Part of the fourth wave of Prime: Beast Hunters Cyberverse Commander Class toys, Beast Blade Optimus Prime is a jungle-themed green and blue redeco of his Series 3 Cyberverse Commander Class toy, coming with a new Battlewing Shield accessory in addition to retaining both the Thunder Lance and Star Saber. His shield can open up to form wings, and can be pegged onto the ridge on top of the vehicle's cage compartment, or mount onto the screw-hole on his, er, robot butt.
In the Autobot Campaign, Optimus Prime provides intelligence and missions to Bumblebee in his search for the Allspark. Eventually, the clues lead the Autobot to Sam Witwicky. After saving Sam from Barricade, Bumblebee finally completes preparations for the Autobots to arrive on Earth. Once on Earth and having informed the two teenagers of their mission, Prime and the Autobots are discovered by Sector 7. Optimus sends Jazz on a high-speed destruction distraction mission, then sends Ironhide to rescue Jazz from a double-threat posed by the government agents and various Decepticon scouts. When Bumblebee is captured, Prime transforms and chases the chopper which from which the small Autobot is tied. After a lengthy chase, Prime manages to catch the net, only to be thrown off by another Cybertronian meteor. As Bumblebee is carried away, Optimus promises he will not fail him again. Jazz informs him that the meteor is not an Autobot. Prime confronts the new threat, who turns out to be the Decepticon Triple Changer Shockwave. The two battle it out across Tranquility before Optimus finally destroys him. During the battle, Optimus overhears Starscream's transmission revealing the location of the Allspark. Optimus then returns to an intel role as he guides Bumblebee in his mission to retrieve the Allspark from Hoover Dam. Unfortunately, the Decepticons manage to free Megatron, leading to the final battle in Mission City. As the Autobots battle it out with the Decepticons to protect Sam and the Allspark, things seem to take a turn for the worse as Megatron finally arrives. Before he can claim the Allspark, Optimus attacks him. Optimus defeats Megatron and leaves him on the ground, seemingly devoid of life. However, just as Sam is giving the Allspark to Optimus, Megatron awakens, leaping at Optimus with his chain-flail out, making one last attempt at defeating his adversary. Optimus grabs the chain, pulling Megatron in closer, and, with the Allspark clutched in his fist, delivers a punch through Megatron's spark, killing him. Optimus reflects on the losses and rewards of this battle, as the Autobots have a new home, but many were killed in the battle. The story ends with Optimus and the Autobots choosing to remain in Earth, proclaiming it as their new home.

We're sure we're not telling you anything you don't already know when we say that Hot Wheels are miniature die-cast cars with dynamic multi axular momentum technology (ie, they roll). They are usually based on real-life production cars but sometimes are modeled after bad acid trips, with wheels added later (for the rolling). Shortly after the introduction of the cars, Mattel launched various tracks to take full advantage of the cars' rollability.


The internet can be blamed for the size and scope of the secondary LEGO market. On the website, BrickLink, you can find almost any set that LEGO has ever produced. In addition, the site keeps records of trends in the market and value of individual pieces. This site is invaluable to a LEGO collector and has given many the ability to grow their collections. Before the advent of this site and sites like eBay, collecting LEGO required going to garage sales. There are now whole sites dedicated to buying LEGO as an investment, but that is a topic for another article.

A special edition Bearbrick released in celebration of the Transformers 30th anniversary, Optimus Prime is a redeco of Bearbrick G1 Optimus Prime in a deco based on his Age of Extinction appearance. He transforms from a Bearbrick painted up like himself to a bear-eared robot and comes with no accessories, but holes in his robot mode hands can accommodate other toys' weapons.

During the promotion of the Transformers films, Optimus Prime appeared in several commercials. Optimus Prime, along with other Transformers, were featured in several commercials for General Motors. Scenes with Optimus Prime were used in several General Motors commercials.[48] A commercial for the Discovery Channel featured Optimus Prime singing part of a promotional song.[49]

The details between these events differ between universes. Sometimes Optimus Prime merged with Vector Sigma soon after defeating the Hate Plague, and returned much, much later as Star Convoy. Sometimes Optimus Prime partnered up with Marissa Faireborn to receive upgrades through mutual kissing. Sometimes... look, he did a lot of weird stuff, okay? He later sacrifices himself to restore the Matrix of Leadership.

