Over the course of the next twenty years, the Decepticons succeeded in seizing control of all of Cybertron, forcing the Autobots to operate from their new city on Earth and two bases on Cybertron's moons. In the Earth year 2005, Prime, stationed on Moonbase One, dispatched troops to Earth to acquire energy for an upcoming strike on Cybertron. The Decepticons, however, got wind of the plan and used the shuttle run to attack Autobot City. A distress call summoned Prime and support troops to Earth. In the fearsome, ensuing, epic battle with Megatron, Optimus Prime sustained fatal wounds, but not before turning the tide of battle and forcing the Decepticons to flee. Despite the efforts of Perceptor, Optimus Prime went offline after passing the Matrix and role of leader to Ultra Magnus. His last words were "Until that day... 'till all are one." The Matrix later fell into the hands of Galvatron, a recreated Megatron, and was finally taken back by the young Autobot Hot Rod, who became Rodimus Prime after bearing the Matrix. In season 3, set a year after the events in The Transformers: The Movie, Rodimus was the new leader of the Autobots.

The mold suffers from a minor design oversight, wherein the rear Nissan badge collides with his left leg strut when the left foot is hinged over and pegged into a clear plastic socket during transformation, with the results being that the connection is slightly crooked, isn't very secure, and sometimes pops off, and that the crooked pegging often causes the socket to crack.
Optimus Prime was the central figure of Kabaya's final Cybertron candy toy series, Change Galaxy, which was themed around his combinations with Leobreaker and Wing Saber. In addition to being transformable (again, through partial disassembly), this figure of Prime combines with the Change Galaxy versions of his partners, forming Savage Claw Mode and Sonic Wing Mode. Prime himself came packaged with an alternate Super Mode head and his leg armour in order to complete his appearance in each of these forms. Additional Super Mode pieces were not created for this line, as that wasn't the point.

Here is another thing, people complain about the presence of stickers in a LEGO set. I have news for them, stickers keep down the cost of a set. The latest modular building will have stickers with it, but it isn’t the last time a set geared toward adults will have stickers with it. At least LEGO listened to our wishes and got rid of STAMPS (Stickers across multiple pieces). Still that modular will be the only set that will have a red baseplate and printed golden star tiles. Translation, that set will be very hot on the secondary market when it is retired. It is going to be very hard to source out the baseplate if people try to build Palace Cinema by sourcing its parts. (Which is a project some are doing with Cafe Corner and the UCS Falcon)
This is a weird one. Back in the late-’80s, the original TV show had ended and Marvel Comics decided to take the “transform” part of the property a step further and gave a handful of Transformers an organic, human-looking shell. Bumblebee was one of the lucky Autobots to get one. According to the storyline, the Decepticons developed the technology first, but the Autobots secretly caught wind, made their own human shells, and fooled the bad guys into thinking they were fighting mere humans, until they burst out of their shells.
As one of the first Transform Jr toys, this version of Optimus Prime was released under the early name for the series, Transform Gōkin. As a smaller, simplified version of the original Generation 1 Prime figure intended as a low-cost alternative for younger children, Prime features a similar transformation, with a removable head in addition to fists, but lacks rubber tires and translucent windows. As with most other Transform Jr figures, he lacked any of his major accessories, coming only with his rifle and a cardboard replacement for his trailer that had to be assembled by the buyer.

