French die-cast model producers Majorette teamed with Kabaya to produce the Transformers Mini Car Collection, a line of Armada-themed die-cast vehicles, all of which were redecos of pre-existing Majorette toys. Prime was a redeco of Majorette toy #256—a long-nosed tow truck—in his traditional red and blue, now bearing the Autobot insignia, the Micron Legend logo, and an image of the Autobot leader on its hood. The toy came with a pack of gum.
All of the Tiny Titans were sold blindpacked. However: there's a tiny clear window in the back to peek at the item inside, making the task of getting the ones you want easier. Every collectible card included in Tiny Titans has a scannable insignia sticker on it. Scanning the badge unlocks a random amount of Energon "currency" and a randomized bonus power-up item, and can only be scanned once per day. It's honestly quicker and less redundant to say which toys don't have this feature.
The series begins when Optimus and his crew, after picking up a disillusioned ninja named Prowl, are sent to clear rubble from a space bridge passage. There, the Autobots stumbled upon the Allspark and are immediately attacked by Megatron's battle cruiser, the Nemesis. Through treachery by Megatron's second-in-command, Starscream, Megatron was fragged and the Autobots crashed on Earth in the early 21st century. After being in stasis under Lake Erie for 50 years, the Autobots awaken in Detroit of the near future, where they immediately discovered humans in need and became heroes of the city after stopping a Sumdac Industries experiment gone wrong. During the battle for the possession of the Allspark, Optimus goes offline after defeating Starscream, only to be revived by Sari Sumdac and her Allspark-infused key.
This mold was redecoed into Universe Optimus Primal and Beast Wars Telemocha Series DX Convoy, and retooled into Beast Wars Reborn/Beast Wars Tenth Anniversary versus pack Optimus Primal. Takara also created multiple special variants, including all-gold (from Tele-V Magazine, only ten awarded), red and gray (Tele-V again, but only one awarded), and blue-fur (a Comics Bom Bom design-contest prize, only five awarded).

Optimus Prime comes with many accessories in addition to the aforementioned Matrix, including the character's traditional laser rifle, now termed (and henceforth known as) an ion blaster. The initial release of the figure cast the ion blaster in grey plastic, but later assortments recast it in its more familiar black coloration. Other accessories include a transparent orange energon-axe that plugs into either wrist when Prime's fist is retracted, and even a non-transforming gun mode Megatron weapon, with removable stock, silencer and scope accessories, in homage to several instances in the Generation 1 cartoon when Prime was forced to wield his enemy. Pack-in bonuses that came with the figure included an inner cardboard tray illustrated to resemble the interior of Prime's Combat Deck, and in later releases, a small poster drawn by Pat Lee.


Optimus Prime is primarily voiced by Peter Cullen in most of his incarnations, who voiced him in the original series. Following the production of the 2007 film, Cullen reprised his role for the sequels and supporting media and would even voice Optimus in later series such as Transformers: Prime. Optimus has been voiced by a number of other voice actors in other series such as Neil Kaplan, Garry Chalk, and David Kaye in the series Transformers: Robots in Disguise, Unicron Trilogy, and Transformers Animated, respectively.
If Cosmos radioed his findings to Optimus immediately, Optimus’s convoy moved in to investigate a nearby Decepticon base. En route, the Autobots passed near a human town, but began floating in mid-air before being able to reach it. Optimus quickly deduced that this phenomenon was caused by an anti-gravity beam, courtesy of the Decepticons. Worried about the nearby humans also being affected by the lapse in gravity, Optimus had to decide whether he would order his troops to stop and help the townspeople, or to continue forward and attack the Decepticon base.
Pressing the button on his robot mode chest activates the red lights (well, because the blue ones are expensive for the price point) on his chest, and the sounds and voice phrases (provided by Taitem Kusunoki) were played along with the light-up gimmick. Pressing the button for a few seconds will activate his long voice line with transformation sounds.
By the ‘90s, the genre had begun to fade, and boys' minds turned to more high-impact action, often centered around mutants, monsters, and karate. Hasbro saw potential in the embers of the Transformers brand, and turned it over to newly-acquired subsidiary Kenner for a jump-start. Kenner threw out all the old rules, and invented a line of Transformers that were more poseable, more feature-packed, and more exciting. Backed by a high-tech CGI cartoon, Beast Wars turned the brand around, making Transformers a bestseller again.
This series introduced the dangerous Predacon faction, robotic dragons and mythical creatures that posed a threat to Autobot and Decepticon alike. In response, the 'Bots and 'Cons don new armor (the Autobots in spiky, over-weaponized armor reminiscent of Mad Max, while the Decepticons take on more beastly traits) and are armed with new gimmick-laden launching/spinning weapons. On-package bios were reduced in length to just a sentence or two, and the instruction sheets instead feature facts about one of the figure's main weapons, as well as a chapter of the Tales of the Beast Hunters prose story.

