Part of the first wave of Bot Shots Series 1 single-packs, Optimus Prime is a teeny little long-nosed semi truck with "trailer", with a spring-loaded automatic transformation to robot mode triggered when his front bumper is pressed. He has a "spinner" in his chest that shows his three attack types and power levels. His truck mode and robot body are influenced by the live-action Optimus Prime, while his head is taken from the original. His blue paint is light and sparkly-metallic, his red paint is dull matte, and his optics are yellow.
As yet another in an increasingly large number of reissues of the original Generation 1 Optimus Prime toy, this entry in the Japanese-exclusive The Transformers Collection line of reissues added a few extra goodies to spice things up. Chiefly, the figure was armed with a new energon-axe, based on the weapon used by Prime in the Generation 1 cartoon episode, "More than Meets the Eye, Part 2", which plugs into either of the headlight-holes that normally accommodate Prime's fists. Additionally, Prime came packaged with a ring binder folder designed to hold the pull-out character file sheets that were included with all the other Transformers Collection reissues. Notably, this figure reinstated the original, thick version of Prime's rifle as the standard for all future Japanese reissues.
Optimus Prime (formerly Orion Pax) is constantly, if not always depicted as having strong moral character, excellent leadership, and sound decision-making skills, and possesses brilliant military tactics, powerful martial arts, and advanced extraterrestrial weaponry. Optimus Prime has a strong sense of honor and justice, being dedicated to building peaceful and mutually beneficial co-existence with humans, the protection of life and liberty of all sentient species.[2] As the current Matrix of Leadership bearer, Optimus Prime is the de facto leader of the Autobots, a faction of a transforming species of synthetic intelligence from the planet Cybertron. The Autobots are constantly waging civil war against a rival faction of transforming robots called Decepticons. According to Bob Budiansky, co-writer of the Transformers series, Dennis O'Neil was responsible for his name.
The Optimus Prime Battle Rig Blaster transforms from a superdeformed amalgamation of his Movie truck and G1 Optimus Prime's truck (indeed pulling G1 Prime's trailer) to a fully G1 robotic forearm and hand with a built in Nerf style gun. By simply placing your hand inside the back of the trailer (I need an adult!) and pulling back on the front of the truck, the gun transforms and folds back into a weapon. It comes with three Nerf N-Strike size whistle darts which can be stored inside the trailer. Although not shown in the image, the truck front splits in half in gun-mode, while the grille acts as a sight. This toy was marketed as 'Optimus Prime Big Rig Blaster' overseas.

Two custom-made pieces (presented in robot and vehicle mode) by the Hasbro Transformers team as the grand prize for G4TV and Jumpcut's contest for fans to remix selected Transformers clips. Won by TFW2005.com member James Zahn, this one-of-a-kind (well, two-of-a-kind) piece is an almost fully vacuum-metallized Leader-class Optimus Prime in red, silver and blue (based heavily upon Generation 1 Optimus Prime), presented with a custom display base with an embossed silver Autobot insignia and a perspex display case.


The figure's transformation scheme is based on the original G1 figure, the only differences being that the fists are not removed but become the headlights, and instead of flipping backwards inside the chest, Diablock Convoy's noggin flips forwards with the aid of sideways-opening windows, akin to Masterpiece Prime. A "laser rifle" in the shape of his ion cannon can be built from black bricks, and stickers bearing the Autobot faction symbol can be placed on Diablock Convoy's shoulders, although this is not recommended as it is designed to permanently stick to multiple tiles which dislodge easily and may damage the sticker.
Four million years ago, Cybertron, shaken from its orbit and drifting through space, became threatened when it floated into the path of an asteroid field. Prime led a group of elite Autobot warriors on the Ark, the Autobot starship, on a mission to destroy the asteroids. Although the mission was successful, during the aftermath of this mission, the Ark was attacked by Decepticons hoping to overpower their weakened foes. Intent on keeping the secrets of the Ark from the Decepticons, Prime set the craft on a suicide course, crashing it into the then prehistoric planet Earth.

