped up with bullets, a collapsed bridge and some dynamite. G.I. Joe vs. the Transformers II #2
Inspired by the 1985 promotional version of Optimus Prime that featured Pepsi stickers on his trailer, this outlandish incarnation of Prime is a slightly altered version of Takara's 2005 Pepsi Convoy figure (which represented a different character to Prime). The figure was only sold by Hasbro Toy Shop at various conventions, and given away as a promotional prize by Pepsi, via their Mountain Dew brand.
Hot Rod first appeared in the Headmasters limited series as one of the Autobot crew led by Fortress Maximus. He became a Targetmaster in the fourth and final issue of the series. However, his Targetmaster partner is called Sparks, instead of Firebolt (though the UK comic would occasionally call him Firebolt). Hot Rod made sporadic appearances, with a few UK stories starring him as the lead, but most of those were set in the past or future. Kup's Story revealed the first meeting between Kup and Hot Rod, and how Hot Rod's influence shook Kup out of depression; and Ark Duty starred Hot Rod and set up the creation of Autobot City. Hot Rod debuted in the main continuity after the loss of many wars to the Underbase powered Starscream, as part of Fortress Maximus' group. He served as an eager soldier who idolized Optimus. However, he was killed during the Decepticon ambush on Klo in the last issue of the Marvel G1 comic, only to be resurrected by Prime and the Last Autobot.
The project was crowd-funded through Japanese crowd-funding site Makuake[11]. For 5,400 yen, contributors received an INFOBAR Optimus Prime, or for 16,200 yen, received INFOBAR Optimus Prime, INFOBAR Megatron and INFOBAR Bumblebee, the only way to obtain the last two items. The project received one million yen in the first 24 hours, ultimately topping out at over 32 million yen.
If Optimus ordered his troops to come to the humans’ aid, they found themselves taking part in a struggle in futility, as the entire town was near-weightless, meaning they couldn’t put the humans anywhere where they wouldn’t float away once more. Then, the Autobots heard Decepticons approaching. Helpless in their current position, the Autobots were quickly eradicated by the Decepticons. 
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