A nice article but I see a few flaws. First of all if the distribution of LEGO sizes/prices is increasingly skewed it is better to either split the sample or look at medians or rolling medians than averages. Secondly, this is a perfect case to run a regression panel regression with time dummies to see both the impact of time and the impact of size on the prices.
Instead of his trailer, Prime can alternately combine with Armada Jetfire, who forms a pair of legs, as "Jet Prime" (Jet Optimus on the cartoon, or "Jet Convoy" if you own the Japanese version). In addition to this, Armada Overload can form a pair of massive cannons that attach to either Prime's base mode, or mount over the shoulders of his super robot torso (with either his trailer or Jetfire as legs), forming Optimus Prime Megaweapon (or Magna Convoy).
On the rocky plains where practically every Transformer battle ever seems to happen, Prime arrived in his Powermaster body to back up three of his troops against Dreadwind and Darkwing. He combined with Hi-Q and transformed, attacking with his trailer's battle station mode. Optimus then combined with the trailer to become a "Super Powermaster" and continue the attack. Who won? Find out in Marvel Comics! Powermasters commercial
"Convoy Last Production" was the final re-use of the Masterpiece toy mold before it was at last retired after numerous re-releases and redecos. The figure is essentially identical to the original Japanese MP-1 release, aside from a slightly brighter red, and the addition of the words "LAST SHOT" in Transformers typeface molded into the small of Convoy's back, hidden beneath its headlight-flaps in robot mode. Lacking the trailer of MP-4, the figure instead comes with a redecoed version of the electronic base included with Hasbro's "DVD Edition" of the figure from five years prior, which now features a collection of sixteen soundbytes of Convoy delivering famous lines from the Japanese version of the Generation 1 cartoon, recited by the character's original Japanese voice actor Tesshō Genda. The base was promoted as containing a hint as to the identity of the next Masterpiece toy; as it would turn out, this was a new version of Convoy himself (see below), foreshadowed by a sound clip on the base which played only intermittently, and which had Convoy announce that he would "soon be reborn".
Optimus appears again in the 2011 film Transformers: Dark of the Moon. Optimus receives his own armory consisting of weapons and flight tech that transforms into a trailer for him to carry in vehicular form. After assisting NEST operatives in fighting Shockwave at Chernobyl, Optimus learns that the humans have concealed the discovery of a Cybertronian ship on the moon. He and Ratchet go to investigate the Ark, where they recover Sentinel Prime, Optimus's predecessor and mentor. Optimus returns him to life using the Matrix of Leadership back on Earth, explaining how they lost the war and Cybertron has become a barren wasteland. Later Optimus shows Sentinel the natural beauty of Earth, and takes the opportunity to offer him the Matrix, but was allowed to keep it. Sentinel later betrayed the Autobots, having formed an alliance with the Decepticons because he wants to restore life to Cybertron. Optimus attempted to reason with Sentinel, but failed as several Decepticons came through a space bridge. After Sentinel Prime insisted that the humans expel the Autobots from Earth, the Wreckers prepare the Autobot ship Xantium for flight. Sam attempts to find out what their counter-attack plan is, but Optimus states they have none, and that Earth's fight is their own. During the departure, the Autobots escape in the first booster stage and return to Earth before Starscream destroys the ship. Arriving in Chicago, Optimus shoots down a Decepticon fighter as he tells Sam and Epps that he never expected the Decepticons to keep their word and that they are going to fight back. Optimus loses his trailer when Shockwave and his Driller arrive. He manages to retrieve it later and uses it as a flight pack, decaptitating the Driller's main head. During the battle, Optimus got caught in exposed wires and the Wreckers helped free him. Flying down onto the main battlefield, he abandoned his flight pack and used the momentum to attack and kill many Decepticons before he finally killed Shockwave. After using Shockwave's cannon to disable the control pillar for the space bridge, Optimus fights Sentinel Prime. Optimus Prime's right arm is cut off and Sentinel is about to end Optimus's life when Megatron intervenes and attacks Sentinel. After defeating Sentinel Prime, Megatron proposes a truce, but, instead, Optimus slices his head off, killing the Decepticon leader. Optimus Prime then grabs Megatron's shotgun and prepares to execute Sentinel, who pleads for his life, saying that he betrayed Optimus just because he wanted to save their race. Optimus executes him anyway, replying that Sentinel betrayed himself. With the Decepticons defeated and the war finally over, Optimus and the Autobots accept Earth as their true home.

Hot Rod only appeared three more times: once when he gave the Matrix to a Quintesson-controlled Optimus Prime. When he lost the Matrix, Rodimus was forced to face down his fears once and for all when the Decepticons began a series of attacks on Japan. Overwhelmed by the different responsibilities and directions he was being pulled in, Rodimus went joyriding and was attacked by the Stunticons Dead End and Wildrider, losing the Matrix in the ensuing crash, which was acquired by the Scourge, one of Galvatron's minions, the Decepticons' tracker and leader of the Sweeps. While Rodimus became Hot Rod again – and was not eager to change back – Scourge was warped and enhanced by the Matrix and led another attack on Japan. Counseled by a martial arts master on giri – the burden hardest to bear – Rodimus realized that the Matrix was his burden, and that he had been chosen to bear it; battling Scourge, he recovered the Matrix and resumed his role as leader, and finally when Optimus Prime was resurrected, Rodimus Prime was able to return to being Hot Rod for good. In all three occasions, his return to Hot Rod took place because he lost or passed the Matrix to someone else.


