Long before the internet came along and ruined life as we knew it, Children amused themselves with the most primitive of toys. At the top of the food chain was the yo-yo. Believed to date back to around 500 B.C. in Greece, and even believed to have been used as a crude weapon in the Philippines, the yo-yo (pronounced yo-yo) made a roaring comeback in the 1920s as a toy, and to a lesser extent as a weapon.
Part of the sixth wave of Custom Kreons, and the first (and only) Robots in Disguise-themed wave, Optimus Prime uses the new 2015 Kreon construction with the hollow waist-peg and "raised" hands.. He comes with a buildable parts rack on which to hang/store his extra pieces. Unlike the previous Custom Kreons, he no longer features a chromed helmet, and comes with an extra clear-plastic helmet, torso, legs, and his arms, plus a chromed Bazooka (originally from the Kre-O Battleship sets), and some kind of a dual pick-axe with a clear red staff.
Prime suffered a severe, though unfair, defeat when Megatron challenged him to one-on-one combat while imbued with the different abilities of all the Decepticons. Teletraan I, the Ark's computer, discovered the deception in time, and the Autobots were able to drive off the Decepticons. In "Prime Problem", Megatron created a clone of Optimus, which caused confusion with the other Autobots. Windcharger and Spike, however, were able to identify the clone before it led the Autobots into their demise.

In the final episode of Transformers: Cybertron, Optimus Prime proposed a new Space Bridge project using the power of the four Cyber Planet Keys and the four great Cybertronian ships. Many Autobots and former Decepticons joined in the project. Jetfire was left in charge of Cybertron as Optimus Prime led the Atlantis with the Earth Cyber Planet Key, joined by Red Alert, Safeguard, Scattorshot, Leobreaker, Menasor, and Heavy Load.
In 1989, the entire line became limited to Pretenders and Micromasters. For the first time, the Transformers received a new design for their title logo. But many also regarded this as a time of a dearth in creativity and the lowest point in the toyline's history. The year 1990 saw the last American burst with the release of more Micromaster characters and the introduction of the Action Masters, non-transforming action figures who came with Transforming companions. Larger Action Master sets came with transforming vehicles and bases. The Action Master line was criticized for its perceived desperation for a gimmick, although it had a few defenders. The line predictably faded and would be the last Transformers output in the US until 1992.
We're sure we're not telling you anything you don't already know when we say that Hot Wheels are miniature die-cast cars with dynamic multi axular momentum technology (ie, they roll). They are usually based on real-life production cars but sometimes are modeled after bad acid trips, with wheels added later (for the rolling). Shortly after the introduction of the cars, Mattel launched various tracks to take full advantage of the cars' rollability.
Brian Colin, Peter Smyth, Mark Buffington, Josh H., Propelstalz, Mary Crocker, Wayne Moulton Jr, Mitch Gross, Jim Valko, Andrew Brown, Lucy Ravitch, Nicholas Duresky, Heather Hofshi, John Kemp, Thorsten Karge, Natasha Dzurny, Keith Ives, Benjamin Chan, Neal Bhatnagar, Justin Farr, Regan Lee, Elaine, Nate Fugal, Stephanie Tennison, Jon Rasmussen, Ryan Pulis, Owen Duffy, Colman Reilly, Anthony, Mark Richman, Alexis Ohanian, Steve, Greg “TVsEgon” Skinner, Andy Saavedra, Daniel, Willie Raymond Taylor III, Chad Ingham, Irene Christian, Clinton Richmond, Jamey Stegmaier, James Allenspach, John Howell, Leif Terry, Tiago Pereira, Nathan Heath, Grinidon, Roman, Berserker Hew, Clark Stacey, Ben Harkins, Kayvaan Ghassemieh, Travis B., Justin Myers, Magna Nordgard, Jim Griffin, Jeff, David Smith, Matthew Titelbaum, Dennis Hitzeman, Daniel Lieske, Michael Jantze, Ruddy, Tom Damico, Kelson, Michelangelo Grigni
The protoform mode consists of eight pieces of metallic blue plastic that plug into the arms, chest, pelvis and legs of the figure. With these pieces attached, the figure can be manipulated in a manner that might charitably be called "transformation" into his meteor-like "entry mode," accomplished by doing little more than tucking the head out of sight and folding the chest back. This blue-and-grey lump can be mounted on a three-piece stand that comes with the figure, allowing you to display it in mid-plummet. Optimus Prime's Earth mode, meanwhile, is made up of many armor pieces (including a particularly large backpack) that form a rather kibbly robot mode, which can then transform into a truck approximating a Peterbilt 379. We would go into what an abominable, unintuitive, parts-massaging mess this transformation is, but we wouldn't want to fill up the rest of the page.
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Yet another Reveal the Shield redeco with the Motorbreath retooling, Convoy is cast in clear red and black plastic. He has been retooled to include a magnet in his right foot, allowing him to interact with Lost Age Battle Command Optimus Prime and Age of Extinction Stomp & Chomp Grimlock. Convoy was available at a variety of 2014 events, including on May 3 at a "Kids Walk" event at Fuji Speedway, in special packaging on May 16 at the "Transformers Celebration 2014" midnight event at the Sunshine City Toys"R"Us store in Ikebukuro, on June 15 at Tokyo Toy Show 2014, at the Aeon Mall in Kasukabe on July 19, and at the "Transformers Expo" event in Yokohama on August 9. Convoy was also available as one of three preorder bonuses for Cloud Roadbuster.
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