The Goldbug change happens in many different continuities, but in the original animated series, it happens like this: while trying to rescue the body of the dead Optimus Prime, which was being held by evil humans, Bumblebee’s damaged by Superion so badly that they have to rebuild him as a more powerful Throttlebot. His new body is much shinier, so a restored Optimus Prime dubs him Goldbug. In the Shattered Glass continuity, he goes evil as Goldbug. And in the IDW comics, confusingly, Goldbug was never affiliated with Bumblebee, but is the leader of the Throttlebots.
In Transformers: Autobots, Optimus Prime meets up with the other Autobots to give further commands to his troops. Create-A-Bot, the new rookie, is eager to help in the cause, but Optimus tells him to sit back while the other Autobots fight the Decepticons. Create-A-Bot finally defies orders and completes a mission against Optimus's council. After nearly getting himself and the other Autobots killed, Create-A-Bot apologizes to Optimus personally. Taking pity on the newcomer, Optimus lets him off with a stern warning, and they move out together to face Megatron, who has absorbed the power of the Allspark. Optimus fights Megatron, but Megatron gains the upper-hand. Optimus is on the verge of defeat when Create-A-Bot takes the Allspark and drives to Megatron's chest, weakening Megatron but mortally wounding himself in the process. Optimus fights Megatron again, defeating him. As Megatron is on the ground, he tells Optimus that if he kills him, the Allspark will be destroyed and Cybertron will never be restored. Optimus says to Megatron that he will do what he must do, then he raises his sword and kills Megatron, destroying the Allspark in the process. Create-A-Bot also dies, but not before telling Optimus his final request to make Earth the new home of the Autobots and to protect the humans. The game ends with Optimus sending a message to all surviving Autobots taking refuge among the stars.

Optimus found himself carrying into battle many miniature robots and machines to the battlefield in the palm of his hand. Among these was a Micromaster city, Micromaster micro bases commercial, the Race Car Patrol, Micromaster Patrols commercial and the Hot Rod Patrol. He and Jazz checked out the Hot Rod Patrol, and Optimus wondered if they could transform. Hot Rod and Construction Patrol commercial
Prime's new trailer is essentially a heavily armed version of the original, with two double-barreled heavy laser cannons mounted on two arms with visible fists. The rear has a fold-down ramp to allow the storage of a smaller transformer, or perhaps spare accessories. The trailer can be transformed into a Powermaster battlestation that can allow other Powermaster engine figures to man the heavy laser cannons.

Great read. I have noticed an absolute drop in quality myself. My sets in my youth range from 83 to 90. My sons are from 2011 and there is a clear distinction. Aside from the weight of identical bricks being different, the older bricks stay together in a much more durable way than the new bricks. To test this, I created the same models using all old bricks and all new bricks and the difference was marked. I understand doing certain things to reduce costs, but not at the expense of quality…


This, of course, is all secondary to the main draw of the figure: it pulls an all-white trailer, which transforms into a working iPod speaker dock by rotating a substantial wedge of its full length 90 degrees . The dock features three working buttons; power, volume up and volume down, as well as an Autobot sigil indicator light. Included is a wall-plugging (Japanese) A/C adaptor with a long lead that plugs into the reverse of the trailer. Although American importers shouldn't have too much trouble, those living in parts of the world using higher strength A/C current outlets should be warned NOT to simply plug the A/C adaptor in with only a socket adapter, as this will overload the device and fry it completely. Buying the appropriate kind of universal A/C adaptor with advice from an electronics specialty shop is recommended.