The new One-Step Optimus Prime toy transforms from a trailer truck into a robot in just one easy step! The toy features a similar transformation to the other One-Step Optimus Prime and One-Step Changer Movie Hound. The figure is only available as a "Special Edition Figure" in a 6-pack with the One-Step figures of Bumblebee, Steeljaw, Grimlock, Sideswipe, and Underbite, all of which are unchanged from their individual releases. This set was exclusive to Target stores in the United States and to Toys"R"Us stores in Canada.
Animated Optimus Prime, in an Earth-based fire truck mode, appears as a hidden character in the Transformers Netjet video game by Hasbro. Instead of being leader of the Autobots, Prime was actually a washout from the Elite Guard. Despite no longer being a member, he maintains his military ranking of "Prime". The scale chart released for the series indicates Optimus Prime stands about 22 feet tall.[13]
The earliest releases of Energon Optimus Prime have no ridges on the inside of the chest windows and a different head sculpt featuring an Optimus Primal-style mouth-slit in Prime's mouthplate. This was soon replaced with a full mouthplate, and it was this version of the toy which appeared in the Energon cartoon and was released by Takara. Other changes made to Takara's version of the toy involved a chromed front grill, more vibrant plastic colors on Digger-3 and Submarine-4, a darker blue plastic on Prime himself, and more intricate paint operations. Takara's release lacks the electronic sound effects seen in Hasbro's version, which were commonly gutted for the Japanese releases of any Autobot toys who had them, though Prime retains his light-up chest.
According to the bio printed in the Transformers Collectors Club magazine, Optimus Prime was a member of the Cybertron Dimensional Patrol, but was abducted by Unicron. It is unknown whether he repainted himself yellow before being abducted or if the recoloration was due to the radiation emanating from Unicron, which has a tendency to recolor Cybertronians.
This highly accurate model kit of Optimus Prime is a Japanese exclusive. It is extremely possible, and comes with his two swords that can be mounted either on his fore-arm, or the hand can be removed and it placed in the wrist via ball joint. His appearance is based on his Dark of the Moon look, as it his "Abbs". The head can be made either with the face-plate on or the face-plate of which reveals a detailed face. Interestingly though, he doesn't come with any of the guns he uses in the films, though it is thought he can hold Buster Prime's gun.
The figure also features a hollow trailer (which also serves as his legs), fit for the Warrior Class-sized toys. The trailer can also be converted into a battle station. Because of the toy's design & transformation, he is kinda show-accurate. Optimus also features 5mm-compatible ports on his trailer, arms, shoulders, legs, knees, waist armor, and the pop-out Decepticon Hunters. He also includes many weapons, including his axe with a short handle. The included weapons can also be combined with the Decepticon Hunters into a dual-bladed weapon. All of his included weapons can be wield by any Warrior Class figures, although the accessories are associated with Bumblebee, Grimlock, Sideswipe, Strongarm, Jazz, & Drift.
A retool of Crash Combiner Optimus Prime available in a two-pack with Grimlock, featuring a new Optimus Prime-ish Combiner head and new arm parts with a green dinosaur-themed front shoulder pads, and he features a lighter shade of red plastic. Like the previous versions, Optimus Prime can become the top half of any Crash Combiner gestalt, though his official combination is with Grimlock as Primelock.
