This redeco of the Dark of the Moon Voyager Class Optimus Prime figure features a really unusual deco pattern consisting of red transparent tires, the vehicle front grill and fuel tanks (the fenders remained opaque red due to unpaintable plastic). Some of his parts like the vehicle front hood and the truck roof features a pattern similar to the ones used for the Tech Specs in the Generation 1 toys. He features a new sword and shield accessory, which can be used to decode the patterns.
Like several new-mold Revenge of the Fallen toys, Optimus Prime suffers from some cost-cutting measures that affected the final production version of the mold. According to Hasbro's stock photos/back-of-box photo of the hand-painted prototype, the toolboxes on the sides of his legs were designed to fold away further for a sleeker, cleaner look. Additionally, the rear tires would have been able to split in half, with the inner half of the tire going inside the outer half to recreate the thin tires seen on Prime's CG design. Some articulation was lost on the toy between Hasbro stock photography and the final release. His fingers are no longer articulated; instead, the entire hand is now one molded piece. Finally, the lower arms appear to have been originally designed so that his hands could slide in or out of them during transformation. Sadly, he also lacks rubber tires, which the original movie Prime did have. Meanwhile, the articulated fingers was later used for the Asia Premium Series & Movie The Best releases.
Optimus Prime is another redeco of Revenge of the Fallen Legends Class Optimus Prime, features gunmetal-stque grey plastic, and his paint operations being similar to the first Revenge of the Fallen Legends Class toy. He is also packaged with Grimlock, himself a redeco of none other than Energon Cruellock. Like other Legion-themed product, he is exclusive to Walmart in the US and Asda in the UK.
Forming a roughly 11-inch figure when fully assembled, Diablock Convoy is highly articulated, using 12 ball-jointed block pieces, giving him a range of motion similar to Masterpiece Prime, with the exception of the head, which can only move up and down, not side-to side. Speaking of the head, it is by far the most stylised aspect of the figure, with no real attempt to approximate Prime's face or mouthplate inside a simplified helmet, mainly featuring only a reversed block that gives the odd impression of a cycloptic eye. It is possibly intended to actually represent his forehead grill, as a yellow block inside his head construction remains barely-visible through a slit in his face, possibly intended to represent the classic toy's yellow eyes.

This Classics Optimus Prime is a smaller, deluxe-class toy bearing a greater resemblance to the original G1 toy. He was only available in a special Versus pack with a similarly unique Classics Megatron toy and later the FAB version of the 2007 movie Prime. Later releases of this toy had him individually packed in some European countries. His vehicle mode and robot mode is based upon the original toy, but due to limitations in design, budget and gimmick, does not succeed very well. His thighs cannot collapse into his lower legs, meaning they are exposed in vehicle mode, as is his head. Although to be fair, you wouldn't really notice the leg thing if he had a trailer. But, he is greatly articulated.
Classics Optimus Prime was initially intended to be Deluxe-sized. An alleged list of the tentative Classics line-up[20] included a Deluxe-sized Optimus Prime without a trailer and a version with a trailer at the Voyager price point; however, it appears the decision was eventually made to upscale Optimus to Voyager size instead.[21] Don Figueroa's control drawings for the Deluxe version were leaked before the Classics line was even released at retail.[22] A gray model prototype was later shown as part of an interview with TakaraTomy's staff in Transformers Generations 2009 vol. 1.[23] It's unclear whether the trailer ever made it past the early planning stage before the size of the figure was changed.
Hasbro's original plan for the Beast Wars was to have Optimus Prime, renamed Optimus Primal, and Megatron be reformatted versions of their 1980s selves. This was shown in the toys's Tech Specs, and in the comic packaged with the basic Optimus Primal/Megatron two-pack. Hasbro also wanted the "Mutant Heads" found on all of the deluxe sized first year toys as battle helmets, but Mainframe scrapped the idea as it would have required three animation models for each character instead of two. Another designed feature for the 1995/1996 toys was carried over from Generation 2, transparent "light pipe" eyes. However, most toys had those parts cast in opaque plastic.
Only available at ToysЯUs, this Optimus Prime is a redeco of the Classics figure. He features a cartoon/toy accurate deco on his truck/robot parts, and vacuum-metallized upper legs & front grille to evoke his original Generation 1 toy. Like every Classics Optimus Prime mold, he still features all of his accessories. This Optimus was packaged along with the redecoed Age of Extinction Optimus Prime.
In Transformers: Alliance, Optimus Prime and the Autobots aid the human soldiers after the battle in Mission City and destroy the Allspark-powered machines that were created. A trailer is obtained for Optimus Prime to carry the remains of Jazz. The Autobots leave Mission City as the Sector 7 personnel arrive to claim the remains of the Decepticons. About a month later, Epps and Lennox contact Optimus Prime about aiding them in escorting the remains of the Decepticons to the naval yard. They are spied on by Barricade, who transmitts the information to Starscream.
This increase in average piece count could be a factor in why LEGO is perceived to be more expensive now than in the past. LEGO sets have become larger and more complex. They have started to market directly to an older crowd with sets such as the Modular Buildings and the Architecture series. These new sets have rekindled interest in LEGO for an older generation but at the same time, it has introduced this same generation to the relatively high price of LEGO sets.

