Rodimus Prime is a fictional robot superhero character from the Transformers robot superhero franchise. He was formerly known as Hot Rod and was first seen in The Transformers: The Movie but was reformatted into Rodimus Prime when he received the Autobot Matrix of Leadership from his mentor, Optimus Prime, the leader of the Autobots, and assumed the role of the movie's protagonist. Hasbro has used the names Autobot Hot Rod, Rodimus, and Hot Shot as replacements for later characters, due to trademark issues with the name Hot Rod. His alternate mode varies between depictions, but usually possesses a red, yellow, and silver paint job.
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Designated "Optimus Prime" rather than the traditional Japanese "Convoy", this figure is a redeco of the previous Music Label Convoy figure into the character's traditional red, blue and silver color scheme. Unlike previous re-issues of the mold, iPod Optimus Prime's sports a paint application similar to KissPlayers Convoy, having its ABS/PVC parts painted over with a thin layer of his iconic red, white (silver if you will) and blue motif paint applications (with the exception of his iPod docking trailer). This includes his trailer, though the effect is somewhat marred by the large, visible gap on one side. When reconfigured into dock mode, the interior surfaces surrounding the speakers are decorated with black-on-silver techno-patterns as well as three "Optimus Prime" logos. The recessed space also features a stylised, almost Frank Milleresque, high-contrast portrait of Prime's face, although this is largely covered when an iPod is inserted. The figure comes in identical packaging to the original Music Label Convoy, save for the addition of a sticker illustrating the different color of its contents.
Part of the first wave of Bot Shots Series 1 launchers, this repaint of Optimus Prime comes with a large trailer that pops open to form a battle station with a spring-loaded launching platform. He appears to have the same plastic colors as the single release, and the same set of paint operations, but his paint is done in different shades, having glossy dark blue paint and glossy bright red paint. The black part of his launcher is sculpted to look vaguely like the repair done that is part of Generation 1 Optimus Prime's repair bay.

Though he was packaged on an individual box, he was initially sold as part of a set with Dark Energon Megatron. He was eventually made available on his own, and all of the Dark Energon Series toys were eventually made available in Singapore as mass-retail releases. The Voyager Class toys, in particular, also saw mass-retail release in the Philippines.
When I was a child in the 1960s, I bought most of my own Lego, using money from paper routes I had from the ages of 7-16. But the items I bought we not ‘kits’. They were small boxes of standard bricks. Each box contained only a single shape and colour, but you could find most of the basic shapes 1×1 or 1×2 or 1×4 or 1×8, 2×2 or 2×3 or 2×4, bevels, doors or windows, if you found the right box. The boxes were only 50 cents, and had an average of 12 bricks per box. That works out out to about 4-5 cents per brick. The kits were expensive, but buying the standard boxes was a lot cheaper, and that is what most people did back then. With my paper route, at the age of 7 I could buy 100 pieces per week using my own money. Name any 7 year old that afford to do that now!
Transformers GT "GT-R Prime" is a heavy retool of Alternity Convoy, transforming into a 1:32 replica of the Motul Autech GT-R race car used by the Nismo team in the Super GT racing championship series. He retains the flip-out blasters of the Alternity toy and can also wield his new Impact Wrench Gun accessory (also called the "Optimus Rifle" on the Transformers GT website), a weapon based on the impact wrenches used in car repairs. Like all GT toys, Prime also comes with a GT Sister, poseable human figures themed after race queens, his partner being a lady named Misaki.
In one possible sequence of events, Powerglide was captured and reprogrammed by the Decepticons, leading their army to Autobot headquarters. Taken by surprised, the Autobots were felled one by one until only Optimus remained. As Megatron gloated that he would not kill Optimus, only alter him so as to make him the bane of humanity, Optimus activated the Ark’s self-destruct sequence, taking all of the Decepticons with him in a fiery explosion.

