The first Generation 2 Optimus Prime toy was largely identical in sculpt to the original Generation 1 figure release. While his cab robot retained his original red and blue color scheme, his trailer was recast in black, with the original blue and silver striped sticker replaced with a red and silver one displaying Optimus's name. On the first release of the trailer, the internal components and Roller matched the blue of the cab robot. Later, the internal components were changed to a lighter blue, as was Roller. Another running change followed, making the dark blue of the cab robot match this lighter shade. A bright yellow "Autobot" tampograph was also added to the back of his right leg.
Megatron came upon Optimus and challenged his old foe to a duel. Optimus managed to gain the upper hand, but hesitated to deliver the killing blow when he discovered that Megatron had married the Matrix to his spark, corrupting it. Several Decepticons then swarmed Optimus, allowing Megatron to blast a hole through his chest. Dead and defeated, Optimus plummeted down into the bowels of Cybertron. Pax Megatronus Rodimus and Duke travelled far beneath Cybertron, where they discovered Ultra Magnus- the Autobot god of death -carrying Optimus's body away. Earth: R.I.P.
This Optimus Prime is a redeco of the figure above, featuring red wheels and various Tech Spec-sque patterns on the legs & chest which can be decoded with their transparent red weapons, which is molded in a sprue similar to the ones used for the Arms Microns kits & Robots in Disguise (2015) Mini-Con figures. He can use any weapons included in this set, although his primary weapon is an axe.

He was only available as an Amazon exclusive in the United States, but was also released at brick and mortar retails in Australia and Hasbro's Asian markets, such as Singapore. Oddly enough, even though the official press release for the figure identifies it as "14 of 30" in Hasbro's Thrilling 30 campaign, the packaging does not sport any such markings.[3] To complicate matters further, a later retrospective by Hasbro on Facebook identifies another product as "14 of 30", which doesn't sport any such markings on its packaging either.[4]
Animated Optimus Prime, in an Earth-based fire truck mode, appears as a hidden character in the Transformers Netjet video game by Hasbro. Instead of being leader of the Autobots, Prime was actually a washout from the Elite Guard. Despite no longer being a member, he maintains his military ranking of "Prime". The scale chart released for the series indicates Optimus Prime stands about 22 feet tall.[13]
Optimus later led a convoy in search for a building site for Autobot City, which ran into a Decepticon ambush. Rodimus Prime remembers the Transformers greatest battle on Earth. He sent off several Autobots to get help, knowing this was the only chance of victory. Transformers Combat Data Those several Autobots were seen again, but Prime... wasn't.
The figure's transformation scheme is based on the original G1 figure, the only differences being that the fists are not removed but become the headlights, and instead of flipping backwards inside the chest, Diablock Convoy's noggin flips forwards with the aid of opening chest windows. A "laser rifle" in the shape of his ion cannon can be built from black bricks, and stickers bearing the Autobot faction symbol can be placed on his shoulders, although this is not recommended as it is designed to permanently stick to multiple tiles which dislodge easily and may damage the sticker.
Optimus has the ability to change any part of his robotic body into a tool or gadget. He has swing lines in his wrists. His wrists can also fire capture bolas. His arsenal includes a grappler, fire extinguisher and a negative friction spray. It is interesting that, unlike all the previous series, his face can almost always be seen, because his mouthplate is retractable like in the 2007 live action film.
Laser Optimus Prime transforms into a mid-1990s Western Star 4964EX, pulling a grey and black fuel tank trailer. The sides of the trailer are decorated with a sticker depicting Prime using a flamethrower to burn down a banner with the words "Optimus Prime Octane" on it. The truck is armed with a disc launcher on the roof of its trailer, which launches five blue discs bearing the Generation 2 Autobot insignia as a knob is turned. Like the other "Laser" toys released this year, Prime features electronics powered by two button-cell batteries; in truck mode, pressing the button on the cab's roof causes his headlight to light up with yellow LEDs.

A redeco of of the Cyber Commander toy above, this Prime features grey plastic replacing the original blue, some deco differences on the arms, body & legs. He also features a flame tampograph on the sides of his vehicle front. He comes in an altered packaging that replaces the first version's painted prototype stock photos with CG renders depicting the new deco, and also features a new Hasbro product code number, thus making him officially a separate product rather than a drastic running change variant.