This silver-chromed redeco of the Leader-class Optimus Prime figure first saw the light of day as a prize in a TV Magazine mail-in, offered alongside a gold chrome version of the same toy (see above). Both figures were later made available again as prizes in a second contest in the September 2005 issue of TV Magazine, together with "Galaxy Convoy Custom Color Version" (see below). Despite being offered in equal quantities in these contests, this silver version is apparently much harder to come by.


In the animated series, Optimus Prime was originally in the Autobot Academy and friends with Sentinel Prime and Elita One. When Elita is lost on a planet dominated by giant spider-like aliens, he blames himself for leaving her behind, where she supposedly dies in the explosion of a wrecked Decepticon warship loaded with Energon. Sentinel doesn't forgive him for losing her and Optimus takes full responsibly for Elita's demise. Ultra Magnus, who had high hopes for him, expels him and thus bars him from any position of the Elite Guard. However, Magnus pulls some strings so that Optimus could be captain of a strange Space Bridge repair crew composed of an old grumbler of a war vet named Ratchet, a fledgling Bumblebee, and his fellow cadet, Bulkhead. Optimus is given command of the starship Omega Supreme.
Part of the first wave of Generations: Combiner Wars Voyager Class toys, this is a bigger, bulkier incarnation of Optimus Prime with a striking resemblance to Ginrai. He comes with two blasters which he holds via 5mm post. One of the guns is based on his trademark Ion Blaster, and both weapons store on the back of his vehicle mode as a makeshift engine block. His torso mode has several details that appear to be influenced by Energon Optimus Prime's super mode, including the head, chest, and thighs. In particular, the chest details are modeled after the Spark of Combination. He also features two pair of fake windows on his robot and gestalt chest halves. The combiner head can be used as a robot mode head if you're feeling silly.
1.) MP 10 EVA. Its arguably the best mold of any figure, and that color scheme! 2.) MP 12 Lambor. My fav transformer aand my fav car as a kid, cant beat it. 3.) MP Grimlock. Robot mode just looks like be dominates the shelf, regardless of who be is next to. 4.) MP Exhaust, mostly bc of the novelty factor as he is a pain to get in the States, plus his back story is cool. If not for that, MP 11 Skywarp would take this spot. 5.) MP Soundwave w/ cassettes. Duh!
Hasbro's original plan for the Beast Wars was to have Optimus Prime, renamed Optimus Primal, and Megatron be reformatted versions of their 1980s selves. This was shown in the toys's Tech Specs, and in the comic packaged with the basic Optimus Primal/Megatron two-pack. Hasbro also wanted the "Mutant Heads" found on all of the deluxe sized first year toys as battle helmets, but Mainframe scrapped the idea as it would have required three animation models for each character instead of two. Another designed feature for the 1995/1996 toys was carried over from Generation 2, transparent "light pipe" eyes. However, most toys had those parts cast in opaque plastic.

The subject of Bumblebee’s voice is a bit of a complicated matter. Just as he was the second Transformer ever seen on the original TV show, he was also the second to speak and did so in the loud and clear voice of Dan Gilvezan, who voiced him throughout the original series and animated movie. But by the time we get to the first live-action movie, he could only talk via audio clips because, according to a prequel comic, Megatron had destroyed his voice capacitor during a battle on Cybertron.