When I was a child in the 1960s, I bought most of my own Lego, using money from paper routes I had from the ages of 7-16. But the items I bought we not ‘kits’. They were small boxes of standard bricks. Each box contained only a single shape and colour, but you could find most of the basic shapes 1×1 or 1×2 or 1×4 or 1×8, 2×2 or 2×3 or 2×4, bevels, doors or windows, if you found the right box. The boxes were only 50 cents, and had an average of 12 bricks per box. That works out out to about 4-5 cents per brick. The kits were expensive, but buying the standard boxes was a lot cheaper, and that is what most people did back then. With my paper route, at the age of 7 I could buy 100 pieces per week using my own money. Name any 7 year old that afford to do that now!
Hot Rod first appeared in the American animated series during the events of The Transformers: The Movie (as a main protagonist), where he was one of the many Autobots stationed at Autobot City.[5] He was first seen fishing with Daniel Witwicky. When Daniel saw the shuttle that was going to make a supply run to Autobot City, he told Hot Rod and together they both went to an observation point, only to see a hole in the shuttle. The ship had been previously hijacked by Decepticon forces led by Megatron, with its crew killed.

Hasbro executives, high off the revival of G.I. Joe through the same marketing concept, decided to acquire rights to toys from a variety of Japanese “Super Robot” series. Transformers didn't introduce the concept of super robots to the United States, but for the first time, the genre became widely recognized and popular outside of Japan. As the Transformers brand grew throughout G1, it began to define the genre, and all other super robots were measured competitively to Transformers' standard.
Available exclusively from Japanese clothing company A Bathing Ape in April 2012, "Convoy Reissue BAPE Ver. BLACK" (コンボイ復刻版 BAPE® Ver. BLACK) is a redeco of the original Optimus Prime toy sporting a unique new grey color scheme, along with a grey trailer decorated with a camouflage pattern. Both trailer and Prime himself feature the A Bathing Ape logo in place of an Autobot symbol, while the floor of the trailer's Combat Deck mode features new Bathing Ape-themed labels. The figure comes in a recolored version of the original Japanese packaging.
Ralston marketed many breakfast cereals based on cartoons in the 80s and 90s. One of these was Transformers. The Transformers Chocolate Flavored Cereal was a chocolate-flavored concoction, not unlike Cocoa Puffs, manufactured by the Ralston Corporation. However, the cereal was sold only in some parts of the United States and was short lived. The cereal box had Optimus Prime on its cover. The box claims the cereal had "more taste than meets the eye" and also had the ability to "transform ordinary milk into chocolate flavored milk". There also was a mail-away offer for a Jazz toy. The few boxes that still exist are collectables,[5] (one of which went for $349 on eBay).
This figure was designed by Yūki Ōshima and produced by KT Figure Collection. The figure is actually a mini bust of Optimus Prime, which includes the head and the upper body without arms. The chest design comes with translucent blue windows and a grill on the midsection. There is also a button in the back. Pushing the button will open the chest and cause the Matrix to emerge, similar to the scene in The Transformers: The Movie.
Optimus had Bumblebee and Huffer plant false information to mislead the Decepticons. As the Autobots were in need of a new power source, he sent Cliffjumper to find Doctor Heath Blaisedale and had to apologize to the doctor after Cliffjumper kidnapped her. Persuading her to help them, the Autobots traveled to the solar plant to make use of her solar reactor, only to find the Decepticons were already planning to attack it. While the other Autobots re-energized, Optimus protected them from an attack by Starscream, Thundercracker and Skywarp. Ravage abducted Blaisedale as a diversion, forcing Optimus to lead a team and rescue her. When the team returned, the plant was already under attack and Optimus helped the Dinobots drive them off. Unfortunately the Dinobots totaled the plant in the process, and Optimus promised Blaisedale the Autobots would help her rebuild. In return, Blaisedale organized a meeting with the President of the United States so the Autobots could forge an alliance. Sun Raid (Listen 'n Fun)
As a result of striving for vehicle realism and painstaking accuracy to his visual portrayal in the live-action films, this Optimus Prime ends up being ridiculously complex. Transforming him back into a truck is probably more complicated than shown in the movie and can only be considered torture. Very unfortunately, the instructions for this toy are infamous for being amazingly vague and unclear in their visual depiction of the transformation steps, making transformation even harder. Also, let us not forget that, upon transforming him back to robot mode, he will declare his identity over and over and over and over and over until you're finished.
4. Collectability/Internet/Ebay: While Lego has always been a somewhat collectible product, the age of the internet has increased the collectability of Lego. Nostalgic adults came together on the internet to trackdown and re-acquire sets from their child hood. I think Lego has embraced this as evidenced by large limited edition sets aimed at the adult market. This is also evident in the increase in tempo of development of sets and themes that drive the collector to want to buy more and more; which overall is good for Lego. In the past, an individual set and theme seemed to have more life than they do now.

Reissued in 2003 as part of Takara's Transformers Collection line of reissues. This version (#13 in the Collection series) was retooled from the 2000/2002 Rodimus Major tooling in order to make the fists and engine block hole wide enough to equip Firebolt. In addition, the original 2 guns had their posts modified so that a Targetmaster Hot Rod could still use them, if the owner chose to.


