The Transformers toy-line is typically divided into two main factions: the heroic Autobots and their opponents, the evil Decepticons (traditionally known in Japan as the Cybertrons and Destrons, respectively, although more recent releases often using the English terms). Transformers toys are sold at a number of price points, and various Transformers series utilize unique play features.

Reissued in 2003 as part of Takara's Transformers Collection line of reissues. This version (#13 in the Collection series) was retooled from the 2000/2002 Rodimus Major tooling in order to make the fists and engine block hole wide enough to equip Firebolt. In addition, the original 2 guns had their posts modified so that a Targetmaster Hot Rod could still use them, if the owner chose to.


Prime is loaded with a ridiculous number of features and accessories. The robot itself is highly poseable, and both the smokestacks on Prime's shoulders and the fuel tanks on his legs can be rotated forward to act as guns, even featuring sculpted detail to this effect. As ever, he comes with a trailer that opens up into his crazy-detailed Combat Deck, featuring more action features than ever before. In trailer mode alone, it features a flip-down support stand so it can stand alone, a spring-loaded pop-out ramp instead of a fold-down one, and when the trailer is split for transformation, the traditional support legs underneath automatically swing out into place. The trailer houses most of Prime's accessories, including his ion blaster (with a moveable ammo clip to allow for multiple poses) and energon-axe, as well as his classic gas pump accessory, now with a poseable wire instead of a rubber hose. Two fold-out compartments provide storage space for six of Prime's interchangeable fists, while the other two remain attached the robot: two clenched, two open, a pointing right fist, a tilted left fist (for holding the ion blaster's ammo clip), and two fists with slots to grip the miniscule Matrix of Leadership that fits in a tiny chamber in Prime's chest. The Combat Deck's artillery robot features two flip-out handles that Prime can grip as if aiming the drone's guns, and Roller is also included, with three different 3mm ports to hold Prime's gun and gas pump. Lastly, Prime comes with a rocket pack like those used by the Autobots in such Generation 1 cartoon episodes as "Dinobot Island", and a stand shaped like the Autobot insignia that allows him to be displayed in mid-air, as if in flight. The rocket pack also has 3mm ports for Prime's weapons, and stores on the front of the trailer in vehicle mode.
The lowest priced toys in the Armada line were three-packs of Mini-Cons. Each larger price point consisted of an Autobot or Decepticon who came with a Mini-Con partner. Mini-Cons could be used to unlock a variety of features on each larger robot, such as firing weapons, electronic lights and sounds, or alternate modes. Some three-pack Mini-Cons combined into other forms or had additional features. According to the storyline, Mini-Cons also enhanced the power of other Transformers, giving incentive to collect as many of them as possible.
The first in TakaraTomy's Hybrid Style series, Galaxy Convoy is a partly die-cast figure with scaled-down equivalents of the accessories that came with the Leader-class figure. This highly-intricate figure retains all the transformation abilities of the original figure—vehicle, flight mode, robot, and Super Mode—and even its Cyber Key-activated features (even coming with two keys so they can be deployed simultaneously), with additional touches like spring-loaded mechanisms that snap his cannons into place, and hand-grips on the weapons for Super Mode. While he does lack electronics or firing missiles, Prime still includes his Matrix, super-tiny yet still removable, and has four alternate sets of hands: two clenched fists, two with pointing index fingers, two with splayed palms, and two curved hands for holding his various weapon handles. Given the figure's small size, a reconfigurable head was infeasible, so it also comes with an alternate Super Mode head with a mouthplate and crests deployed, though the standard head must be attached in order for the figure to be transformed to vehicle mode.