This Cybertron spin pop consists of a generic handle with an Optimus Prime sticker, topped with a figurine of Prime through which the included lollipop slots. When the handle is squeezed, a manual gear mechanism spins both the figure and lollipop—no batteries necessary! The handle was also redecoed in orange for a Megatron spin pop, with a figure of the Decepticon leader on top.
He made it out of the building and ran into the real Sunstreaker, who blasted the 2 clones following Hot Rod. Sunstreaker ignored Hot Rod's warning about Scorponok's army and stormed into the building so Hot Rod painfully wired himself to send a distress signal. When Sunstreaker's real head was later disabled by Hunter, the Headmaster clones shut down, which Hot Rod explained to Grimlock. The group was surprised by the arrival of Shockwave, but Ultra Magnus had heard Hot Rod's distress call and was on his way to Earth. After Scorponok knocked out Sludge and Grimlock tended to him, the remaining Dynobots offered Hot Rod a lift aboard the Monsterbots' ship. He refused though, and made it back into Machination HQ to take care of something "personal". He eventually found Scorponok's real head. Hunter also showed up and let Hot Rod know how to disable it, but before he could do so, Scorponok grabbed him. Before Scorponok could crush Hot Rod's head, the Dynobots showed up and began to battle Scorponok. Hot Rod told Swoop which wires to sever, and he did just that, reducing Scorponok to a catatonic state. Ultra Magnus arrived took everyone back aboard his ship, which later docked with the Ark-32. Within 3 days, Hot Rod was fully repaired, with a new body form design.