In time-honored tradition, Prime's instructions depict the toy with an alternate "pretooled" head – in this case, a version with the faceplate deployed, used on the Platinum Edition and "Rusty" releases of the figure (see below). Additionally, his packaging stock photography depicts him with extra white/silver paint details, especially on his chest and wheel rims, as well as having gray upper arms with red details, among other differences.
As seen in the episode "War Dawn", Optimus Prime began his life as a robot named Orion Pax, a mostly defenseless dock worker during the Golden Age of Cybertron nine million years ago, with a girlfriend named Ariel and a best friend named Dion. During this time, a new breed of robot with new flight capabilities appeared on the planet that Orion idolized. When Megatron, the leader of the new group of robots, approached him with inquiries about using one of the dock warehouses, Orion was swayed by Megatron. Both Orion and Ariel were severely wounded when Megatron and his forces attacked in order to claim the energy stored there. Searching for someone to help them, the time-displaced Aerialbots took Orion and Ariel to the ancient Autobot, Alpha Trion, who used them as the first subjects for the new reconstruction process he had developed involving rebuilding the frail Autobot frames into more battle-hardy configurations. With this reconstruction, Orion Pax became Optimus Prime, the first of the Autobot warriors.

Two custom-made pieces (presented in robot and vehicle mode) by the Hasbro Transformers team as the grand prize for G4TV and Jumpcut's contest for fans to remix selected Transformers clips. Won by TFW2005.com member James Zahn, this one-of-a-kind (well, two-of-a-kind) piece is an almost fully vacuum-metallized Leader-class Optimus Prime in red, silver and blue (based heavily upon Generation 1 Optimus Prime), presented with a custom display base with an embossed silver Autobot insignia and a perspex display case.
 This is an arbitrary line but it is a line that needed to be drawn. There have been many promotional sets over the years which have very few pieces but carry a higher price because of their promotional status. These can range from keychains to individual minifigs to seasonal items. They are not representative of the typical price of a LEGO brick and therefore should not be included in the evaluation.
If Optimus destroyed the duplicate Cosmos, the real one would inform the Autobots of the Decepticons’ schemes, and the convoy would roll out to take on their adversaries. They were soon met by a squad of flying Decepticons, but were at a strict disadvantage against their adversaries as their vehicle modes possessed no weapons. The Autobots nonetheless managed to fight their way to the Decepticons’ base, one way or another, and defeated the Decepticons by using their own gravity weapon against them. Desert Flight
Eleven years after their arrival on Earth, Prime and the Autobots made a new human ally in Wataru Hoshinoumi when he stumbled into the midst of a battle between Prime's team and Starscream and Ramjet. Enter! The Transformers When Megatron joined the fight soon after, he held Bumblebee and Wataru hostage, daring Prime to make a move against him. Prime opened fire, but Megatron merely used the defeated Starscream for a shield, then turned his cannon on the younger duo. Prime unleashed his ion blaster and apparently deflected the blast with a shot of his own, saving Bumblebee and Wataru and prompting the Decepticons to retreat. The Emperor of Destruction Appears!
A Japanese TV Magazine exclusive, this release of the Super-Con class Prime toy has almost all of his parts cast in translucent coloured plastics—hence the 'crystal' moniker—representing the character's disembodied spark after his destruction in the Armada cartoon episode "Crisis" and resurrection in "Miracle". What that means for poor Over-Run (or "Surge" in Japan), also cast in translucent plastic, we couldn't say! Available via mail-order, only 5000 pieces were distributed in October of 2003.
Another version of Prime was also available in the second wave of the Smallest Transforming Transformers series as a chase figure. This almost entirely white version of the figure is clearly based on the version of the original Prime cab robot used in the Generation 1 Ultra Magnus figure, but was nonetheless sold as Optimus Prime for the Smallest line.