Distant Thunder was ultimately unsuccessful, but as the universe started to rip apart, a black Optimus Prime clone appeared. The Binaltech universe was split into its own separate continuity, while the original timeline was also restored, stabilizing the multiverse. The clone, friendly to the transformers, proclaimed that the Binaltech universe must be allowed to continue, as it was important to the future. Optimus Prime questioned the black doppelganger, who explained only that he carried "the Protector's" spark, but refused to reveal any more detailed information. Soon after, the clone, who was originally developed by Dr. Archeville as a weapon of evil, ejected the spark that had invaded and taken over the black figure, reverting to its original evil programming. The malevolent Nemesis Prime, no longer just a black version of Optimus, escaped.
Alternatively, if Optimus chose to use the tainted fuel against the Decepticons, he ordered Grapple to carry out the vat outside of headquarters. He then instructed Grapple to lower the vat into a nearby pit, and instructed Jazz to torch the fuel with his flamethrower. He and Jazz waited until the last possible moment to carry out their plan, and once the fuel was lit, they dived to safety inside the Autobot base with the other Autobots. As the toxic cloud successfully turned away the Decepticons, Optimus was surprised to see Sunstreaker once more fully operational. Having been bought enough time, Perceptor was able to successfully cure the poisoned Autobots. Their ranks fully replenished and the Decepticons turning tail meant the Autobots had earned themselves another victory.
When Starscream attacked a power plant with the aid of his brainwashed ally, Skyfire, Prime carried Grimlock to the scene of the battle on the back of his truck mode. The Enemy from the Arctic During the conflict that followed, Prime's suspicions about Wataru were confirmed when the boy manifested a barrier to protect himself and Bumblebee and to help Skyfire overcome the influence of Starscream's mind-controlling helmet. Wataru was a Booster as well! Wataru's Power His past experiences naturally made Prime hesitant to put Wataru's power to use, but Osamu Kihara made the point that Wataru's power was invaluable for hunting down shards of the Energon Cube. Prime and Wataru headed out to investigate a local relic that Kihara suspected was a cube shard, and Wataru's powers soon confirmed the doctor's findings. Just as Prime was about to report back to Kihara, however, Megatron struck, demanding that Prime hand over both the shard and Wataru. Prime attempted to feign ignorance of Wataru's powers, but Megatron ignored his bluff and encouraged him to hand the boy over, lest he cost another Booster their life. Driven into a rage by the stinging barb, Prime violently attacked Megatron with his energon-axe, but as the duel raged, Megatron continued to question Prime's beliefs and his attitude. Unable to deny Megatron's accusation that he had hoped to use Wataru's power to defeat him, Prime lost his concentration and was taken down by the Decepticon leader. Despite what he had learned about a previous Booster dying, Wataru stayed true to Optimus and activated his powers, healing the Autobot's wounds and powering up his energon-axe into a huge sword. Summoning all his energy, Prime took down Megatron with one almighty slash, then collapsed into stasis lock. Optimus Prime's Secret

