Fire Blast Optimus Prime is a redeco of the previously released Power Hook Optimus Prime fast action battler. The color scheme is loosely based upon Generation 1 Rodimus Prime, explained rather oddly in the card bio as being the camouflage Optimus took while hunting Decepticons on Mars post-movie... because there are so many long-nose cabs driving around Mars. Yeah.
A larger version of Prime, with Advanced Automorph technology and a more complex transformation procedure. Has two sets of electronic sounds and lights that activate when the head pops up or when you press a button on the roof (in truck mode), and a single projectile weapon that can swing over the toy's right hand. Unlike Megatron (whose head is fixed) and Brawl (whose head is connected with a ball joint), Prime's head is limited to side movement due to the circuitry on his LED eyes. This figure has a folding cannon and a firing missile.[76] With this figure standing nine inches tall and Optimus being 28 feet (336 inches) tall, the toy is about 1/37 scale.
The 1992 and 1993 European and Canadian releases make up what is often called "Generation 1.5", much to the annoyance of many UK fans. These toys are similar in design to the Generation 2 Transformers, having lightpipe eyes, and pastel colors. The 1993 European figures used the G2 faction symbols which Hasbro UK designed because their licence on the G1 symbols had expired. The 1993 figures were repackaged for European G2 release in 1994, and three subgroup molds got used in the US G2 line.
A larger version of Prime, with Advanced Automorph technology and a more complex transformation procedure. Has two sets of electronic sounds and lights that activate when the head pops up or when you press a button on the roof (in truck mode), and a single projectile weapon that can swing over the toy's right hand. Unlike Megatron (whose head is fixed) and Brawl (whose head is connected with a ball joint), Prime's head is limited to side movement due to the circuitry on his LED eyes. This figure has a folding cannon and a firing missile.[76] With this figure standing nine inches tall and Optimus being 28 feet (336 inches) tall, the toy is about 1/37 scale.
While I don’t think anyone should complain about the price of Lego, I have to say that I don’t think our nostalgia for the 80s/90s is at all misplaced -it really was a better time to be a yuppy/young parent. There were more and better jobs available with better pay, benefits, and less required prerequisites. Young adults today have to work a lot harder to maintain the same lifestyle our parents had..of course there are exceptions, if you are especially gifted you can still make it in today’s world.
Softimus Prime is, as his name suggests, a plush G1 Optimus Prime toy. Obviously, he has no problems with articulation and passes the drop test with flying colors. His main draw is the ability to "transform" into his Freightliner FL86 vehicle mode by turning the plush toy inside out, his transformation roughly similar to the Powermaster cab Prime's. He is love, in bed.
A perfect example of why I dislike modern Transformers more and more. I'm 22, and when I was younger Transformers were my favorite thing. I still have many of the ones I had back then. But nowadays I'll go to Target or Toys R Us (RIP) and see what Hasbro has been up to, and they're bragging about how this Transformer only takes 5 steps to transform!
In robot mode, Voyager class Optimus Prime is proportionally more accurate to his CGI design than the leader class toy and has a more accurate headsculpt, but due to the aforementioned lessened complexity significant sacrifices had to be made, such as "cheats" to the transformation sequence, to achieve this and thus he is overall less accurate than he initially appears. In addition to previously mentioned changes, he carries much of the truck's front hood, grill and fenders on his back like a backpack. However, he maintains a superb level of articulation and posability.
The Jetwing jet pack attaches onto Optimus Prime via a part that hooks onto one of the hinges behind his neck, and a spring-loaded clamp that latches onto a recessed area under Optimus' back. The fuel tanks that form Optimus' Ion Blaster must be removed for this mode, and they can be stored inside the engines for the jet pack. The Jetwing can be used on previous Leader Optimus Primes from Revenge of the Fallen onwards, but due to the lack modifications seen in Jetwing Optimus Prime, the combination isn't as stable. The jet pack features four MechTech ports on the main wing articulation points, and two C joint mounting points on each wing. The Gatling Cannons both feature two MechTech ports and 2 C joint mounts on either side of each cannon.