Meanwhile, the U.K. offices of Marvel Comics were producing their own storylines. Writer Simon Furman offered a different take on Prime, that he was weary of the war he had been forced to fight. In the "Prey" storyline, Prime arranged for Wheeljack to build a copy of himself and destroy it to see how the Autobots could cope without him. Unfortunately, the plan was derailed by Megatron and the Predacons. During the battle, Prime, Megatron, and Ultra Magnus were transported to Earth. There, Prime accidentally interrupted his own funeral service. The theme of war-weariness would again come to the fore in the U.K. strips detailing Prime's U.S. death.

This line features robot versions of various Star Wars characters. Confirmed figures are Darth Vader, Luke Skywalker, Boba Fett, Commander Cody and Jango Fett. Darth Vader turns into his custom Tie Fighter while Luke Skywalker turns into an X-wing. Jango Fett and Boba Fett become Slave I, and Commander Cody turns into a Turbo Tank. There is combiner of Millennium Falcon of two characters, Han Solo and Chewbacca and Primus/Unicron-like Death Star that transforms into a giant Darth Vader. There are more Star Wars characters into Transformers like General Grievous and Obi-Wan Kenobi. This line was later revived and merged into the Transformers: Crossovers toy line, many more Transformers included characters from Star Wars: The Clone Wars like Ahsoka Tano who transforms into her Jedi starfighter, and Captain Rex who transforms into an AT-TE.[3]


He includes the Sword of Judgment and Sentinel Shield accessories, which he can respectively wield and mount on his left forearm, all via 6mm post. In truck mode, the sword is stored underneath, while the shield mounts onto the trailer hitch. The sword also features a 5mm post on its hilt. Interestingly, the truck mode is able to pull G1 Optimus Prime's trailer.
Exclusive to LDH Shop, this redeco of the Music Label Convoy toy is utterly ridiculous and was created as a promotion for the Japanese pop band EXILE. While Convoy himself has EXILE written on his right forearm, his trailer sports the "Love Dream Happiness" tagline of LDH Inc.[1], as well as the "EXILE Perfect Year 2008" logo of the "EXILE Perfect Year 2008 Ultimate Best Box" boxset, which was released some months after he was.