This Japanese e-Hobby exclusive is a redeco of Targetmaster Kup, made to represent the character Orion Pax from the cartoon episode War Dawn. He transforms into a Cybertronic pickup-truck thing. His truck bed has a peg-hole to mount his partner Barrelroller, who also serves as a hand-held weapon. The set also came with a re-deco of Wheelie as Dion.
Optimus dueled Megatron atop of an overpass in a human city. Though he managed to knock Megatron's cannon loose early in the scuffle, Megatron managed to turn the tables on the Autobot leader, reattach his primary weapon, and blast his old foe. When Megatron moved in for the kill, Optimus got his second wind, and knocked Megatron clear off the overpass. They were always real to me.
He comes with a shield with a fold-out handle, allowing Optimus to hold onto it with either hand in robot mode. It has a simple transformation gimmick for vehicle mode which is activated by pressing a button at the top of the shield, causing the sides to spring outwards. In vehicle mode, the shield can be laid flat across the bed of the truck, attaching via a post on the back onto the truck’s trailer hitch. Alternatively, the bumpers on the shield can be rotated outwards, and the front can be bent down in order to form a new front end and hood for "battle vehicle mode", resembling the Stealth Force vehicle modes seen in Dark of the Moon.
Part of the first wave of Mini-Con Battle Pack figures, this Optimus Prime figure is a new mold, about the size of a Scout Class figure (In Optimus' case, the size of Cyberverse Commander figure), and scaled with Legion Class figures. Its transformation scheme also takes some cues from the Legion Class figure. Battle Pack Optimus Prime also features a transparent orange battle axe & armor pieces, although the chest armor/flip-up mask piece is needed to be assembled first. The included pieces can be combined into a clawed battle axe, or attached to his body to form his armor (although the flip-up mask can restrict his head articulation). Optimus Prime can totally wield the axe dual-handed. As an undocumented feature, the axe can be stored on his truck mode with the tab featured on Prime's right shoulder.
This miniature model kit of Energon Optimus Prime comes unassembled and unpainted, moulded mainly from white, red and black plastic and featuring some stickers for essential detail. Standing at around 4.5 inches tall, he comes with his Prime Force drones and can combine with them in the usual ways; while Fire-1, Gyro-2 and Digger-3 are moulded in their normal colours, Submarine-4 is stuck being black, and like every other non-color-molded, non-stickered detail on the kit, must be painted by the buyer. Prime's transformation involves removing his feet and head (an alternate Super Mode head is included, as his antenna does not transform into a helmet), and he does not come with a trailer for the Prime Force, but his gun can shoot small orange plastic BBs via a pressure-launching mechanism, and he comes with a small gold-chromed Energon star that fits onto his left shoulder. The kit also comes with "Episode 1" of the "Optimus Prime VS Scourge" mini-comic, printed on the back of the instructions.
He was only available as an Amazon exclusive in the United States, but was also released at brick and mortar retails in Australia and Hasbro's Asian markets, such as Singapore. Oddly enough, even though the official press release for the figure identifies it as "14 of 30" in Hasbro's Thrilling 30 campaign, the packaging does not sport any such markings.[3] To complicate matters further, a later retrospective by Hasbro on Facebook identifies another product as "14 of 30", which doesn't sport any such markings on its packaging either.[4]