Part of the first wave of Age of Extinction Custom Kreons, this Optimus comes with a buildable parts rack on which to hang/store his many many extra pieces. His "normal" helmet and blaster are chromed, plus he comes with an extra clear-plastic helmet, torso and legs. He also has a pair of extra arms (originally from the Kre-O Battleship aliens) plus a spare hand, as well as a buildable battle-axe, a buildable smokestack-pack, and an extra Wheeljack-style wing-pack.
Surprisingly, this was also the first Hasbro exclusive transforming Movie Optimus Prime figure to be based on the final design seen in Age of Extinction. He even features the forearms that Prime had before obtaining the Sword of Judgement, which unfortunately means that he is inaccurate to his appearance in the battle of Hong Kong and the entirety of The Last Knight. The sword's blade is still painted as the heated-up version from the concept art.
The centerpiece of the power-up robot mode is Prime's gigantic Ultimax Super Cannon, an electronic light-and-sound weapon the size and mass of a Deluxe figure. The whole cannon attaches to a special socket slightly behind Prime's shoulders, can store on the back or flip over to be gripped in both fists in armor mode, or stored upside-down underneath the trailer in truck mode. When pointed forward, the cannon has a larger helmet styled after Prime's own with a large translucent face shield featuring a painted targeting system. The weapon has three electronic modes: each of two small buttons plays its own weapon-firing noise and flashes one set of lights, while the large pull-switch in the cannon's center plays the sounds of a powerful barrage, flashing both sets of lights and (every third time) finishing off with the declaration "I am Optimus Prime". The Ultimax Super Cannon also has two of its own 5mm ports for even more MechTech firepower. When mounted on his back, the Cannon has two hook-like sections that securely lock into the "backpack", allowing the Ultimax weapon to serve as a handle for Optimus' imaginary "flight" operations.
By the ‘90s, the genre had begun to fade, and boys' minds turned to more high-impact action, often centered around mutants, monsters, and karate. Hasbro saw potential in the embers of the Transformers brand, and turned it over to newly-acquired subsidiary Kenner for a jump-start. Kenner threw out all the old rules, and invented a line of Transformers that were more poseable, more feature-packed, and more exciting. Backed by a high-tech CGI cartoon, Beast Wars turned the brand around, making Transformers a bestseller again.
Hasbro executives, high off the revival of G.I. Joe through the same marketing concept, decided to acquire rights to toys from a variety of Japanese “Super Robot” series. Transformers didn't introduce the concept of super robots to the United States, but for the first time, the genre became widely recognized and popular outside of Japan. As the Transformers brand grew throughout G1, it began to define the genre, and all other super robots were measured competitively to Transformers' standard.

During the May 30 launch event for the Revenge of the Fallen toyline in Japan, Legends Optimus were given out to attendees. The only difference is a sticker on the packaging commemorating the event. Optimus also saw release as a blindpacked figure for the first wave of the Revenge of the Fallen EZ Collection sets. And like all first waves, he comes with a flyer advertising the TakaraTomy releases of the Revenge of the Fallen toyline. His pair of legs is also mistranformed to fit in the bubble.
The designs for the original 28 figures were made by Kojin Ono, Takashi Matsuda, Hideaki Yoke, Hiroyuki Obara, and Satoshi Koizumi. Hasbro would go on to buy the entire toy line from Takara, giving them sole ownership of the Transformers toy-line, branding rights, and copyrights, while in exchange, Takara was given the rights to produce the toys and the rights to distribute them in the Japanese market.
In search of new energy sources, Optimus led a team to central South America. When they spotted Mount Sheelah, their two human friends John and Tim Gordon explained volcanoes, and, believing it to be of possible use, the Autobots went to examine it. During a battle with the Decepticons over the volcano, Optimus was convinced by the two humans to retreat, ultimately saving them when Mount Sheelah erupted. Terror of Mount Sheelah After discovering that the Decepticons were kidnapping humans, Optimus sent Bumblebee to scout the Decepticon base. When Bumblebee returned with the Decepticons' global crystal, Optimus was able to use it to blackmail the Decepticons into letting the humans go. Bumblebee to the Rescue
Designated "Optimus Prime" rather than the traditional Japanese "Convoy", this figure is a redeco of the previous Music Label Convoy figure into the character's traditional red, blue and silver color scheme. Unlike previous re-issues of the mold, iPod Optimus Prime's sports a paint application similar to KissPlayers Convoy, having its ABS/PVC parts painted over with a thin layer of his iconic red, white (silver if you will) and blue motif paint applications (with the exception of his iPod docking trailer). This includes his trailer, though the effect is somewhat marred by the large, visible gap on one side. When reconfigured into dock mode, the interior surfaces surrounding the speakers are decorated with black-on-silver techno-patterns as well as three "Optimus Prime" logos. The recessed space also features a stylised, almost Frank Milleresque, high-contrast portrait of Prime's face, although this is largely covered when an iPod is inserted. The figure comes in identical packaging to the original Music Label Convoy, save for the addition of a sticker illustrating the different color of its contents.
The second Nightwatch Optimus Prime was released as part of the "AllSpark Power" second half of the Movie line. He is similar to the UK version of Nightwatch Prime, replacing most of his red and blue with different shades of blue and black, retaining his resemblance to Diaclone Powered Convoy in most respects. However, the subdued black and copper on the first Nightwatch Prime have been replaced with gold and a very bright blue, to signify the All Spark energy affecting the Transformers.
Exclusive to Walmart, this Deluxe Class Optimus Prime is an all-new mold, close in scale to Voyager Class Megatron. He has a high range of motion, with ball jointed shoulders and hips, swivels at the neck, knees, and feet, and double swivels in the elbows. As a result of the transformation process, he can also rotate at the waist, though this is hindered considerably by his "backpack" kibble. This can be remedied by pointing the truck nose downward, as it is in the packaging. Optimus Prime also features the spring loaded "Automorph" feature in his head, if the truck kibble pushes the small grey switch from his back before splitting the chest into half.
The Japanese release of Powermaster Optimus Prime actually represented a new character named Ginrai, and featured several retools: the cab featured die-cast metal, shortened smokestacks, vacuum-metalized plastic and clear blue windows, while the trailer was given retractable super robot fists. This Japanese version was eventually issued by Hasbro in 2003 as part of the Commemorative Series collection (see below).
In April 2007, photos of a repainted Alternators Mirage, in a color scheme similar to Kiss Players Hot Rodimus, and in Alterators-style "fishbowl" packaging began to appear on the internet. Simply called Rodimus, the 27th Alternator lacks almost all of the Kiss Players accessories, including the fishing pole, but keeps the new head sculpt. This figure also sports the classic "flame" detailing in lieu of the Kiss Player's white stripes, while the vanity plate reads "TOO HOT". Rodimus was first sold as a convention exclusive at the 2007 San Diego Comic-Con. The Monday after the convention, it was made available on the Hasbro Toy Shop website, where it would sell out that same morning. The instructions present an alternate name for the figure: Rodimus Prime; whether this is merely an oversight is unknown.
Softimus Prime is, as his name suggests, a plush G1 Optimus Prime toy. Obviously, he has no problems with articulation and passes the drop test with flying colors. His main draw is the ability to "transform" into his Freightliner FL86 vehicle mode by turning the plush toy inside out, his transformation roughly similar to the Powermaster cab Prime's. He is love, in bed.