Optimus Prime has appeared in numerous video games since the introduction of the Transformers series. He makes a cameo in the 1999 Beast Wars Transmetals video game for Nintendo 64, where he is killed by Megatron at the end of the campaign, showing what would have happened in the Beast Wars series with a Predacon victory. Prime is also one of the playable characters in the 2003 Japan-only Transformers game for the PlayStation 2 and the 2010 Transformers: War for Cybertron. Optimus Prime is also playable in the Hasbro Net Jet Transformers fighting game Transformers Battle Universe. Three versions of Optimus Prime are playable characters, including the first generation incarnation, his incarnations from the 2007 live-action film, and the incarnation from Transformers Animated. In this game, Optimus Primal is also a playable character. He is a regular character in the Nintendo GameCube and PlayStation 2 2003 fighting game DreamMix TV World Fighters. He appeared as a boss in a simple Flash-based video game on the Hasbro web site.[25]
A Japanese exclusive, this is a new line of Transformers toys shaped from Disney characters that were first introduced in 2009. Originally revealed in the November 2008 issue of Figure Oh! Magazine in Japan, it was a collaboration project between Takara Tomy and the Walt Disney Company. The first line of the toy series is the Mickey Mouse Transformer which was modeled after Optimus Prime with the same colors as its Transformer counterpart and can transform into a cartoonish trailer truck like the original version. The toy was released on February 26, 2009 following with the Black and White Version a month later on March 26, 2009. A figure of Donald Duck based on both Bumblebee and Herbie the Love Bug, and a second repaint of the Mickey Mouse trailer in Halloween colors, are also planned for release.
Four million years ago, Cybertron, shaken from its orbit and drifting through space, became threatened when it floated into the path of an asteroid field. Prime led a group of elite Autobot warriors on the Ark, the Autobot starship, on a mission to destroy the asteroids. Although the mission was successful, during the aftermath of this mission, the Ark was attacked by Decepticons hoping to overpower their weakened foes. Intent on keeping the secrets of the Ark from the Decepticons, Prime set the craft on a suicide course, crashing it into the then prehistoric planet Earth.
Produced as an action figure by the Japanese company Kaiyodo, the main selling point of the line is the 'Revolver' joint. This gives the figure a high degree of articulation, allowing for many dynamic and varied poses. Hot Rodimus is number 047 in the Yamaguchi series, and comes with extra sets of hands, a pair of pistols, an extra head (which is molded with his binocular vision, as seen in The Transformers: The Movie) and a display stand.
Hasbro's subsidiary Milton Bradley (MB) released the toy in Europe in late 1985, following a slight delay due to licensing issues;[13] there are no less than three variants of MB-packaged Optimus Prime, one of them manufactured by Takara and sporting blue feet, the other two manufactured by Joustra as part of a deal with Hasbro/MB, one of them with blue and the other one with red feet;[14]
Optimus suffers from a design flaw that many other Voyager Class figures in the Combiner Wars line experience: the detents, or "click points", on the heavily-ratcheted outward motion of his hips (which also form the hips of his torso mode) are few in number and very far apart. As a result, Prime's legs have great difficulty assuming the natural "A-stance" formation that the angled design of his foot sculpt seems to have been meant to accommodate. Likewise, when forming the torso of Ultra Prime, the interactions of the knee-lock mechanism and the hip detents almost always force Ultra Prime's legs into either an awkwardly knock-kneed arrangement or an equally awkward, and often unstable, bow-legged posture (as seen in the image to the right) that prevents Ultra Prime from standing flat-footed. Unlike Motormaster, this version of Optimus was the only one to not receive the improved hip ratchets implemented in its future releases in some shape or form by Hasbro, though they would be used for the Battle Core redeco later in the line. However, there are third party ratchet replacements for the hips.
Optimus Prime is the fictional protagonist of the Transformers: Robots in Disguise (Fire Convoy in the original Japanese version) branch of the Transformers universe.[8] Based on the character of the same name, Prime once again leads the Autobots against the Decepticons. His voice actor, Neil Kaplan, does his voice in a style reminiscent of that of Peter Cullen, the voice of the original Optimus Prime. Wired Magazine nominated Fire Convoy as one 12 most ridiculous Transformers ideas of all time.[9]
The toy's primary gimmick is its auto-transforming trailer, which assumes one of three configurations when triggered by an infra-red signal transmitted from the cab robot. Transforming the cab into robot mode will cause the trailer to automatically flip open into a battle station for Mini-Cons, which Prime can stand in the centre of. The base features a central tower with a pop-out artillery emplacement and a mount for Prime's large cannon; a rotating missile-firing turret; two Mini-Con storage bays, one of which featured a manually-activated tab to launch Mini-Cons out; and two live Mini-Con hardpoints, one of which pops up a non-firing turret, the other activating a laser noise.
Prime's trailer unfolds via a spring-loaded transformation mechanism in a battle station that is positively bristling with varied weaponry. In addition to the disc launcher, it is armed with a "ripple-fire" missile launcher that fires five missiles, an air-powered rocket launcher like the one previously seen on Hero Optimus Prime, and a small laser cannon that mounts on the base's main tower. Both the missile launcher and laser cannon can disconnect and be held by Prime; his LED-fist will illuminate the laser cannon like it does his sword. Additional missiles and a second rocket are stored in grooves inside the sides of the trailer.
Normally Big Lots is a good place to look for older toys and potato chips from brands you've never heard of, but look at this, something new! Thanks to a sighting by our very own xRotorstormx of the Twincast Podcast crew we have news of the BotBots 5-packs showing up at Big Lots. Priced at $10 and appearing before most major retailers the 5-packs feature four visible figures and one secret figure under the red bubble, similar to the single figures that started showing up during the - Read More
What makes LEGO sets seem more expensive now is that the effective piece count seems lower. I remember that in the 80s, each set was full of bricks that were not overtly specialized only to that set. So they were useful for more things. Now the sets usually come with less bricks and plates (things that could be useful everywhere) and bring more things like minifigure accessories, flick fire missiles and other things that are not that useful. Although I think that everything was far worse in the late 1990s/Early 2000s than it is now.

