Alternatively, the Autobots could concoct a plan where Optimus would pretend to allow himself to be taken prisoner, per Buddy’s suggestion. The Decepticons, fooled into thinking they’ve won, took Optimus Prime into their base. Having hidden his troops inside his trailer, Optimus and the Autobots then led a surprise attack on their unsuspecting foes.

With the data from the piece price evaluations I was able to also evaluate the average size of LEGO sets each year. As you can see on the chart below, the average size of sets released each year stayed somewhat constant from 1980-1990 until around 2000 which set sizes started to increase. The average set size seems to have peaked in 2008 (which saw the release of the Taj Mahal), but since then it hasn’t fallen to its pre-2000 levels. It seems to have found a new normal around 300 pieces.


Alternatively, if Optimus chose to use the tainted fuel against the Decepticons, he ordered Grapple to carry out the vat outside of headquarters. He then instructed Grapple to lower the vat into a nearby pit, and instructed Jazz to torch the fuel with his flamethrower. He and Jazz waited until the last possible moment to carry out their plan, and once the fuel was lit, they dived to safety inside the Autobot base with the other Autobots. As the toxic cloud successfully turned away the Decepticons, Optimus was surprised to see Sunstreaker once more fully operational. Having been bought enough time, Perceptor was able to successfully cure the poisoned Autobots. Their ranks fully replenished and the Decepticons turning tail meant the Autobots had earned themselves another victory.
Yet another rerelease of the original toy mold, this gift set of course includes the cab, combat deck trailer, and Roller. Hasbro stock photography of the set depicts Prime with full-length smokestacks, but this would not be the first time that stock photography does not accurately represent the final product. The set also includes a reprint of the first issue of the Marvel Comics series, as well as a DVD containing the entire "More than Meets the Eye" pilot. The set also features a battery-powered Autobot symbol that plays the classic transformation sound, speech recorded by Peter Cullen, and a snippet of the G1 series theme song.
In our list of things you didn’t know about Optimus Prime, we learned that the live action version of Optimus was based on actor Liam Neeson. It turns out Michael Bay likes to base his Transformers on real actors, because it’s been revealed that Bumblebee’s character movements are based on Michael J. Fox-- but not just regular old Michael J. Fox; we’re specifically talking about Marty McFly in the Back to the Future movies.
In an amusing (but glaring) example of poor quality control in a Takara product, the back of the packaging features a small amount of Engrish, notably the word "kinetic" being written as "Kinetick". The bio also mentions the elemental metal as the "Cyber-Matter" living metal, which is used for the Aligned continuity family. Oddly, TakaraTomy's stock photo of the robot mode figure was later used as a cutout "battle figure" included with Telebi Magazine's Burning Megatron.
Generations "Combat Hero Optimus Prime" is a metallic-blue, gunmetal, and red redeco of United Laser Optimus Prime, having the retooled tab, and being based on the canceled Generation 2 Combat Hero Optimus Prime figure, sporting a red mouthplate inspired by the official catalog image for the unreleased toy (packaged samples had featured a traditionally colored gray mouthplate). He comes packed with a (vaguely) Generation 2-styled Deluxe Class Autobot Jazz, as well as unchanged releases of Generations Legends Class Thundercracker and Motorbreath.
Categories: Articles in need of imagesUnreleased toysCharacter stubs missing toysAge of Extinction AutobotsBattle Masters AutobotsBumblebee AutobotsConstruct-Bots AutobotsCostco exclusivesDark of the Moon AutobotsKmart exclusivesMasterpieceMovie AutobotsNESTPlatinum EditionQ-Transformers charactersRevenge of the Fallen AutobotsSam's Club exclusivesStudio SeriesTarget exclusivesThe Last Knight AutobotsTitanium SeriesToys "R" Us exclusivesTransformers (2010) AutobotsTriple ChangersWal-Mart exclusives

[…] What Happened with LEGO When I was working on my last presentation, I totally had the idea of buying a bunch of lego people and taking pictures to make the slides (like those awesome slide decks you see online).  However I was surprised to find that you didn’t just buy a pack of people, but you could buy different bodies, heads, beards, hair, and other accessories – oh, and they weren’t cheap! […]
Unlike previous Convoy toys, the cab section did not separate from the trailer, instead forming the arms of his imposing 12-inch tall robot mode. He lacks any sort of leg articulation in this mode, but his battery powered treads can provide him with locomotion. Star Convoy's chest can open to reveal a control center for Micromaster figures such as his partner figure Hot Rodimus to ride in.

This is a weird one. Back in the late-’80s, the original TV show had ended and Marvel Comics decided to take the “transform” part of the property a step further and gave a handful of Transformers an organic, human-looking shell. Bumblebee was one of the lucky Autobots to get one. According to the storyline, the Decepticons developed the technology first, but the Autobots secretly caught wind, made their own human shells, and fooled the bad guys into thinking they were fighting mere humans, until they burst out of their shells.
Toymaker Fischer Price was the knight in shining armor on this one with the creation of their Power Wheels line. At first, Power Wheels vehicles were very basic with small electric motors and rudimentary Jeep-like styling. Now, Fischer Price has unleashed a car that says "When I grow up, I want to be too rich to care about the environment." This giant bastard comes with tinted windows, a set of dubs and even a fully functional FM transmitter which, no doubt, blasts shitty radio static through its real-live rear subwoofers.
Articles to be expanded from December 2011 Articles with invalid date parameter in template All articles to be expanded Articles lacking in-text citations from December 2009 All articles lacking in-text citations 3H Enterprises characters Action Masters Autobots Convoys (Transformers) Devil's Due characters Transformers automobiles Fictional characters introduced in 1984 Fictional commanders Fictional robots Film characters Fun Publications characters Go-Bots Triple Changers IDW Publishing characters Maximals (Transformers) Powermasters Primes (Transformers) Robot superheroes Spy Changers Transformers Alternators Transformers characters in video games Transformers: Energon characters Transformers: Prime characters Dreamwave Productions characters Optimus Prime

