A Voyager class figure that transforms from semi-trailer truck to robot. Head features retractable face plate. The figure's main gimmick is a spring-loaded mechanism that spins the lower torso during transformation to robot mode. Trailer detaches and transforms into a giant Ion Axe or jet pack. Prime's gun can be filled with a small amount of water. Some variants of the figure come with the Autobot symbol printed on his left shoulder while others do not.
Part of the first wave of 2012 Generations Deluxe Class toys, Optimus Prime is based on his Fall of Cybertron design, and transforms from a robot to a Cybertronian truck and back. His ion cannon, based on a weapon seen in his concept art, can mount via either of its two 5mm posts onto ports on his hands, forearms, back, and shoulder smokestacks. The toy is known for being oddly small for an Optimus Prime toy, especially when compared to other toys from the same line. This allows him to be more or less in scale with Grimlock and Bruticus (likewise from the same line), however. Optimus features sculpted fake wheels on his back.
Part of the first wave of Beast Hunters Series 3 Voyager Class toys, Optimus Prime is functionally an upsized copy of his Beast Hunters Series 3 Cyberverse toy, though with certain sculpted details based on his larger toys, the replacement of his ball joints with more robust ratchet joints, the addition of thigh swivels, and various deco differences. As a result, his complexity is lower than in his previous Voyager Class toys, but he ends up being much, much more massive.
One of the single rarest Lucky Draw Figures in existence, this "Custom Color" redeco of Super Optimus Prime was limited to only one in the world. It was the grand prize of a coloring contest held in Septemeber 2005's TV Magazine, in which entrants colored in lineart of Prime with the deco they wanted to see. The winning entry was in green, blue and gold, while ten runners-up received one of five gold or five silver Lucky Draw versions of Prime.

This creation and expansion of the secondary market in conjunction with LEGO now marketing some of their products to an older audience has made the prices of some old sets increase exponentially.  On the extreme range, there is the UCS Millennium Falcon that is selling new for upwards of $2,000 (and close to $1,500 USED!). It sold for $500 new in 2007. Even non-licensed sets can run a premium, such as the Cafe Corner that was one of the original modular buildings. It was $150 new and now it can sell for over $1,000.


Activision and Traveller's Tales, creators of the Lego Star Wars games, released Transformers: The Game in 2007, accompanied by Transformers Autobots and Transformers Decepticons, to tie in with the live-action feature film for the Sony PlayStation 3, Microsoft Xbox 360, Nintendo Wii, Nintendo DS, PC, Sony PlayStation Portable, and PlayStation 2. The player was able to play as both the Autobots and the Decepticons, pick up and throw objects, and transform at any time. The steering in vehicle mode was compared to that of the Grand Theft Auto games and had a free-roaming environment.

Pressing the button on his robot mode chest activates the red lights (well, because the blue ones are expensive for the price point) on his chest, and the sounds and voice phrases (provided by Taitem Kusunoki) were played along with the light-up gimmick. Pressing the button for a few seconds will activate his long voice line with transformation sounds.
If Sparkplug suggested that the Autobots not worry about subtlety, the entire squad transformed and began prowling the streets in search of Decepticons. Oblivious to the panic they were causing, Optimus assumed that the Decepticons were spotted nearby when a police officer declared that the city was under siege by giant robots. Unable to restore order in time to halt the Decepticons’ plot, Optimus and the rest of his team were destroyed in the ensuing earthquake.
© Andrew Sielen and Reality Prose, 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Andrew Sielen and Reality Prose with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

For this re-release of Masterpiece Convoy, Takara submitted to the biggest desire fans had for the figure and produced a full-size, fully transforming plastic and die-cast metal trailer. The trailer opens up into Convoy's Combat Deck, with storage for its accessories and a functional repair drone, though Roller is conspicuous by its absence. Like the original Combat Deck, the drone can extend through holes in the roof and front of the closed trailer, and the interior has enough room to accommodate one Alternators figure in vehicle mode. Some reports suggest that the paint on this figure's chest chips more easily than past editions.
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The original 1984 Optimus Prime toy was part of Takara's 1983 Diaclone toy line named "Battle Convoy". It was designed by the creative design team of Hiroyuki Obara, Shoji Kawamori, famous for his work in Macross, and Kohjin Ohno.[19] The toy's characteristics, such as the head design and the use of the cab front as the upper torso, have become design elements in nearly every incarnation and variant of Optimus Prime. This particular toy has been reissued multiple times, mostly to commemorate the anniversary of the transformers franchise. Optimus Prime was also released as an Action Master and Powermaster toy in the original transformers toy line.

Calibur Optimus Prime is a retool of the Armor Knight Optimus Prime figure, who is a retool of the original Age of Extinction Leader Class figure, with the fifth wheel hitch now forming his handheld shield based on the one used in Dark of the Moon, which results in a backpack-less robot mode. He also comes with an axe based on the one used in the third film.
With the Japanese Binaltech toy series having transformed into the Kiss Players line, the second figure to be released as a Kiss Players character was Hot Rodimus. Based on the same Ford GT mold as Mirage, Hot Rodimus features several differences from Mirage. First, it has a unique head sculpt, which includes a movable crest to allow a "visor" to be lowered over his eyes, referencing a scene from the animated Transformers Movie during which Hot Rod is on Lookout Mountain. Additionally, it includes a fishing-rod accessory, which can be split and connected in a different configuration to create a tri-barreled arm weapon, reminiscent of Hot Rod's exhaust-pipe blasters. The figure also includes a PVC figurine named Syao Syao and a CD featuring a Kiss Players radio drama. The vehicle mode stays true to the Ford GT's factory color scheme, lacking Hot Rod's signature "flame" detailing, and, like Binaltech, is fully painted. Meanwhile, the robot mode reveals additional orange and yellow body parts, such as the chest, abdomen, arms and hands, as well as flame-like paint applications on the lower arms to link the figure with the original Hot Rod.
© Andrew Sielen and Reality Prose, 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Andrew Sielen and Reality Prose with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
Two custom-made pieces (presented in robot and vehicle mode) by the Hasbro Transformers team as the grand prize for G4TV and Jumpcut's contest for fans to remix selected Transformers clips. Won by TFW2005.com member James Zahn, this one-of-a-kind (well, two-of-a-kind) piece is an almost fully vacuum-metallized Leader-class Optimus Prime in red, silver and blue (based heavily upon Generation 1 Optimus Prime), presented with a custom display base with an embossed silver Autobot insignia and a perspex display case.