A nice article but I see a few flaws. First of all if the distribution of LEGO sizes/prices is increasingly skewed it is better to either split the sample or look at medians or rolling medians than averages. Secondly, this is a perfect case to run a regression panel regression with time dummies to see both the impact of time and the impact of size on the prices.
Simon Furman's "Alignment", a text story available through Transforce, a British Transformers convention, mentions Prime falling during what was intended to be the final conflict with the Decepticons at Pinea Omicron, long after the events of the Generation 2 comic book. He managed to defeat Galvatron II, but in doing so, was damaged such that Grimlock had to engage a stasis field around him to save his flickering Spark, making Prime a living war monument.
Each of his kabuto helmets forms the head for one of the two combined modes. In addition, either of his kabuto helmets can be connected to his robot mode back (allowing his swords to also be stored on his back), and both can be connected to the rear of his train mode simultaneously. In robot mode or combined mode, his kabuto helmets can be held individually as a shield or combined into an even larger shield.
The cab is yet another iteration of the original Optimus Prime/Convoy toy, based on the Ultra Magnus retool, as distinguished by the elongated hubcap pegs on the front wheels. Indeed, the iPod-aesthetic, all-white deco would make you think this figure should be Magnus, but no, the packaging clearly says "Convoy", making it twice in one year that Takara has released a white-redeco Prime that isn't Magnus.
The second Nightwatch Optimus Prime was released as part of the "AllSpark Power" second half of the Movie line. He is similar to the UK version of Nightwatch Prime, replacing most of his red and blue with different shades of blue and black, retaining his resemblance to Diaclone Powered Convoy in most respects. However, the subdued black and copper on the first Nightwatch Prime have been replaced with gold and a very bright blue, to signify the All Spark energy affecting the Transformers.
Optimus confronted his archenemy on the battlefield, though he had to knock Starscream aside to get to him first. Due to a nearby explosion that rocked the battlefield, Optimus nearly lost both his stance and his head when Megatron took advantage of the opening. But Optimus's quick reflexes allowed him to shift to vehicle mode and back, dodging Megatron's attack and striking back in the process. As the battle raged on, both combatants found themselves evenly matched. Then Ratchet contacted Optimus with dire news; the Decepticons had managed to abduct SARA! Fate
This creation and expansion of the secondary market in conjunction with LEGO now marketing some of their products to an older audience has made the prices of some old sets increase exponentially.  On the extreme range, there is the UCS Millennium Falcon that is selling new for upwards of $2,000 (and close to $1,500 USED!). It sold for $500 new in 2007. Even non-licensed sets can run a premium, such as the Cafe Corner that was one of the original modular buildings. It was $150 new and now it can sell for over $1,000.
Optimus Prime has a wide range of articulation for a relatively bulky figure. He has ratcheting joints in his shoulders, elbows, hips and knees, with swivel joints and ball joints supporting them in his biceps, lower knee joints and ankles. Again, unusually for a mainline figure, especially at the Leader pricepoint, his hands have individually articulated fingers and thumbs, but no wrists.
In the United Kingdom, this Optimus Prime was released as an Argos exclusive along with several other sets branded as part of the Reveal the Shield subline imprint. His United States release was initially claimed to be exclusive to Target by online retailers from Asia, but even though the other Reveal the Shield products eventually became available at Target, Voyager Class Optimus Prime was released as a Toys"R"Us exclusive in the United States instead, complete with a "Toys"R"Us exclusive" sticker. Also, both his United States and Asian releases lack the "Reveal the Shield" logo the United Kingdom release has (but still feature the "Reveal hidden images" call-out).
Optimus & Shreddicus were initially exclusive to San Diego Comic-Con 2017, where they sold out. A small portion of the run had been held for future sales: Hasbro Toy Shop put the set up for sale for about five minutes on August 14 before selling out. The remainder was available at HasCon 2017's exclusives booth, but again they burned through the stock very quickly.

Nonetheless, I remain a big fan of Lego and although I think they have somewhat moved away from their roots with the excess of licensed products (and the earlier licensed products were, in my opinion, not very good because they contained too many specialized non-generic pieces that weren’t useful for generic building. But that situation is improved and in particular we have found the Star Wars sets to be of most value for generic building, because they generally have very few really specialized pieces (although to be fair the sets are most useful for building other spaceships, etc).
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