Hot on the heels of their licensing deals with Pepsi and Nike, TakaraTomy got themselves a slice of Apple™ pie and released Convoy —playing iPod speaker— as part of their small, musically-themed Music Label line. This version of Prime is an all-white redeco of the original Generation 1 cab robot, which (much like the "Marine Version" of Prime from the Sports Label line) makes it seem like he ought to be Ultra Magnus. The figure is actually even derived from the retool of the mold created for the original Ultra Magnus figure, as distinguished by the elongated hubcap pegs on the front wheels. Like Pepsi Prime before it, the figure's fists now store in peg holes on the under side of its trailer. The toy lacks any of the original Prime's stickers (even the silver stripe on his chest is now a paint operation) and includes the original thick-barrelled version of Prime's blaster. The toy features a brand new headsculpt based on the 20th Anniversary Prime figure, given additional poseability not previously seen on the figure by being mounted on a ball joint.
Megatron is captured by the Autobot Targetmasters in the episode "Do Over". When Optimus learns Megatron has been captured, he rushes to be the one who kills his old enemy, despite the closing launch window of the Ark. When confronted by Optimus Prime, Megatron attempts to use the Autobot Targetmaster Nightstick to shoot the Autobot leader, but Nightstick takes control of Megatron's arm. Megatron then tricks Optimus into using Megatron's own sword to cut his hand off, freeing him from Nightstick. Optimus fails to kill his foe and misses the launching of the Ark, which has been taken over by Rodimus. He then takes out his anger on Blurr.

The sequel series, Transformers: Generation 2, began an undisclosed period of time later. At the beginning of the series, Prime was restored to a form resembling his original body. He and the Transformers found themselves caught in the schemes of a new generation of Cybertronians, led by the icy Jhiaxus, who were colonizing and cyber-forming other worlds. Plagued by nightmarish visions of a life-destroying entity called "the Swarm", Prime looked into Cybertron's past and discovered that Jhiaxus and his kind were the result of an unintentional Transformer reproduction. Their nature and intent, he found, was distilled to the purest, most unemotional form of conquest and that the Swarm was the by-product of this process. To fight this new enemy, Prime and the Autobots entered into an alliance with the recreated Megatron's Decepticons. Though Prime was eventually consumed by the abomination and destroyed, he was able to unleash the energies of the Matrix into the Swarm, purifying it. In parting, the Swarm recreated Prime in a new form, and he and Megatron set out to lead the united Autobots and Decepticons into a new age.


Optimus Prime is then informed that Megatron has infected the core of Cybertron with dark energon and is given the task to undo the damage done. After rescuing Omega Supreme, Optimus, Ironhide, and Prowl fight their way to the core, but it's too late. The core informs Optimus that it is far too corrupted. It can repair itself by shuting down, but it will take millions of years. By that time, Cybertron will have to become cold, barren, and uninhabitable. The core gives Optimus a small piece of itself, saying it will still survive as long as the piece does. Optimus accepts the burden and the core relinquishes the Autobot Matrix of Leadership.

The Optimus Prime Kreon in this set is based on the character's rusty, crusty "evasion mode" from the Age of Extinction movie. He has a ferrous-metal backpack, which is used to interact with the magnetic parts in the various sets. In this specific set's case, it's so he can be grabbed by the buildable Strafe's dino-claws, once Strafe uses said claws to open up the "laser" cage made to contain Optimus. (Yeah, we know Strafe appears way after Optimus ditched this look in the movie.)
But up first, as we said, is The Last Knight. The teaser trailer was released earlier this month and boy did it tease a doozy: it depicted Optimus Prime and Bumblebee fighting. Yes, the two old pals, mentor and protégé of sorts, were locked in fisticuffs, the Autobot leader giving Bee a sound pounding. There are a number of theories as to what’s going on there, but what we do know is that it promises an intriguing storyline for our favorite yellow robot, and it may well lead directly into the plot of his solo flick.
Optimus Prime has fictionally shown a dislike of certain kinds of music and dance. For the Marvel Comics continuity, the letters page for issue 324 mentions he hates the music of Mötley Crüe. In the cartoon continuity, "Blaster Blues" and "Quest for Survival" have Optimus react noticeably more passive-aggressively to Blaster's choice of music than the other Autobots. And in the Dreamwave Generation One continuity, Hardwired features an uncalled for negative remark about Jazz's dance skills.

