Being a Combiner Wars Voyager, Prime is naturally capable of transforming into a torso mode to combine with any 4 Deluxe Class Combiner Wars-style toys, though his packaging call-out has him form Ultra Prime by combining him with Deluxe Class Skydive and Alpha Bravo as the arms, and with Firefly and Decepticon Drag Strip as the legs. He can combine with Sunstreaker, Mirage, Prowl, and Ironhide if one wishes to have an IDW-accurate Optimus Maximus.

This creation and expansion of the secondary market in conjunction with LEGO now marketing some of their products to an older audience has made the prices of some old sets increase exponentially.  On the extreme range, there is the UCS Millennium Falcon that is selling new for upwards of $2,000 (and close to $1,500 USED!). It sold for $500 new in 2007. Even non-licensed sets can run a premium, such as the Cafe Corner that was one of the original modular buildings. It was $150 new and now it can sell for over $1,000.

Ultra Magnus is a redeco of the Diaclone "Powered Convoy" figure, itself a redeco and slight retool of "Battle Convoy", the toy that became the original Optimus Prime figure, sporting a new trailer. One of the last few Diaclone toys to be released in the Transformers toyline, Magnus was recolored from the original toy's dark blue, red and black color scheme into a more patriotic red, white and blue, though his chestplate, which was rendered white in his package art followed a more the blue color scheme of his shoulders. He transforms into a Freightliner COE, towing a car-carrier trailer capable of transporting up to four normal-sized Autobot cars. As with Optimus Prime, his cab transforms into a small robot, which can then combine with the trailer to form a "super robot", although all original Generation 1 fiction prior to the 21st century ignored this and simply rendered the super robot as Magnus's default robot form. To facilitate this combination, Magnus sports a slightly longer front axle than Prime, thereby creating tabs on either side of the cab that slide into grooves in the trailer to help lock the small robot into place. He is armed with a rifle sporting two handles that allow either of his robot modes to hold it, and two shoulder-mounted missile launchers, whose spring-loaded firing mechanism was removed for the Hasbro release of the figure.

Towering at only barely over two inches, this was actually not just the smallest movie-verse Optimus but even the smallest transformable figure of Optimus Prime for a while - ironically enough, being even slightly tinier than the Smallest Transforming Transformers Optimus Prime - that is, until he was later "out-tinied" by two other cute super deformed versions.
Available in a two pack set with Battle Changer Megatron, this Optimus is largely the same as as the single release, with some minor differences. He uses a new "double harness" piece on his torso instead of using two harnesses, leaving more space for his head to grip the neck-post. He also has different windshield decals, and his reds and blues are slightly darker. And, most obviously, he has an additional buildable trailer, though it doesn't really attach to the truck mode in any meaningful way.
Although no scannable badge is located at his robot mode, the badge was located at his combined mode's left shoulder. The badge was impossible to be scanned while in-package due to the obstruction of the spring-loaded combiner chest kibble. Speaking of impossible, the badges on the re-releases of the toy can't be scanned by the game. The instruction sheet amusingly replaces Optimus's last picture in the transformation process with Sideswipe.
The U.S. release of Super Fire Convoy had the Japanese voice replaced with an English voice (with the lines, "Optimus Prime, Maximize!" and "Autobots, Transform"), and Autobot insignias were added on the side panels. Much like the Japanese version, Optimus Prime's normal robot mode can combine with Ultra Magnus (sold separately) to form Omega Prime.[48]
3. Licensed themes: In the 80’s the Lego sets were more generic and interchangeable among themes. There were the basic Space, Town, Castle themes. The color schemes within a theme were more homogeneous (i.e. Blacktron sets or Mtron sets all had a common color scheme). Since there was no “fictional” real life object being copied, piece selection tended to emphasize versatility over “realism”. Almost every Lego set of the past had pictures of alternate models featured on the boxes and instructions that was meant to inspire a child to not just build the model featured in the instructions, but to embark on the mental challenge of making their own creations.
He was only available as an Amazon exclusive in the United States, but was also released at brick and mortar retails in Australia and Hasbro's Asian markets, such as Singapore. Oddly enough, even though the official press release for the figure identifies it as "14 of 30" in Hasbro's Thrilling 30 campaign, the packaging does not sport any such markings.[3] To complicate matters further, a later retrospective by Hasbro on Facebook identifies another product as "14 of 30", which doesn't sport any such markings on its packaging either.[4]
The lowest priced toys in the Armada line were three-packs of Mini-Cons. Each larger price point consisted of an Autobot or Decepticon who came with a Mini-Con partner. Mini-Cons could be used to unlock a variety of features on each larger robot, such as firing weapons, electronic lights and sounds, or alternate modes. Some three-pack Mini-Cons combined into other forms or had additional features. According to the storyline, Mini-Cons also enhanced the power of other Transformers, giving incentive to collect as many of them as possible.
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