The main Prime line in Japan, while mostly using the same molds, was quite a bit different from the Hasbro version. Hoping to snag a slightly-older market, the toys were given a bit of "model kit" vibe. Paint operations were reduced and replaced with old-fashioned sticker sheets, so you had to customize/complete the toy itself... and then there was the blatantly model-kit Arms Microns packed in with every toy.
This version of Leader-class Optimus Prime features a new lower face sculpt that lacks a faceplate, as well as the replacement of his fuel tank/exhaust assemblies with new, transforming versions that can combine into his ion blaster/barrage cannon. To the simultaneous pleasure and displeasure of people who had already purchased the first release of Leader-class Revenge of the Fallen Optimus Prime, Buster Optimus Prime features an extensive paint job that closely matches Prime's appearance on the big screen, including covering almost all of his grey plastic with silver paint or chrome, expanding and outlining all of the flame tampographs white for greater accuracy to ILM's computer model, and generally painting in small details, nooks and crannies that were neglected on the first release due to cost-cutting reasons. The red and blue plastic colors also vary from the original release, to better match his film appearance.
There is one aspect not looked at in the price and that is the shift to model building vs. creation leading to a change in the utility of the pieces. I seem to need many more sets to get a useful variety of pieces these days as many of the sets contain a lot of pieces that are very specific to the needs of the set and are less useful when one wants to create their own designs. It would be a fascinating addition to rate each of the block types on its utility, perhaps by its prevalence in other sets, and then assess each set on its total utility score. So then the question is how many sets would you need to by to achieve different levels of utility and how has this changed over time.

As the number of sets released has increased, the harder it has been for stores to parcel out their shelving space. In order to make more sales, decisions have to be made as to which sets will be carried. Not every store can carry the whole product line (not even all official LEGO stores carry the whole product line). This process will favor the sets that drive sales the most, such as the licensed sets. The traditional boxes of bricks are pushed out of the way for the more profitable lines.
Part of the new Adventure Shokugan series, this Optimus Prime is a transformable snap-fit kit molded in red, blue, and yellow plastic with detailing from stickers. The kit's transformation engineering is borrowed from the Warrior class figure. But unlike the said toy, the Axe must be pegged onto Prime's legs before transforming, and his shoulders are molded on his front truck halves/shoulders not being flipped down. Also, the stickers are used to cover the molded cavity on the front shoulders. As with Fixit & Underbite, Optimus Prime is fully transformable.
Released alongside a Sega Mega Drive version of Megatron and outside of any other toyline, "Optimus Prime featuring Original PlayStation" transforms from robot to a scaled-down non-functional Sony PlayStation video game console. He features an opening disc compartment and comes with two accessories, a memory card and a controller that splits in two and attaches to his lower arms to act as blasters.
Created with the specific purpose of producing an Optimus Prime as accurate to the original animated series as possible, the toy is exceptionally poseable, partially constructed from die-cast metal, features rubber tires and vacuum-metalized plastic and is heavily detailed, with sliding pistons in its joints and working spring-loaded suspension in vehicle mode. The figure also contains multiple non-intrusive gimmicks, such as a moving mouthplate to emulate Prime's traditional method of speech, flip-up communications panels on the forearms depicting images of Bumblebee and Starscream, and an opening, light-up Matrix chamber in the chest, which contains a removable vacuum-metalized Matrix of Leadership that can also be pulled open.
In 1984, a volcanic eruption re-activated the Ark, which, in turn, brought the Transformers back on-line. Prime led the Autobots in their opening battles to prevent the Decepticons from plundering Earth's resources, but, following their initial victory, the Transformers were all deactivated by Shockwave. Shockwave killed Prime and leeched the energy of the Creation Matrix from his mind. He used this energy to give life to his creations, the Constructicons. Shockwave was unaware that the Matrix was not just a program in Prime's mind, but a physical object in his chest. Before Shockwave could give life to Jetfire, his next Decepticon, Prime transferred the Matrix energy into the mind of Buster Witwicky. Buster used the energy to turn Jetfire on Shockwave, allowing Prime to reclaim his body and retake leadership of the Autobots. As a reward, he gave Jetfire true life.
Thanks to fellow Seibertron user, Sabrblade, we have discovered some new in-hand pictures of the forthcoming Transformers Studio Series #38 Voyager Class Transformers Bumblebee Optimus Prime figure! These come couresty of YouTuber TonTon Reviews, presumably as a preview of his next review. For comparison, they have put this new entry into the Studio Series with MP-10 and Takara Tomy's Movie Advanced series "Classics Optimus Prime" (Evasion Mode Optimus Prime). This gives us a good - Read More
Like the original figure, Powermaster Prime is composed of two major components: his truck cab, which transforms into Prime himself, and his trailer, which is essentially a heavily-armed version of the original. The trailer has a fold-down ramp to allow the storage of a smaller Transformer, or perhaps spare accessories. The trailer transforms into a battle station armed with two long black rifles and two grey double-barreled cannons (featuring seating for Powermaster engine figures), all of which Optimus Prime can also wield in his fists.