This occurs in a Japanese toy line, animated series, and mobile video game called Q-Transformers. Specifically, the video game is called Q-Transformers: Mystery of Convoy Returns. Both Bumblebee and Optimus Prime are able to switch between their Generation 1 and movie modes in the series and game-- specifically Q-Transformers: Mystery of Convoy Returns. Strangely, though, when he’s in Generation 1 mode, he’s not a Volkswagen but another small, quirky car: a Daihatsu Copen. The show is pretty meta, with the characters being aware that they’re toys and they even talk about the Mystery of Convoy video game that they’re in.
Optimus Prime is also among the characters who appear in the flash game TRANSFORMERS CVBERVERSE Battle Builder Game.[21] Optimus Prime is one of the Autobots featured in Transformers: The Ride at Universal Studios theme parks. In the ride, Optimus fends off against the invading Decepticons at N.E.S.T. headquarters while telling Evac to escape with the AllSpark shard. He battles Megatron throughout the ride until Megatron is killed by Evac. Optimus then congratulates Evac and the riders for protecting the AllSpark.
In one Universe, Optimus led his Autobots against Megatron's Decepticons until the Cybertronian civil war led to the creation of the monstrous combiner Thunder Mayhem. Thunder Mayhem turned on his masters, ultimately leading to him rampaging across Cybertron. History The Decepticon Toxitron was made to resemble Optimus Prime as a blow to Autobot morale and also sported a cybermetric signature that matched Prime's. The Toxic Transformer
In the Japanese exclusive Transformers: The Headmasters storyline (which replaced the "Rebirth" finale in Japanese continuity), Hot Rod appeared as part of Optimus Prime's inner circle. When Galvatron and his Headmaster warriors launched a devastating attack on Cybertron, Vector Sigma was damaged, and Hot Rod was sent to Earth to retrieve the Matrix. Recovering it, he returned it to Prime, only to be surprised when the ghost of Alpha Trion once again reformatted him into Rodimus Prime to help Optimus. After Prime's second death, Rodimus once again took command of the Autobots. However, when Scorponok destroyed Vector Sigma, Rodimus decided to leave the war, and left Fortress Maximus in command of the Autobots.
This redeco of the Dark of the Moon Voyager Class Optimus Prime figure features a really unusual deco pattern consisting of red transparent tires, the vehicle front grill and fuel tanks (the fenders remained opaque red due to unpaintable plastic). Some of his parts like the vehicle front hood and the truck roof features a pattern similar to the ones used for the Tech Specs in the Generation 1 toys. He features a new sword and shield accessory, which can be used to decode the patterns.
With the acclaimed Studio Series line marching onward triumphantly into 2019, we have just received a new review of the line’s latest offering, Battle-Damaged Megatron, which most of us know emulates Megatron’s appearance following the climactic final showdown between him, Optimus Prime and the Fallen in the second film. The review comes courtesy of YouTuber PrimeVs.Prime, who has thus far extensively catalogued the line beyond today’s subject. He goes into detail regarding the detailing - Read More
As had first been done in the Armada line, Takara elected to supplement their release of the Super class Optimus Prime figure with a new-mold Deluxe class toy. Coming without trailer, Prime Force or electronics, this Prime discarded the larger toy's ability to form Super Mode in favor of being able to Powerlinx with the other compatible toys of the Energon line, forming either a torso or a pair of legs that the other Autobots could connect to. Like the Deluxe Armada Prime, this one too was on the small side for its size class, but just as that figure could, this small Prime can still tow the Super class figure's trailer.
Optimus Prime was one of only two Armada-theme figures in the otherwise Generation 1-centric Q-Robo Collection line of super deformed PVC figurines, the other being Armada Megatron. Like all the figures in the series, Prime featured articulation in the neck and shoulders, and was also available in a translucent colored plastic: as an Autobot, Optimus came in translucent red, but was also uniquely available in a golden metallic "pewter" variant as the wave's solitary rare chase figure. All Q-Robo figures were sold in sets of two, one full-color figure and one translucent one, blindpacked in a plastic capsule.

During the promotion of the Transformers films, Optimus Prime appeared in several commercials. Optimus Prime, along with other Transformers, were featured in several commercials for General Motors. Scenes with Optimus Prime were used in several General Motors commercials.[48] A commercial for the Discovery Channel featured Optimus Prime singing part of a promotional song.[49]

Nonetheless, I remain a big fan of Lego and although I think they have somewhat moved away from their roots with the excess of licensed products (and the earlier licensed products were, in my opinion, not very good because they contained too many specialized non-generic pieces that weren’t useful for generic building. But that situation is improved and in particular we have found the Star Wars sets to be of most value for generic building, because they generally have very few really specialized pieces (although to be fair the sets are most useful for building other spaceships, etc).
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