A Voyager-class two pack of Classics Optimus Prime, representing the Generation 1 version of the character, and a redeco of Age of Extinction Evasion Optimus Prime representing the Movie character (The deco patterns is most likely to emulate the character's design in 2007, with vague results). Like Rusty Optimus Prime (seen below), he features flames on his vehicle mode doors.
Optimus was challenged to a duel by Megatron as a distraction while the Constructicons attempted to strike against Teletraan I. Heavy Metal War - Part 1 Concerned that the Decepticons might try to steal a new Energon related technology from a science facility, Optimus sent Blaster to infiltrate and protect the base. Espionage Optimus was impressed with Grapple and Hoist's plans for a Solar Power Tower, but thought it would be too difficult to defend from the Decepticons. The Master Builders Following the return of the Aerialbots from a trip to Cybertron, they told Optimus and Elita One about how they'd encountered Orion Pax and Ariel. Golden Age Optimus was among the Autobots affected after Megatron sabotaged their recharging chamber. Turned evil, Optimus was sent to attack Rutter Military Base and obtain a solar power satellite. He and the other Autobots were returned to normal by Sparkplug's attitude exchanger, and Optimus promised to repair the base. Attack of the Autobots
Optimus appeared in the 2008 BotCon voice actor play "Bee in the City", voiced by David Kaye. In this story, Professor Sumdac attempts to create a teleportation system to get the Autobots to Cybertron, but an interaction with Sari's key ends up transporting Optimus Prime, Bumblebee, and Sari to Transtech Cybertron. There, they met Flareup and are detained by Shockwave. Bumblebee teams up with Beast Wars Megatron to free his comrades, but must then stop Megatron from taking the key for himself. Afterward, the Autobots and Sari returned to their own dimension.
Surely one of the strangest examples of licensed Transformers products, Sports Label Convoy transforms into a shoe. Something of a shellformer, this baffling incarnation of Prime is colored primarily white and red in his alt mode of a realistic-looking (if notably undersized) Nike Free 7.0 sneaker, complete with gratuitously long real fabric shoelaces. In robot mode, he is made instantly recognizable by his incorporation of some additional blue and silver in predictable areas, and a traditionally Prime-styled head. Less traditionally, and somewhat perversely, Prime's feet are sculpted in the likeness of his own sneaker mode, making it seem like he's wearing himself!
[…] What Happened with LEGO When I was working on my last presentation, I totally had the idea of buying a bunch of lego people and taking pictures to make the slides (like those awesome slide decks you see online).  However I was surprised to find that you didn’t just buy a pack of people, but you could buy different bodies, heads, beards, hair, and other accessories – oh, and they weren’t cheap! […]

Long before the internet came along and ruined life as we knew it, Children amused themselves with the most primitive of toys. At the top of the food chain was the yo-yo. Believed to date back to around 500 B.C. in Greece, and even believed to have been used as a crude weapon in the Philippines, the yo-yo (pronounced yo-yo) made a roaring comeback in the 1920s as a toy, and to a lesser extent as a weapon.


The single carded release of Optimus Prime is a redeco of Revenge of the Fallen Legends Class Optimus Prime, exclusive to Walmart in the US and Asda in the UK. Deco changes included in this toy are the top half of the knee armor's blue being omitted and an Autobot insignia tampographed on the left knee, and similar to the Legends Class Power Armor Optimus Prime: the red arms, and the abdomen was replaced into blue.

A golden-chrome redeco of Cybertron Metroplex was offered as a contest prize in the December 2005 issue of TV Magazine, and came with an equally blinged-out Legends/EZ Collection Optimus Prime figure. Fifteen of this set were available as prizes in the initial contest; a single Metroplex was later offered as one of many prizes in a Takara website contest, but this version came only with the standard metallic paint version of Prime.
A black and red version of the First Edition deluxe Optimus Prime could be seen in the San Diego Comic-Con 2011 Transformers slide show, inside a mock-up of the wearable Matrix of Leadership package done for the convention that year. This figure was presumably a test-shot, as it seems to share plastic colors with Generations Sky Shadow (who was, coincidentally, first revealed at that same Comic-Con).

If Cosmos radioed his findings to Optimus immediately, Optimus’s convoy moved in to investigate a nearby Decepticon base. En route, the Autobots passed near a human town, but began floating in mid-air before being able to reach it. Optimus quickly deduced that this phenomenon was caused by an anti-gravity beam, courtesy of the Decepticons. Worried about the nearby humans also being affected by the lapse in gravity, Optimus had to decide whether he would order his troops to stop and help the townspeople, or to continue forward and attack the Decepticon base.


The single carded release of Optimus Prime is a redeco of Revenge of the Fallen Legends Class Optimus Prime, exclusive to Walmart in the US and Asda in the UK. Deco changes included in this toy are the top half of the knee armor's blue being omitted and an Autobot insignia tampographed on the left knee, and similar to the Legends Class Power Armor Optimus Prime: the red arms, and the abdomen was replaced into blue.