There is one aspect not looked at in the price and that is the shift to model building vs. creation leading to a change in the utility of the pieces. I seem to need many more sets to get a useful variety of pieces these days as many of the sets contain a lot of pieces that are very specific to the needs of the set and are less useful when one wants to create their own designs. It would be a fascinating addition to rate each of the block types on its utility, perhaps by its prevalence in other sets, and then assess each set on its total utility score. So then the question is how many sets would you need to by to achieve different levels of utility and how has this changed over time.


Prime's firing missile and Mini-Con activated gimmicks remain accessible in this mode, but look a bit doofy if you deploy them. The initial Hasbro release of Prime had tabs in its Super Mode shoulders that prevented them from rotating above the horizontal default position, so as not to break the wires that run through the toy's right arm. Coupled with the limited elbow joints, this left Optimus Prime able only to point his weapons towards the ground, and the tabs were removed on subsequent editions of the figure.
Laser Optimus Prime transforms into a mid-1990s Western Star 4964EX, pulling a grey and black fuel tank trailer. The sides of the trailer are decorated with a sticker depicting Prime using a flamethrower to burn down a banner with the words "Optimus Prime Octane" on it. The truck is armed with a disc launcher on the roof of its trailer, which launches five blue discs bearing the Generation 2 Autobot insignia as a knob is turned. Like the other "Laser" toys released this year, Prime features electronics powered by two button-cell batteries; in truck mode, pressing the button on the cab's roof causes his headlight to light up with yellow LEDs.
Rounding out a bumper year of Japanese-exclusive Generation 1 Optimus Primes, the Takara-licensed Kawada brand Diablock Convoy is a fully transformable Lego-style block building figure similar in premise to the earlier American Built to Rule sets. The Diablock figure, however, easily outstrips the Built to Rule sets by both being an accurate representation of the toy on which it is based, and being able to transform between modes without having to be partially disassembled and put back together first.
Generations Selects Ricochet and Red Swoop - Following our last news post regarding this new "Generations Selects" toyline (previously called "Select Series"), we finally have new images of the first two releases, Deluxe Class Red Swoop and Ricochet! These two figures are redecos of Power of the Primes Swoop and Jazz respectively. Red Swoop is based of the original G1 toy's colors (which can be found on the stock renders for the Power of the Primes toy), while Ricochet is meant to evoke the Headmasters character Stepper.
In the alternate universe of the 2003–2004 toyline and series, Transformers: Energon, Rodimus (lacking the "Prime" suffix in English, but still called Rodimus Convoy in Japan) was a great leader on Cybertron ages in the past and was viewed as a hero by many, including similar character Hot Shot. Desiring to escape the war that had consumed the planet, Rodimus departed Cybertron with a contingent of like-minded troops, most of whom settled on an alien planetoid and became the energon-mining Omnicons. Still, Rodimus continued on his journey with Prowl and Landmine, carrying the "flag of peace" from world to world.
Realizing that the planet is dying, Optimus orders a mass evacuation of all Autobot cities, but many transport ships are destroyed by the Decepticon satellite Trypticon, under orders from Megatron that no one shall leave the planet. He orders the Aerialbots Jetfire, Silverbolt and Air Raid to fly and destroy Trypticon. The aerial trio manages to destroy Trypticon's jet pack and send the Decepticon behemoth crashing into Cybertron, where Optimus Prime and the Autobots band together to narrowly defeat him, sending him plunging into a pool of raw energon. Optimus and the remaining Autobots volunteer to stay and defend Cybertron from Megatron for as long as possible while the rest evacuate the planet. He commissions a massive vessel known as "the Ark" to transport the remaining Autobots into space when the time comes.
If Perceptor gave out the right amount of an antidote, the poisoned Autobots were cured. Optimus ordered his troops to ready themselves for the incoming squadron of Decepticons. Perceptor’s antidote did have a side-effect on the Autobots, however; it gave them a fierce battle-fever, making them eager to take on the Decepticons head-on. Prowl suggested to Optimus that they instead opt for a more conniving counterstrike against the Decepticons, and ambush them instead.
Featuring a complex transformation, essentially the front and back ends of the truck fold and converge to become Optimus Prime's legs, as much of the truck rear is connected to the robot thighs via a series of folding panels. The rear wheel cowlings feature a hinge joint in the middle of them so they do not impede his knee articulation. The rear cabin of the cab, directly connected to the smokestacks, rotate and connect to his torso and unfold into his arms. As with most mainline Movie toys, Optimus Prime features Automorph gimmicks, and due to his pricepoint has three of them. Firstly, during initial transformation, rotating his front fenders to become his heels flips the top parts of the grill to become his toes. Secondly, sliding out the double-barrel cannon in his right forearm flips out his spring-loaded Ion Blaster, which lands into place for his right hand. (The Ion Blaster can actually be popped off his forearm fairly easily, held in place by a simple clip.) Optimus' final Automorph, located in his torso, is activated by flipping the silver lever on his stomach activating a series of spring-loaded actions where the truck windows are pushed apart, and the lever between them is raised, enabling the head to spring up from the chest cavity. At this point yellow LEDs light up the chest windows and Optimus Prime's eyes, accompanied by a "powering up" sound effect.

As the Universe War began, Optimus Primal was shown a myriad of Transformers from across all timelines that he could choose to recruit into his Children of Primus in the battle against the Minions of Unicron. One such possibility was a Transformer who was either Thunder Clash or Optimus Prime, but, regardless, Primal chose Depth Charge and Rhinox instead. Homecoming

MP-10 Convoy, advertised as a "perfect new model" on its packaging, is an entirely new tooling of Generation 1 Optimus Prime. Convoy is now smaller, making him more in-scale with other recent Masterpiece toys, such as Rodimus, and comes with a trailer and various accessories. While the front of the vehicle mode's cab is an accurate depiction of a mid-to-late-1980s Freightliner FLT cabover, the back half, (which is, as usual, made out of Convoy's legs) is much larger and robot-leggier in proportion. (So much that they sculpt a ladder on each side.)


Over twenty-plus years, there have been a bajillion releases of this mold, some identical to the original toy, and some featuring significant variants with notably different paint jobs, color schemes, accessories and other pack-ins. We have striven to list all these variants on this page under their respective series; for a quick-reference list of all variants and releases check here. The cab robot has also been used sparingly to represent different characters; outfitted with different trailers, it has become Generation 1 Ultra Magnus and Pepsi Convoy.
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