Forming a roughly 11-inch figure when fully assembled, Diablock Convoy is highly articulated, using 12 ball-jointed block pieces, giving him a range of motion similar to Masterpiece Prime, with the exception of the head, which can only move up and down, not side-to side. Speaking of the head, it is by far the most stylised aspect of the figure, with no real attempt to approximate Prime's face or mouthplate inside a simplified helmet, mainly featuring only a reversed block that gives the odd impression of a cycloptic eye. It is possibly intended to actually represent his forehead grill, as a yellow block inside his head construction remains barely-visible through a slit in his face, possibly intended to represent the classic toy's yellow eyes.


Later, at the peace celebration, Prime was watching a procession of Autobots when Decepticons attacked. Optimus ordered Omega Supreme into action but the huge Autobot was quickly overcome by Menasor, Piranacon and Predaking. The Art of War #3 Prime hopped into the fray, saved a civilian from getting smushed by the falling Omega, rode Sixshot into Piranacon's face, smashed Astrotrain into the ground, and carried a wounded civilian out of danger.

Designated "Optimus Prime" rather than the traditional Japanese "Convoy", this figure is a redeco of the previous Music Label Convoy figure into the character's traditional red, blue and silver color scheme. Unlike previous re-issues of the mold, iPod Optimus Prime's sports a paint application similar to KissPlayers Convoy, having its ABS/PVC parts painted over with a thin layer of his iconic red, white (silver if you will) and blue motif paint applications (with the exception of his iPod docking trailer). This includes his trailer, though the effect is somewhat marred by the large, visible gap on one side. When reconfigured into dock mode, the interior surfaces surrounding the speakers are decorated with black-on-silver techno-patterns as well as three "Optimus Prime" logos. The recessed space also features a stylised, almost Frank Milleresque, high-contrast portrait of Prime's face, although this is largely covered when an iPod is inserted. The figure comes in identical packaging to the original Music Label Convoy, save for the addition of a sticker illustrating the different color of its contents.
Fire Blast Optimus Prime is a redeco of the previously released Power Hook Optimus Prime fast action battler. The color scheme is loosely based upon Generation One Rodimus Prime, explained rather oddly in the card bio as being the camouflage Optimus took while hunting Decepticons on Mars post-movie. ...Because there are so many longnose cabs driving around Mars. Yeah.
Being a brand new and intricate remake of the Autobot leader, MP-10 was used as the gold standard in terms of scale for future Masterpiece figures, with all the upcoming releases being sized to best match him. Much like his older incarnation, he was also cherished by collectors, generating heated debates on which version is the best one up to this day.[5]
For its release in Korea, Hasbro Asia provided a collector coin featuring truck-mode Optimus Prime on one side and "MP-01L" on the other. The coin came mounted on a card featuring lineart of the Autobot leader's head, the stark black design of which could be mistaken for promoting the earlier "Sleep Mode" release. The limited release (and general lack of enthusiasm for the collector coins in Korea) makes this one of the more difficult Masterpiece coins to find.
Nonetheless, I remain a big fan of Lego and although I think they have somewhat moved away from their roots with the excess of licensed products (and the earlier licensed products were, in my opinion, not very good because they contained too many specialized non-generic pieces that weren’t useful for generic building. But that situation is improved and in particular we have found the Star Wars sets to be of most value for generic building, because they generally have very few really specialized pieces (although to be fair the sets are most useful for building other spaceships, etc).
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