• Optimus Prime  • Rodimus  • Ultra Magnus  • Alpha Trion  • Arcee  • Blaster  • Blurr  • Brawn/X-Brawn  • Bulkhead  • Bumblebee/Goldbug  • Cliffjumper  • Elita One  • Hoist  • Hot Shot  • Hound  • Ironhide  • Jazz  • Jetfire  • Kup  • Metroplex  • Mirage  • Omega Supreme  • Perceptor  • Powerglide  • Primus  • Prowl  • Ratchet  • Red Alert  • Sandstorm  • Smokescreen  • Seaspray  • Sentinel Prime  • Sideswipe  • Springer  • Wheeljack  • Wheelie  • Wreck-Gar
Hasbro's Toys R Us-exclusive 2003 reissue of Powermaster Optimus Prime was actually a modified version of Takara's then-recently reissued God Ginrai set. As such, the cab was partly constructed out of die-cast metal, vacuum-metalized plastic and had clear blue windows. The trailer was retooled so the super robot's fists could slide in and out of the arms. This set also included the originally Japanese-exclusive Apex Bomber drone trailer that attached onto the back of Optimus Prime's trailer in vehicle mode, and could become extra armour in super robot mode.The missiles where unchromed and lengthened due to safety issues as opposed to the Japanese release which were chromed and shorter.
Beast Wars: Transformers had to be renamed in some countries, particularly Canada, because of concern over the word "war" in the title. So, in some countries, it was released under the title Beasties. Long-time Transformers fans noticed the prominence of the words "Beast Wars" over "Transformers", the latter appearing in small type under the former. The Transformers' fan base splintered into two groups as a direct result, with the one enjoying Beast Wars for what it was and the other refusing to accept it as official canon in the Transformers mythology.
In the wake of this incident, the transformers managed to reclaim much of Cybertron. Mindful of the dangers of allowing humans like Cobra access Cybertronian technology, Prime sent Perceptor, Grimlock, Arcee, and Bumblebee on a mission to Earth. As it turned out, Prime's fears were well founded. The U.S. government had used parts from Megatron to create Serpent O.R., a cyborg designed to be a perfect weapon. A raid by Cobra allowed it to escape and gather an army of Decepticons on Cybertron, killing Bumblebee in the process. Despite the grief of losing Bumblebee, Prime continued on and rallied his comrades to do the same. Attacking the Autobot capital city, Serpentor's forces proved overwhelming, and Prime surrendered to ensure the Decepticons would cease fire and not kill another comrade. Realizing that Serpentor wanted the Autobot Matrix of Leadership, Prime broke free as Serpentor was distracted, but was unable to kill him. He was promptly attacked and nearly beaten to death by Razorclaw and Motormaster. He was subsequently forced to watch as Serpentor opened the Matrix. In doing so, Serpentor was not only reformatted into a transformer-like mechanoid, but was also shown the futility of the fighting by the Matrix. At this point, Cobra Commander was able to take control of Serpentor's body. In an attempt to stop him, Hawk opened the Matrix and was transformed into a great leader, rendering Cobra Commander comatose. As the Joes prepared to head home, Prime promised to record the Hawk-led humans' future.
Thanks to TFW2005 user Fc203, we have some screencaps from what appears to be a stop-motion review video featuring Studio Series Shatter, among other Transformers and non-Transformers toys. The screencaps give us a good look at her robot and alt mode as well as a few poses. Like her partner Dropkick, Shatter only comes with one alt mode. However, that alt mode is her car mode and not her aircraft mode; whereas Dropkick is the opposite. She also seems to be sporting a bit more of a generic head that isn’t quite movie-accurate, but the rest of the figure seems to pay a good deal of homage to her pre-jet mode on-screen model.
Optimus Prime's Japanese name is "Convoy", which is named after his original name "Battle Convoy" in the Diaclone toyline, because the name "Optimus Prime" is difficult for Japanese kids to remember and pronounce.[2] All Optimus-inspired characters were called variations of Convoy in Japan up until the 2007 Transformers film, at which point TakaraTomy changed their minds and began using the name Optimus Prime as well. Presumably to avoid confusion, this change includes the Generation 1 version of the character as well, who is now called Optimus Prime in newer products and fiction such as Transformers United and Transformers: All Spark, though his name remains Convoy in material aimed at adult collectors such as Alternity and Masterpiece.
Fellow Seibertronian Actar has written an in depth review on the new Transformers Studio Series Jetfire. He gave us great images of all modes including the combined mode and the giant cannon. We see how it scales with both SS ROTF Megatron and the ROTF Fallen. Enjoy! Alrighty! Just got my hands on the latest SS Voyagers and Leaders. However, the one that has won me over the most is Jetfire. So, I was rather hesitant and critical about Jetfire when I first saw him, but - Read More
On the rocky plains where practically every Transformer battle ever seems to happen, Prime arrived in his Powermaster body to back up three of his troops against Dreadwind and Darkwing. He combined with Hi-Q and transformed, attacking with his trailer's battle station mode. Optimus then combined with the trailer to become a "Super Powermaster" and continue the attack. Who won? Find out in Marvel Comics! Powermasters commercial

This toy's design has directly and indirectly influenced numerous others over the years, including many future versions of Generation One Optimus Prime himself as well as new interpretations of the character for Armada, the live-action movie, and Transformers Animated. Redecos of those toys have in turn spread the toy's iconic look to several other characters and many of their subsequent toys: Ultra Magnus, Scourge, and the various Nemesis Primes. Additionally, a toy that was originally intended to be the original Optimus Prime was eventually retconned to be the new character Optimus Primal, bringing Prime's appearance over to that character (and eventually Primal Prime as well.) In Japan, this began a tradition of Beast Era Convoys emulating Prime's look, spawning still more toys that trace part of their lineage back to this one.