Prime: First Edition Matrix of Leadership Optimus Prime converts from robot mode to his truck mode. He comes with a gun than he can wield with his hands, as well as peg onto his hitch in vehicle mode, with different pegs for either configuration. Similar to a previous Optimus Prime toy, he features some faux-kibble in the form of his actual windshield chest being covered by sculpted panels featuring his characteristic windshield-chest. His arms are slightly longer than his original design's arms.

In true Prime style, forward portion of the vehicle mode detaches to become Prime himself, while the rear "trailer" transforms into a gun emplacement. In robot mode, the barrel of the truck's left cannon detaches to become a hand-held rifle for Prime, and the figure features an opening chest compartment concealing a removable Matrix of Leadership accessory. Prime's gigantic hands mean that he can't hold it especially neatly, but he can certainly grip hold of it. Atypical of both most Unicron Trilogy figures and indeed, Optimus Primes in general, Prime's hands are not designed to accommodate weapons with 5mm posts, instead featuring a small peg-hole in his palm that allows him to tightly grip objects designed to fit there, like his own rifle, Leobreaker's whip, Cybertron Wing Saber's swords, and Cybertron Metroplex's axe. However Cybertron Wing Saber's sword hilts will also act as adaptors allowing Prime to hold and use 5mm weapons.
In 1989, the entire line became limited to Pretenders and Micromasters. For the first time, the Transformers received a new design for their title logo. But many also regarded this as a time of a dearth in creativity and the lowest point in the toyline's history. The year 1990 saw the last American burst with the release of more Micromaster characters and the introduction of the Action Masters, non-transforming action figures who came with Transforming companions. Larger Action Master sets came with transforming vehicles and bases. The Action Master line was criticized for its perceived desperation for a gimmick, although it had a few defenders. The line predictably faded and would be the last Transformers output in the US until 1992.