As a result of striving for vehicle realism and painstaking accuracy to his visual portrayal in the live-action films, this Optimus Prime ends up being ridiculously complex. Transforming him back into a truck is probably more complicated than shown in the movie and can only be considered torture. Very unfortunately, the instructions for this toy are infamous for being amazingly vague and unclear in their visual depiction of the transformation steps, making transformation even harder. Also, let us not forget that, upon transforming him back to robot mode, he will declare his identity over and over and over and over and over until you're finished.
According to the bio printed in the Transformers Collectors Club magazine, Optimus Prime was a member of the Cybertron Dimensional Patrol, but was abducted by Unicron. It is unknown whether he repainted himself yellow before being abducted or if the recoloration was due to the radiation emanating from Unicron, which has a tendency to recolor Cybertronians.

The main selling point of the toy is the ability of the truck cab to combine with the trailer to form Super Optimus Prime. The cab portion folded in half and sat in the chest cavity of the trailer's torso, giving him the classic Optimus Prime truck-chest appearance. The two double-barreled cannons were attached to his shoulders and a large, separate head piece was mounted onto the hole on top of the truck cab.

Having launched a painstaking review of each of those 14,200 pieces in the LEGO universe, the Design Lab found that 90 percent of new elements were developed and used just once. And many components were duplicates. Among the dupes were eight minifig police officers and six minifig chefs, with barely decipherable differences between them. The Lab dealt with the redundancies by slashing the total number of components by more than 50 percent. When it reduced the product portfolio’s minifig chef population from six to one, designers protested and longtime fans howled. To calm the fans, LEGO tried humor: it held a mock online memorial service for the “dead chefs.”
The second Nightwatch Optimus Prime was released as part of the "AllSpark Power" second half of the Movie line. He is similar to the UK version of Nightwatch Prime, replacing most of his red and blue with different shades of blue and black, retaining his resemblance to Diaclone Powered Convoy in most respects. However, the subdued black and copper on the first Nightwatch Prime have been replaced with gold and a very bright blue, to signify the All Spark energy affecting the Transformers. The translucent parts were also cast in purple translucent plastic instead of black translucent plastic.
The SS-03 version of Takara's Deluxe-class Optimus figure, based on the Anniversary release, was released in Hasbro markets in a two pack with the smaller Japanese Megatron figure. There are some tiny but notable differences between this and the Anniversary figure; the Hasbro version uses a more neutral dark-gray for the main body as opposed to the Takara version's blue-tinted dark-gray, plain dark-blue plastic rather than dark-blue-with-sparkles, and plain yellow paint for the cab's lights rather than sparkly-yellow/gold.
On a version of Cybertron where Energon shortages have left many of the surviving Autobots and Decepticons all-but immobile, Hot Rod opted to be converted into a smaller and more efficient Micromaster, and thus retained his mobility. Detesting the corrupt system that has fallen into place, Hot Rod seeks to reform Cybertronian society from within the established government, while his former comrade Grimlock joined the resistance in an effort to bring down the old order. Feeling this approach to be no better than Megatron's rebellion that triggered the Great War, Hot Rod opposed Grimlock's efforts, particularly when his plans came to include using the G-Virus to turn a large number of "Builders" into immobile clones of Galvatron, unaware that the effects would also spread to a number of Maximals, Predacons, and Micromasters. Fortunately, Grimlock was betrayed by one of his own men, who destroyed most of the virus, though not before one Cybertronian was infected.
Legends class Optimus Prime is an extremely simplified toy of the extremely complex movie design. As such, he features numerous unavoidable inaccuracies, such as not transforming or even looking very much like the original design or the larger toy versions in robot mode. However, proportionally Legends class Optimus Prime is not far off from the real truck and the Leader class toy's vehicle mode, aside from missing a smokestack on the driver's side. He is articulated at the shoulders and upper legs via ball-joints.
If they took the left passageway, the group happened upon Megatron’s lab. Though Megatron attempted to trick Optimus into activating the Fortress’s self-destruct sequence, Optimus was too clever to be duped. After deactivating both the Destruction beam and the Decepticons themselves, the Autobots found Jessie tied up in a cell. The Autobots then celebrated their victory by guzzling a few quarts of fine-grade oil.

Just which character this toy represents is up for debate. The toy's bio claims he used to turn into a tractor-trailer (indicating Optimus Prime), but considering the timeframe of when they were written and the whole lack of a stance on who Primal "was" before the show and blah blah blah... it's just easier to file this under the same iffiness as the original toy bios set on modern Earth and leave it at that.

Prime's homecoming was not all he had hoped for, for Shockwave had taken control of the planet. Prime and the other transformers were forced to go underground, waging a guerrilla war against the Decepticons. Around this time, Cobra would attempt to steal Teletran-3, but their attempt to teleport directly into the chamber would set off a catastrophic malfunction, one that threatened to crack open time itself. Optimus Prime and the Stunticons were amongst those who found themselves sent back in time. Optimus was reformatted into a 1920s semi-truck and was eventually rescued by Roadblock, Beach Head and the Baroness, who helped him capture the Stunticons.


Nonetheless, I remain a big fan of Lego and although I think they have somewhat moved away from their roots with the excess of licensed products (and the earlier licensed products were, in my opinion, not very good because they contained too many specialized non-generic pieces that weren’t useful for generic building. But that situation is improved and in particular we have found the Star Wars sets to be of most value for generic building, because they generally have very few really specialized pieces (although to be fair the sets are most useful for building other spaceships, etc).
×