This gold vacuum metallized (save for his black joints, which they were made out of unpaintable plastic) Protoform Optimus Prime figure was featured as a Lucky Draw giveaway (along side similarly gold vac-metal versions of Voyager class Optimus Prime and Protoform Starscream) in the December 2007 issue of TV Magazine. Released in 2008, only 5 pieces were made, making it one of the rarest Lucky Draw figures; the images at right represent the only known photographs of it.
Though Prime's ultimate fate is unknown, in a story entitled "The Last Days of Optimus Prime", also from Transforce, Prime laments the new Transformers age without war and passes on to a Transformers afterlife, referred to as "J'nwan". The story is vague, however, and may be a metaphor for Prime rejoining the Matrix, as his time had come. In this realm, he was approached by the Predacon Sandstorm, who tried to plead for the help of Prime and the other legendary Transformers in dealing with a Unicron/Predacon hybrid named Shokaract. Prime refused, but later led a group of Transformers, including Megatron, Grimlock, and Soundwave), to distract the creature while Primus dealt the final blow.

A redeco of the first Sports Label Convoy, this figure transforms into a white, navy, and grey sneaker. Promotional images for the figure depicted its robot mode as white and aqua-blue, but the finished product was visibly darker, produced in shades of off-white and dark teal. In either coloration, it sure as heck looks like it should be Ultra Magnus, but for whatever reason... it ain't.
The final waves of this line, released in early 2014, really pushed towards younger kids, with incredibly simplified designs based on the characters' Cyberverse releases, which actually allowed the toys to be larger than most others in their size class. Unfortunately, as they were tail-enders, their US releases were nearly nonexistant: only the Voyagers made it out at US retail, and only through discount chains like Ross and TJ Maxx. The rest ended up released only overseas (not even Canada got them!).
Naturally, Optimus Prime got the biggest of the sets in the first year of Kre-O. The set can be built into a large long-nose tractor-trailer rig with a removable "sleeper" cab that hides a computer station, and a trailer that can carry the set's two motorcycles or open up to carry larger car builds. The robot mode build includes a huge Optimus, based largely on the live-action movie Optimus, though with a head based almost directly on the Classics Voyager Optimus. He is armed with a distressingly plain brick that fires pressure-launched missiles (aka his smokestacks). Most of the leftover parts in robot mode become a "headquarters" which is mostly just a random assemblage of mismatched-color panels and a pair of barricades. Both main builds leave numerous parts unused if you go expressly by the instructions, but hey, it's a building kit, surely you can find someplace to apply most of them.
1. Color diversity: Back in the 80s, most sets were comprised of a few basic colors; red, blue, yellow, white, gray, and black. It was much easier to acquire a “critical mass” of pieces in each color to start building one’s own creations in coherent color schemes. Space, Town, Castle sets all had the same basic colors. Today Lego uses a much wider array of colors in their sets. While this adds a lot of variety and visual appeal to today’s sets, this means that one has to buy a much larger number of sets (or scour bricklink) to get achieve a workable critical mass of pieces in each color. After buying some of the modern sets, I end up with a few dark-blue or lime-green pieces that I don’t really have enough to much with other than use as accent colors. They end up in my misc color bin in the event I decide to build the set they originally came with or sell them off on bricklink.

This gold vacuum metallized version of Optimus Prime is a prize in Hasbro's Asia Age of Extinction campaign. To qualify for winning this toy, one must be the biggest spender of the day during the midnight launch of the AoE toyline at specific Toys R Us or participate in a lucky draw. This toy is limited to 7 pieces. 2 are in mainland China, while Hong Kong, Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore, Taiwan each have one.


The Japanese release of Powermaster Optimus Prime actually represented a new character named Ginrai, and featured several retools: the cab featured die-cast metal, shortened smokestacks, vacuum-metalized plastic and clear blue windows, while the trailer was given retractable super robot fists. This Japanese version was eventually issued by Hasbro in 2003 as part of the Commemorative Series collection (see below).
TakaraTomy released another reissue based on the Encore version as part of their Chronicle line in 2011, lacking the original Generation 1 trailer. Instead, the Chronicle version was available in a two-pack with Dark of the Moon Deluxe Class Optimus Prime and a new trailer that could be used by both Optimuses, thanks to a retooled trailer hitch on the Generation 1 Optimus Prime figure.
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