Really great, well-researched article. I think you hit the nail on the head here – the fact that there are more expensive sets than ever before affects perception. Also, I’m pretty sure the presence of a baseplate (light but large) in the old sets made them seem bigger. I don’t like the lack of baseplates in new sets – it does make them seem smaller.
What I find more interesting is who’s in this wave. Not only is there Hot Rod and Barricade in ’80s muscle car form, but Optimus Prime in his red G1 Peterbilt truck form (just with movie Optimus’ head! Maybe Bumblebee will explain the origin of his “rip off everyone’s face” fetish). Two versions of Bumblebee round out the wave, his traditional movie-verse Camaro and G1 VW Bug.
Standing only two-and-a-quarter inches tall, Smallest Transforming Transformers Optimus Prime was the smallest fully transforming G1 Optimus toy for a while, at least until the release of his chubby super-deformed Q-Transformers versions. He features an accurate transformation sequence based on the original full-sized toy, replacing the detachable hands with actual sculpted fists, and even including a tiny version of his laser rifle. Unsurprisingly, he also has little articulation and is only capable of moving his arms and legs.
These include two large guns, patterned after the new weapons included with the G2 version of the classic Optimus Prime toy, which can be attached to the trailer in a similar fashion to those of Powermaster Prime. Also included are two additional (blue) Prime heads, sculpted explicitly in the style of Generation 2 comic artist Derek Yaniger's interpretation of Prime, especially as seen on the cover of the first issue, one pristine and the other battle-damaged.
Certainly the most iconic, and most common, leader of the Autobots is Optimus Prime. But the thing about Optimus Prime is that he dies... a lot. And every time he dies, someone has to take his place-- until he’s invariably resurrected in one way or another, that is. In many storylines, including the original animated Transformers: The Movie, it’s Hot Rod who takes over as Rodimus Prime.
As with other earlier Cyber Series figures, Optimus Prime had a rather strange release cycle. At first, he only retailed exclusively in Asia and Latin America, with the closest to a U.S. release being in limited quantities from online retailer BigBadToyStore.com. He did, however, end up being available in the Universal Studios Theme Park, and also later as a Walgreens exclusive.
The first commercialized yo-yos in America were sold in vast majority by entrepreneur Donald Duncan and children couldn't get enough of them. The design was elementary: two wooden or plastic discs, connected by an axle with a string tied to it. To keep the user from flinging the yo-yo comically through the nearest window pane, the string featured a tiny finger loop at the opposite end. A loop that, as we all remember, tightens relentlessly with each toss until the finger tip is a healthy shade of purple.
He resembles previous Optimus characters in robot mode: his angular chest windows are reminiscent of Cybertron Optimus Prime, while his near-animalistic limbs and color scheme are evocative of Beast Wars Optimus Primal. He has excellent articulation due to his many ball joints, and is armed with a rifle. The flame attachment can fit onto the end of the (non-firing) gun barrel.
Offered as part of a Lucky Draw campaign in August 2004, this extremely rare version of Masterpiece Convoy is almost entirely vacuum-metalized gold, lacking any other painted detail or stickers. The parts which are not viable are molded in a flat golden plastic; the only exceptions are its rubber tires, the core of the Matrix and the energon-axe, which remain black, blue and orange, respectively. Whether or not the figure was intended to evoke Optimus Prime's entirely-golden appearance in the cartoon episode "The Golden Lagoon", when he was coated with electrum, is unknown; given that entirely chroming a figure gold is a fairly standard deco for Lucky Draw figures, it may just be happy coincidence more than anything else.
Optimus Prime is the fictional protagonist of the Transformers: Robots in Disguise (Fire Convoy in the original Japanese version) branch of the Transformers universe.[38] Based on the character of the same name, Prime once again leads the Autobots against the Decepticons. His voice actor, Neil Kaplan, does his voice in a style reminiscent of that of Peter Cullen, the voice of the original Optimus Prime. Wired Magazine nominated Fire Convoy as one 12 most ridiculous Transformers ideas of all time.[39]
×