For reasons unknown, his ion blaster was sculpted with a large, rectangular handle, requiring accommodating fists. In order to make use of the other weapons in the line (like his own rocket launcher and the solitarium weapons), he comes with an extra pair of replacement fists with smaller, circular peg-holes. This replacement-fist method is also used to plug in his clear-plastic energy axe.
Exclusive to Walmart, this Deluxe Class Optimus Prime is an all-new mold, close in scale to Voyager Class Megatron. He has a high range of motion, with ball jointed shoulders and hips, swivels at the neck, knees, and feet, and double swivels in the elbows. As a result of the transformation process, he can also rotate at the waist, though this is hindered considerably by his "backpack" kibble. This can be remedied by pointing the truck nose downward, as it is in the packaging. Optimus Prime also features the spring loaded "Automorph" feature in his head, if the truck kibble pushes the small grey switch from his back before splitting the chest into half.
Although Cybertron's Energon stocks were destroyed, the Autobots discovered a recording pointing to the Logicon planet Metascan Alpha, which had Energon in abundance. Optimus ordered Hot Rod and Ultra Magnus to take a team each to find the planet. The Autobots discovered they were being spied on by the Decepticon Clones, and Optimus swore that Galvatron could pay. He led a team to the derelict space destroyer which the Decepticons were using for a base and fought their leader one-on-one. As he was about to destroy the Nullification Cannon, Scorponok took a swing at him which connected instead with the Cannon, obliterating it. Optimus was helped away from the destruction by Blurr and Sureshot. The War Against the Destructons, Chapter 1 of 3
Available in the Timelines "Generation 2" 2-pack alongside Sgt. Hound at BotCon 2015, General Optimus Prime is a redeco of Generations Voyager Class Roadbuster based on the cancelled Generation 2 General Optimus Prime toy. He transforms into an off-road vehicle and comes with numerous weapons, all of which peg via 5mm post onto his vehicle rear/legs, shoulders, upper & lower arms, and hands: a spring-loaded, missile-firing launcher, a pistol, a rifle, and two small cannons that respectively form the scope and stock of the rifle. All of his weapons can combine to form an unwieldy superweapon. It was unknown if this figure has the loose ratcheted shoulder joints from the Legends release of the mold.
Long before the internet came along and ruined life as we knew it, Children amused themselves with the most primitive of toys. At the top of the food chain was the yo-yo. Believed to date back to around 500 B.C. in Greece, and even believed to have been used as a crude weapon in the Philippines, the yo-yo (pronounced yo-yo) made a roaring comeback in the 1920s as a toy, and to a lesser extent as a weapon.
Voyager figures all feature a spring-loaded MechTech-style transforming weapon, partially constructed from translucent plastic, which lights up via LED when the weapon is deployed. The figures themselves also feature translucent plastic, so the moving LED creates the image of energon power "flowing" from the character's bodies into their weapons. This worked better in theory than in practice. Internally, these figures were referred to by Hasbro as "Powerizers".
Though the figure does a much better job of conveying the on-screen character model than the ROTF Leader Class mold did, there are still a few inaccuracies—most notably the forearm and shoulder pad designs and the head/torso proportions. The final product also lacks certain paint details visible in stock and packaging imagery, such as the blue rings on his feet and the gold on his pelvis. It should be noted that this mold does not combine with Jetfire.
Standing only two-and-a-quarter inches tall, Smallest Transforming Transformers Optimus Prime was the smallest fully transforming G1 Optimus toy for a while, at least until the release of his chubby super-deformed Q-Transformers versions. He features an accurate transformation sequence based on the original full-sized toy, replacing the detachable hands with actual sculpted fists, and even including a tiny version of his laser rifle. Unsurprisingly, he also has little articulation and is only capable of moving his arms and legs.
During the promotion of the Transformers films, Optimus Prime appeared in several commercials. Optimus Prime, along with other Transformers, were featured in several commercials for General Motors. Scenes with Optimus Prime were used in several General Motors commercials.[48] A commercial for the Discovery Channel featured Optimus Prime singing part of a promotional song.[49]
The series begins when Optimus and his crew, after picking up a disillusioned ninja named Prowl, are sent to clear rubble from a space bridge passage. There, the Autobots stumbled upon the Allspark and are immediately attacked by Megatron's battle cruiser, the Nemesis. Through treachery by Megatron's second-in-command, Starscream, Megatron was fragged and the Autobots crashed on Earth in the early 21st century. After being in stasis under Lake Erie for 50 years, the Autobots awaken in Detroit of the near future, where they immediately discovered humans in need and became heroes of the city after stopping a Sumdac Industries experiment gone wrong. During the battle for the possession of the Allspark, Optimus goes offline after defeating Starscream, only to be revived by Sari Sumdac and her Allspark-infused key.
Optimus & Shreddicus were initially exclusive to San Diego Comic-Con 2017, where they sold out. A small portion of the run had been held for future sales: Hasbro Toy Shop put the set up for sale for about five minutes on August 14 before selling out. The remainder was available at HasCon 2017's exclusives booth, but again they burned through the stock very quickly.
This new roughly 11-inch leader-sized mold of Optimus Prime transforms from a robot to trailer/truck combination and back, with the transformation taking cues from both the Reveal the Shield Legends Class and the Robots in Disguise Legion Class toys. Surprisingly, he does have a reasonable amount of articulation, including a balljointed head and hinged joints for his arms, shoulders and legs, plus lateral hinges for his feet. His head includes light-piping and, unlike other Cyber Series toys, his truck windows have actual transparent plastic rather than just being merely painted.
The final waves of this line, released in early 2014, really pushed towards younger kids, with incredibly simplified designs based on the characters' Cyberverse releases, which actually allowed the toys to be larger than most others in their size class. Unfortunately, as they were tail-enders, their US releases were nearly nonexistant: only the Voyagers made it out at US retail, and only through discount chains like Ross and TJ Maxx. The rest ended up released only overseas (not even Canada got them!).
In late 1993, Hasbro relaunched the Transformers franchise with the Generation 2 line, with production again largely being done by Takara. The subgroups concept was done away with for the first year, but there were no new molds or characters. Generation 2 re-used the molds for many of the characters from the 1984 and 1985 line, but with mostly different color schemes and finishes, as well as different weapons and accessories. Megatron's figure was released later on. As noted previously, Megatron's original alternate mode, or "transformation identity", was a handgun with attachments, but in Generation Two, this was changed to a tank due to safety and security concerns. Most of the 1994 figures were re-releases or recolors of European G1 releases.
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