"Garbage Truck" is a redeco of the same Optimus Prime toy in blue and white, a common coloration for Japanese garbage trucks that bears ends up bearing a coincidental resemblance to the Bot Shots Polar Assault Team Optimus. His stickers now picture his truck mode being loaded with garbage, his truck mode driving around, and the word "cleaning" in both English and Japanese.
Get ready to turn heads with TRANSFORMERS MIGHTY MUGGS Figures. Call it a moodswing, or call it a moodSPIN, these TRANSFORMERS MIGHTY MUGGS figures feature a push-and-turn mechanism that lets fans change the figure’s facial expression by pushing down on the head. With 3 different expressions and classic character designs, these figures will have fans doing a triple take. Characters include BUMBLEBEE, OPTIMUS PRIME, MEGATRON and more. Each sold separately. Available at most major retailers and on HasbroToyShop.com.
Doug Smidebush, Lior Keinan , Kelvin Nduka, Thad Standley, Nolan Zak, Adam Franks, Stephen Brown, Loren Roberts, Matt and Nykki Boersma, Tom Morgan, Jack Everitt, John Kovalic, Seiler Hagan, Jess Hart, Will James, Christopher M. Kelly, Roberto L. Vargas, Michele Hall, Chuck Lawton, Ismael Schonhorst, (There are those who call him) Tim, Vladimir Weinstein, Randiman Rogers, Robert Booth, Henry Roenke, Kevin Culp, W. David MacKenzie, Nicholas Richards, John Idlor, Michael Fox, Rob H., Matthew Cody, Dan Callahan, Patrick Kohn, Seth Phillips, Kevin Korpi, Ben MS, Monica, Mark Gonyea, Pharlain Ross, Derick Larson, Furstarter.com
In order to come to some sort of conclusion about the price of LEGO, I needed to get some data on the historic retail prices of LEGO sets. The best source of this information is brickset.com. This website has data on almost all LEGO sets ever made and the retail pricing for many of them. I wrote a web scraping program to go through the Brickset database and make a database of set information. In order to keep the results relevant, I decided to compile one set that fit two basic qualifications:
Summer of 2017 will bring us the fifth Transformers movie, The Last Knight. It’s said that it will be a little different from the previous films; an entry point for new viewers that will help launch a series of spinoffs or stand-alone movies. And the first of those spinoffs is a Bumblebee movie, slated for release in the summer of 2018. At one point, Michael Bay said he would love to make an R-rated, Quentin Tarantino-style movie featuring Bee, but that’s not likely to come to fruition, considering how much kids love the character.
The subject of Bumblebee’s voice is a bit of a complicated matter. Just as he was the second Transformer ever seen on the original TV show, he was also the second to speak and did so in the loud and clear voice of Dan Gilvezan, who voiced him throughout the original series and animated movie. But by the time we get to the first live-action movie, he could only talk via audio clips because, according to a prequel comic, Megatron had destroyed his voice capacitor during a battle on Cybertron.
As this is the Unicron Triogy we're talking about, it should come as no surprise that Prime can transform into a Super Mode by combining with his trailer, which becomes a massive winged backpack and a pair of large boots, generally evocative of God Ginrai. To complete his Super Mode look, a small lever of the back of Prime's head raises his traditional mouthplate into place, covering his Optimus Primal-style mouth slot, and two "crests" fold out from either side of his helmet. Hasbro's instructions and stock photography for the figure orient the wings so that the two cannons point over Prime's shoulders, but Takara's have wings arcing up past his shoulders, with the cannons slung under his arms. This was the way Prime appeared in the cartoon series, and was the way all subsequent Hasbro redecos of the toy were positioned. In Super Mode, Prime is a rather top-heavy robot, and his hip joints are not that tight, which makes standing him up a challenging prospect.

This increase in average piece count could be a factor in why LEGO is perceived to be more expensive now than in the past. LEGO sets have become larger and more complex. They have started to market directly to an older crowd with sets such as the Modular Buildings and the Architecture series. These new sets have rekindled interest in LEGO for an older generation but at the same time, it has introduced this same generation to the relatively high price of LEGO sets.
Although MechTech Optimus Prime's deco is similar to the first Deluxe Class figure, some of his parts (robot shoulder flaps, chest piece/truck front) were recast in blue plastic (with the chest being painted red), and his paint applications on the pelvis, headlights & thighs are omitted. His front truck hood/backpack's deco is altered: the truck steps and the fenders were painted blue, and the gold sprays on the flame tampographs are removed, while he features additional flame tampos on both sides of his front hood, and an Autobot Insignia on his left robot shoulder. He still retains the light-piping gimmick, but cast in clear plastic, with the eyeballs being (halfheartedly) painted with clear blue. His MechTech weapon is cast in transparent orange plastic, with the exception of the scope/lever and the gun barrel, which remained opaque silver plastic due to being cast with unpaintable plastic. He also features Cyberglyphics on the left side of his vehicle mode front hood.
This series introduced the dangerous Predacon faction, robotic dragons and mythical creatures that posed a threat to Autobot and Decepticon alike. In response, the 'Bots and 'Cons don new armor (the Autobots in spiky, over-weaponized armor reminiscent of Mad Max, while the Decepticons take on more beastly traits) and are armed with new gimmick-laden launching/spinning weapons. On-package bios were reduced in length to just a sentence or two, and the instruction sheets instead feature facts about one of the figure's main weapons, as well as a chapter of the Tales of the Beast Hunters prose story.
The 1984 and 1985 toy lines contained several figures of note. Megatron, the Decepticon leader, originally transformed into a realistic Walther P38 pistol with stock and barrel extensions and scope. The Megatron toy was delayed till 1985 for release in the UK. The Constructicons were the first "gestalt" team in the Transformers line, but were different from most subsequent gestalt teams in that they consisted of six members instead of five. The Autobot Jetfire was repainted from a Macross toy, specifically the VF-1 Valkyrie, and the character was renamed Skyfire in the animated television series program for copyright reasons.