Available exclusively from Japanese 7-11 stores, MP-711 is an Ultra Magnus-decoed Convoy—white with green and blue highlighting—themed with 7-Eleven logos. Unlike most MP-10 redecos, he comes with a trailer, Roller, and Spike figure, who is sporting a 7-Eleven uniform. Roller and the combat deck come with 7-Eleven logos, however Convoy's shoulder logos are stickers with the option of a green 7-Eleven logo or the standard Autobot logo on either shoulder.
As the Autobots were having trouble with Rumble, Optimus Prime told them try to use his earthquakes to their advantage, which led to the end of the Decepticon. Prime subsequently ordered the Aerialbots to combine and save Grimlock and Roadblock from falling off a cliff. Wolves As they got closer to the Cobra Terrordrome, however, Prime started regretting getting the Autobots involved with the humans' war. He offered to carry G.I. Joe across the water separating them from the Terrordrome, but told them that Autobots only fight if they have no choice, and they had no reason to fight anymore. Moments later, he saw that Cobra were using innocent prisoners as human shields, and Duke added that anyone who Cobra didn't enslave, they murdered. Filled with righteous anger, Optimus Prime ordered his troops to roll out. Trenches
The first Generation 2 Optimus Prime toy was largely identical in sculpt to the original Generation 1 figure release. While his cab robot retained his original red and blue color scheme, his trailer was recast in black, with the original blue and silver striped sticker replaced with a red and silver one displaying Optimus's name. On the first release of the trailer, the internal components and Roller matched the blue of the cab robot. Later, the internal components were changed to a lighter blue, as was Roller. Another running change followed, making the dark blue of the cab robot match this lighter shade. A bright yellow "Autobot" tampograph was also added to the back of his right leg.
Replacing the weapons of the Hasbro releases, these new Mini-Cons transform into their larger parnter's signature weapons. They came as unassembled, unpainted model kits, similarly using stickers to fill in details. Several Arms Microns also came by themselves in bagged kits, plus there was a metric ton of promotional Microns throughout the line, possibly more than any prior line (even Micron Legend!), and that's not counting the ones that were released during the First Edition series. The Arms Microns also had multiple 5 mm posts and holes, and could be combined into super weapons, plus the larger toys were retooled to have new Arms Micron mounting points.
One of the taglines of the Transformers universe is “more than meets the eye.” It’s meant to suggest, of course, that these robots are not just robots; they can turn into vehicles and boomboxes and dinosaurs. But some of the characters themselves tend to be more than meets the eye. In fact, they can become other Transformers. Megatron becomes Galvatron, Orion Pax becomes Optimus Prime, and Bumblebee becomes Goldbug.
MP-10 Convoy, advertised as a "perfect new model" on its packaging, is an entirely new tooling of Generation 1 Optimus Prime. Convoy is now smaller, making him more in-scale with other recent Masterpiece toys, such as Rodimus, and comes with a trailer and various accessories. While the front of the vehicle mode's cab is an accurate depiction of a mid-to-late-1980s Freightliner FLT cabover, the back half, (which is, as usual, made out of Convoy's legs) is much larger and robot-leggier in proportion. (So much that they sculpt a ladder on each side.)
The morning after a particularly vicious battle, Optimus listened to birdsong and pondered life as a giant robot, before asking Ratchet and Huffer for a damage report. The Autobots were puzzled when the Decepticon Seekers (and Laserbeak and Buzzsaw) did a flyby on their camp, as the Decepticons were similarly damaged after the battle, but Shooting Star reported that the Decepticons were trying to distract them while an attempt was made to secure a broken-down oil truck a few miles away. Optimus took a small group to investigate, and successfully aided the humans in getting their truck moving. Swoop was instrumental in stopping the Decepticon attack, and Optimus commended the Dinobot for his valor. Decepticon Hijack
Optimus Prime was subject to several molding and color variations in his early days. The earliest release of the figure featured larger fists, a gun with a thick, round barrel, a slightly-differently shaped gas pump, grey rockets, a grey Roller, a grey launcher in his Combat Deck, and metal plates in the floor of the Combat Deck (a holdover from the Diaclone version of the toy, to which the magnetic feet of the pilots could cling). In short order, his fists were slimmed down, the gun's barrel was pared down to a more slender form, the gas pump's shape was altered, the rockets and launcher were recast in black plastic, the metal plates were removed from the Combat Deck, and Roller's color was changed to a light blue. Along with Roller's color change, however, the Combat Deck's drone pod also became light blue, and a third running change soon followed that saw it restored to its original darker blue, and Roller changed along with it. These modified components would become the default accessories used by subsequent reissues of the Prime toy would take, though Roller stills fluctuates back and forth between grey and dark blue, depending on how show-accurate each reissue wants to be.
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