This Voyager-sized Optimus Prime is an all new mold (with a similar transformation scheme to Age of Extinction Voyager Class Galvatron, notably the shoulders, rooftop backpack, and the leg/wheels combo) based on his Leader Class figure. He features a similar but different transformation scheme, which results in a somewhat clean robot mode, although most of his vehicle kibble hangs on his back. He also features the sword & the shield based on his final design in the movie, albeit the sword being painted similarly to the Armor Knight Optimus Prime's sword. His Sword can store underneath his Vehicle mode or his robot mode backpack, while the shield can be stored on the truck's fifth wheel hitch, which can also tow the trailer included from the Japanese exclusive Mechtech Voyager. Although the pectoral armor can be slightly pushed up a little bit further, the pieces have to actually stop at where the rectangular pegholes are located.

What I find more interesting is who’s in this wave. Not only is there Hot Rod and Barricade in ’80s muscle car form, but Optimus Prime in his red G1 Peterbilt truck form (just with movie Optimus’ head! Maybe Bumblebee will explain the origin of his “rip off everyone’s face” fetish). Two versions of Bumblebee round out the wave, his traditional movie-verse Camaro and G1 VW Bug.
Although the original Japanese incarnation of Transformers: Cybertron, known as Transformers: Galaxy Force, was produced apart from Armada and Energon, the series, as originally conceived by Hasbro, was as the third part of the trilogy. The English language dub of the series treats it as such.[50] Consequently, inconsistencies arise between Cybertron and the other two series, but have been explained by the Cybertron comic book, available exclusively through the Official Transformers Collectors Club, as the result of fluctuations in the fabric of reality caused by the Unicron-induced black hole.

The Japanese release of Powermaster Optimus Prime actually represented a new character named Ginrai, and featured several retools: the cab featured die-cast metal, shortened smokestacks, vacuum-metalized plastic and clear blue windows, while the trailer was given retractable super robot fists. This Japanese version was eventually issued by Hasbro in 2003 as part of the Commemorative Series collection (see below).

Q-Transformers Optimus Prime is a super deformed toy based on his Age of Extinction design, transforming into a cute little Western Star 4900 SB. It was sold as an exclusive at Transformers Expo months before the proper release of the toyline. Being only one inch and a half tall, this is actually the smallest transformable figure of movie-verse Optimus Prime, and it even gets close to being the tiniest transformable Optimus Prime ever made if it wasn't for another slightly smaller Q-Transformers release.
A retool and repaint, including really shiny chrome, of Revenge of the Fallen Leader class Optimus Prime. In this version, his dark-blue is replaced with a more purplish color and his orange blades have become translucent with some silver. Also, his fuel tanks detach and combine to form his Ion Blaster and his mouth is now visible. Unfourtanetly, all that chrome makes it even harder for him to transform than the last prime. All of these new things make him even more accurate to the movie than his predecessor. Like the picture on the right says, Buster Optimus Prime was rereleased, this time with his mouthplate, in an exclusive set with a redecoed Jetfire.
Released exclusively in Asia, Shadow Spark Optimus Prime is a redeco of the Age of Extinction Leader Class Optimus Prime, featuring dark grey plastics, weathered deco patterns, and some opaque plastic which was recasted from transparent plastics. He features a scratched Autobot insignia on the right side of his sleeper-cab, and a Cyberglyphic on the left side of the front hood. Some weathered parts does not match well with some other parts (the fenders, for example).