A redeco of Cybertronian Optimus Prime with a translucent red front section, additional (painted) "scratched paint" details, some red paint highlights either omitted or changed to yellow and additional yellow circuitry pattern detailing reminiscent of the jammed abilities/mode lock/EMP effect from the War for Cybertron game, available in a Toys"R"Us-exclusive three-pack with redecos of Cybertronian Megatron and Cybertronian Bumblebee.


Classics Optimus Prime was initially intended to be Deluxe-sized. An alleged list of the tentative Classics line-up[20] included a Deluxe-sized Optimus Prime without a trailer and a version with a trailer at the Voyager price point; however, it appears the decision was eventually made to upscale Optimus to Voyager size instead.[21] Don Figueroa's control drawings for the Deluxe version were leaked before the Classics line was even released at retail.[22] A gray model prototype was later shown as part of an interview with TakaraTomy's staff in Transformers Generations 2009 vol. 1.[23] It's unclear whether the trailer ever made it past the early planning stage before the size of the figure was changed.

In another possible sequence of events, the trio returned to Autobot headquarters to relate their findings to Optimus Prime. The Decepticons planned to use a Destruction Beam to create a fault line near Center City, which would in turn be exploited by Rumble’s earthquake-inducing abilities to destroy the entire area. The Autobots then decided to split up in two groups, one to attack the Decepticons’ fortress, the other to stop Rumble in Center City. Optimus headed the lead team.
Released in the first wave of the Authentics toyline, "Autobot Optimus Prime" is a new mold the size of a 2015 Robots in Disguise Battle Pack toy. He changes from an evergreen-inspired robot into a more G1-based truck in just four steps. His instructions are incorrect; for truck mode, his legs must be folded in before the arms, otherwise the locking tabs on the arms will get in the way. Due to his transformation, he ends up with no elbows and a fake chest. He also has problems standing up due to hollow legs.

Activision and Traveller's Tales, creators of the Lego Star Wars games, released Transformers: The Game in 2007, accompanied by Transformers Autobots and Transformers Decepticons, to tie in with the live-action feature film for the Sony PlayStation 3, Microsoft Xbox 360, Nintendo Wii, Nintendo DS, PC, Sony PlayStation Portable, and PlayStation 2. The player was able to play as both the Autobots and the Decepticons, pick up and throw objects, and transform at any time. The steering in vehicle mode was compared to that of the Grand Theft Auto games and had a free-roaming environment.
With the failure of the Generation 2 series, Hasbro and Takara decided the franchise needed an overhaul. They went in a new direction and a new beginning. While there had been Transformers that change into robotic animals, the premise of the new line was that all figures would transform into animals with realistic appearances. The Beast Wars toy line was launched in the autumn of 1995, and Mainframe Entertainment produced a computer-generated imagery, or CGI, animated series program to tie in with the new toy line. A fresh idea coupled with a TV series program with strong stories assured this series the success Hasbro and Takara needed, as this series was a giant hit in international markets as well as in Takara's home market, Japan.
Aside from the Powermaster feature itself, the main gimmick of the toy is the ability of the truck cab to combine with the trailer to form the larger "Super Optimus Prime" figure. This is essentially accomplished by standing the trailer up, folding the cab in half and inserting it into the empty cavity in the trailer's torso, forming an imposing—if almost entirely unposeable—robot form armed with all four weapons. The head of this super robot form is a separate piece which can be stored in the rear of Prime's trailer when not in use. While Hi-Q was always shown plugged into Prime's chest in artwork of this mode (as seen in the picture here), this was actually entirely unnecessary as transforming into Super Optimus Prime didn't require the standard Prime toy's legs to be unlocked.
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