The original Optimus Prime toy started life as the Diaclone toy, "Battle Convoy", created by a team of Takara designers who came on board when the original designer fell behind. This team included Hiroyuki Obara (listed as the sole creator on the toy's patent) and famed mecha designer Shōji Kawamori. The toy transforms into two major components; the first component being a red and blue White Freightliner WFT-8664T cabover semi-trailer truck partially composed of die-cast metal, and the second component being a large silver trailer of currently-undetermined model.


↑ The African American entrepreneur: then and now By W. Sherman Rogers page 321. Books.google.com. http://books.google.com/books?id=mbTUorcuXkoC&pg=PA321&dq=%22generation+2%22+transformers&hl=en&ei=woyoTPq8KI7hnQeIwOWjDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CD8Q6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=%22generation%202%22%20transformers&f=false. Retrieved 2011-04-04.
This unusual iteration of Optimus Prime is a redeco of Beast Wars 10th Anniversary Optimus Primal, transforming into a robotic gorilla in the pseudo-technorganic-looking style of the other Jungle Planet toys. He comes with a Jungle Planet Cyber Key stamped with the code d7s9, which plugs into his flying surfboard accessory to reveal a spring-loaded missile launcher. His brown and cream deco seems inspired by Donkey Kong, while the scar over his beast mode eye seems intended to homage Peter Jackson's King Kong.
Many who received their first LEGO set in the early 1990’s are now adults looking forward to buying a LEGO set for their first child or for themselves. When we are younger, we do not fully understand how money works. We do not realize that a large LEGO set can require hours of work to earn. We only know what we want. I would wager that it isn’t until our first jobs that we can fully appreciate the value of money. We all wanted the large sets as kids and we didn’t realize how hard our parents had to work for them.
If Optimus ordered his troops to attack the Decepticon base, they soon reached an area free of the anti-gravity beam’s influence. They were then attacked by a small fleet of Decepticons. Optimus targeted their squad leader, Dirge, knowing that by downing him, the Decepticons would be significantly demoralized. Dirge was forced to break-off his attack when his back-up was taken out, knowing he wouldn’t be able to take Optimus on without it. Losing their advantage quickly, the Decepticons retreated. But with the battle over, the Autobots noticed a small human boy at their feet. The boy was Buddy, a stowaway from the nearby town, and though Optimus was displeased with the tag-along, the Autobots could not spare the time to bring him home. Arriving at the Decepticon base, Megatron delivered an ultimatum; if the Autobots did not surrender Optimus Prime to the Decepticons immediately, he would use his gravity beam to have the nearby humans float off into space.
The term Generation 1 is a retronym; the series was simply known as "Transformers" until the release of the Generation 2 series. However, the term has become semi-official, as both Hasbro and Takara have referred to this era as "Generation 1". New characters are still occasionally added to the line, primarily by E-hobby. (Examples: Sunstorm, Hauler, Detritus, and the like.) Large-scale production of new characters in this line ended with the onset of Generation 2. Transformers fans often are very upheld with the G1 community. This has led to controversy among fans who consider G1 to be the only "pure" form of Transformers.
The cab is yet another iteration of the original Optimus Prime/Convoy toy, based on the Ultra Magnus retool, as distinguished by the elongated hubcap pegs on the front wheels. Indeed, the iPod-aesthetic, all-white deco would make you think this figure should be Magnus, but no, the packaging clearly says "Convoy", making it twice in one year that Takara has released a white-redeco Prime that isn't Magnus.
Punch reported back to Optimus on what he had learned about the Decepticons as Counterpunch. Mainly, that they were planning on attending BotCon 2010. Optimus then turned to Teletraan I for more information about BotCon. Upon learning that special honors would be held for him at the convention, Optimus led his troops to BotCon once more. BotCon 2010 Promo
If Optimus ordered his troops to come to the humans’ aid, they found themselves taking part in a struggle in futility, as the entire town was near-weightless, meaning they couldn’t put the humans anywhere where they wouldn’t float away once more. Then, the Autobots heard Decepticons approaching. Helpless in their current position, the Autobots were quickly eradicated by the Decepticons.
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