1. Color diversity: Back in the 80s, most sets were comprised of a few basic colors; red, blue, yellow, white, gray, and black. It was much easier to acquire a “critical mass” of pieces in each color to start building one’s own creations in coherent color schemes. Space, Town, Castle sets all had the same basic colors. Today Lego uses a much wider array of colors in their sets. While this adds a lot of variety and visual appeal to today’s sets, this means that one has to buy a much larger number of sets (or scour bricklink) to get achieve a workable critical mass of pieces in each color. After buying some of the modern sets, I end up with a few dark-blue or lime-green pieces that I don’t really have enough to much with other than use as accent colors. They end up in my misc color bin in the event I decide to build the set they originally came with or sell them off on bricklink.
Besides the inordinate number of Hogwarts Castles, we can draw similar conclusions from this chart as we can from the Pirate Ship Chart. The prices really have not changed that much in the measurable time-frame2. The weighted average for all the castles is 10.56 cents per piece. As with the Pirate Ships, there does seem to be a general increase in piece count, however.

Of particular note to Prime completists is that this otherwise traditional reissue of the Generation One Prime cab has a brand-new head sculpt which is essentially a miniaturisation of the Masterpiece/20th Anniversary Prime's noggin. Not only does this give the "classic" Prime toy a more show-accurate head, it's also the first iteration of this familiar mould in which the head is actually poseable. Being one of the better-articulated early Generation One toys, Prime can finally look in any direction he can aim.
Although the character was redesigned to some extent, like the other characters in the film, many classic design elements remain in his robot mode including a predominantly red torso, primarily blue legs, the presence of windows in his chest, smoke stacks on his shoulders, and a head design influenced by the original, featuring the iconic faceplate and ear finials. The faceplate is able to retract to reveal a mouth. His weapons include his iconic ion blaster stored in the form of the fuel tanks on his back, and a shell cannon stored on his back, two retractable energon blades that extend from both forearms, which is a homage to Prime's energy axe in the Generation 1 animated series, two retractable energon hooks on both of his forearms, and bladed knuckles. The trailer contains an energy axe, a shield, and flight gear. In the later IDW comics, he displays the ability to produce a holographic driver.
Due to the interference of Ravage, the same as the one who appears in the Beast Wars, most of the events of the original animated feature do not transpire. The most influential of these events is the Battle of Autobot City. Because this battle did not occur, Optimus Prime and Megatron do not have their final showdown. This means that, for this continuity, Optimus Prime does not die and Megatron is never reformatted into Galvatron. As a result, Optimus Prime is able to lead the Autobots during the Binaltech saga.

Reissued in 2003 as part of Takara's Transformers Collection line of reissues. This version (#13 in the Collection series) was retooled from the 2000/2002 Rodimus Major tooling in order to make the fists and engine block hole wide enough to equip Firebolt. In addition, the original 2 guns had their posts modified so that a Targetmaster Hot Rod could still use them, if the owner chose to.


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I understand what you’re saying. You want it to be like the Cybertron games of making them look less earth but still have the colors and molds of G1. Because I never knew that G1 actually had their vehicles molds in their Cybertron Alt Molds. I thought that was so stupid having earth vehicles parts on Cybertron. But they had to make the G1 fans and Bay fans happy so they took the cartoon and modernize it with some bayism look. I think they did good but I can see some parts being better.
Yet another Reveal the Shield redeco with the Motorbreath retooling, Convoy is cast in clear red and black plastic. He has been retooled to include a magnet in his right foot, allowing him to interact with Lost Age Battle Command Optimus Prime and Age of Extinction Stomp & Chomp Grimlock. Convoy was available at a variety of 2014 events, including on May 3 at a "Kids Walk" event at Fuji Speedway, in special packaging on May 16 at the "Transformers Celebration 2014" midnight event at the Sunshine City Toys"R"Us store in Ikebukuro, on June 15 at Tokyo Toy Show 2014, at the Aeon Mall in Kasukabe on July 19, and at the "Transformers Expo" event in Yokohama on August 9. Convoy was also available as one of three preorder bonuses for Cloud Roadbuster.
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