Multiple reports suggest that the toy suffers from a design flaw, inferior plastic quality, or both: Due to his hands having peg-holes that are a bit too small to accommodate 5mm posts, they have a tendency to show stress marks on the inside after pegging his sword handle (or most other pegs) inside. Stress marks also tend to appear near his tiny hinged wrists. Fortunately, there have been no reports of the hands actually breaking on either location thus far.
If Cosmos radioed his findings to Optimus immediately, Optimus’s convoy moved in to investigate a nearby Decepticon base. En route, the Autobots passed near a human town, but began floating in mid-air before being able to reach it. Optimus quickly deduced that this phenomenon was caused by an anti-gravity beam, courtesy of the Decepticons. Worried about the nearby humans also being affected by the lapse in gravity, Optimus had to decide whether he would order his troops to stop and help the townspeople, or to continue forward and attack the Decepticon base.
Summer of 2017 will bring us the fifth Transformers movie, The Last Knight. It’s said that it will be a little different from the previous films; an entry point for new viewers that will help launch a series of spinoffs or stand-alone movies. And the first of those spinoffs is a Bumblebee movie, slated for release in the summer of 2018. At one point, Michael Bay said he would love to make an R-rated, Quentin Tarantino-style movie featuring Bee, but that’s not likely to come to fruition, considering how much kids love the character.
Two custom-made pieces (presented in robot and vehicle mode) by the Hasbro Transformers team as the grand prize for G4TV and Jumpcut's contest for fans to remix selected Transformers clips. Won by TFW2005.com member James Zahn, this one-of-a-kind (well, two-of-a-kind) piece is an almost fully vacuum-metallized Leader-class Optimus Prime in red, silver and blue (based heavily upon Generation 1 Optimus Prime), presented with a custom display base with an embossed silver Autobot insignia and a perspex display case.
1. Color diversity: Back in the 80s, most sets were comprised of a few basic colors; red, blue, yellow, white, gray, and black. It was much easier to acquire a “critical mass” of pieces in each color to start building one’s own creations in coherent color schemes. Space, Town, Castle sets all had the same basic colors. Today Lego uses a much wider array of colors in their sets. While this adds a lot of variety and visual appeal to today’s sets, this means that one has to buy a much larger number of sets (or scour bricklink) to get achieve a workable critical mass of pieces in each color. After buying some of the modern sets, I end up with a few dark-blue or lime-green pieces that I don’t really have enough to much with other than use as accent colors. They end up in my misc color bin in the event I decide to build the set they originally came with or sell them off on bricklink.
Transformers GT "GT-R Prime" is a heavy retool of Alternity Convoy, transforming into a 1:32 replica of the Motul Autech GT-R race car used by the Nismo team in the Super GT racing championship series. He retains the flip-out blasters of the Alternity toy and can also wield his new Impact Wrench Gun accessory (also called the "Optimus Rifle" on the Transformers GT website), a weapon based on the impact wrenches used in car repairs. Like all GT toys, Prime also comes with a GT Sister, poseable human figures themed after race queens, his partner being a lady named Misaki.
"But," we wondered, "How do you listen to music if you're constantly throwing this little robot?" The answer is wireless Bluetooth headphones. Here's a thought: When the music-listening technology that comes with today's yo-yos is cooler and more advanced than the music-listening technology that came with portable CD players in our day, the youth of today officially rescinds its right to ever complain about anything. Ever.
This release of the Japanese Super Ginrai version of the of Powermaster Optimus Prime was a Toys R Us Japan exclusive black repaint, made to represent the original Convoy/Optimus Prime equipped for a special mission. All of his red and blue plastics were changed to black, his clear blue windows were now tinted red, making his overall colour scheme very reminiscent of the now-familiar 'Black Convoy' colour schemes.
Part of the third wave of 2012-onwards Generations Legends Class toys, Thrilling 30 Optimus Prime is a new mold that is roughly the same size as a Cyberverse Commander Class toy. Both his truck and robot mode are based on his Don Figueroa-designed body from IDW's ongoing series, and features 5mm-compatible hands and roof. He comes with an Ion Blaster which has both 5mm and 3mm posts.
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He reappeared in the third crossover, where he apparently acted as Optimus Prime's right-hand man. Putting a team together to look for the missing team that had journeyed to Earth (who had been captured by Serpentor and the Decepticons), he would later lead the combined G.I. Joe/Autobot force that rescued Optimus Prime. In contrast to his usual "youthful rookie" portrayal here Hot Rod seems to be in a high command position, outranking Ultra Magnus, Prowl and Ironhide among others. However, by the fourth crossover Hot Rod is forced to wait on Cybertron under Magnus's command as Optimus Prime journeys to Earth.
Similar to the Activators toyline, One-Step Changer Optimus Prime features a spring-loaded transformation. He features swivel articulation in the head and both arms. He shares a similar (not identical) transformation with his fellow One-Step changer, Hound. Also, due to his transformation scheme, his shoulders can be pushed forward (the arms is pushed on the same time), which also allows him to wield a close ranged weapons with longer handles with both hands.
He’s continued to be lovable through many different continuities, all the way to the current live-action film series. But as much as you love him, there may be a few things you don’t know about him. So let’s take a look at some of his strange real-world facts, storyline goofiness, pop-culture tie-ins and even his relationship to Back to the Future.
Prime soon had other things to worry about, as Magnus arrived on Earth with the intention of taking the Matrix, which he believed was rightfully his, at all costs. Prime, who refused to fight back, was seriously injured by Magnus. Magnus tracked Optimus to a desert island, where he pretended to offer him the hand of friendship, only to attempt to absorb the Matrix for himself. During the struggle, the brothers combined into the form of Omega Prime, also known as the God Fire Convoy. Through this link, Magnus was also able to channel the power of the Matrix, which he used to supercharge the Autobot Brothers into newly colored forms. Prime went on to battle the Decepticons on many other occasions. Although Magnus remained a free agent, refusing to take orders from his brother, over time, his animosity dwindled, and he frequently helped the Autobots by combining with Prime to battle the Predacons and Decepticons. During the final battle with Megatron's new form, Galvatron, the two brothers finally reconciled. Together, they faced Galvatron at the Earth's core and defeated him once and for all.
Studio Series Optimus Prime is an all new Voyager Class mold that transforms from robot into a Peterbilt 379 semi-truck. He comes with a pair of Energon Swords, which can be mounted onto his arms or store on the back of his robot mode or truck mode. The figure combines engineering concepts from his Age of Extinction Voyager Class figure with techniques previously used on Prime: First Edition Optimus Prime. He also features a more subdued color scheme compared to other Optimus Prime figures. Like the rest of the Studio Series figures, the figure prioritizes robot mode scale and thus stands shorter than his Voyager Class wavemate Starscream. The CG renders depict him possessing long smokestacks, but the final product has them shortened... again. He also comes with a cardboard backdrop display depicting the climatic forest battle from Revenge of the Fallen.

 This is an arbitrary line but it is a line that needed to be drawn. There have been many promotional sets over the years which have very few pieces but carry a higher price because of their promotional status. These can range from keychains to individual minifigs to seasonal items. They are not representative of the typical price of a LEGO brick and therefore should not be included in the evaluation.
A limited edition of the Optimus Prime toy sold as a mail-away exclusive by PepsiCo was made available in North America in 1985. This version of the figure came with a small fold-out leaflet glued to the top-right of the packaging, which contained two Pepsi logo stickers for the buyer to attach to Prime, mid-way through the traditional silver-and-blue stripe on his trailer. Canada also got a version of this promotional figure, but with much larger stickers that were the full length and height of the trailer. This promotion would go on to serve as the inspiration for the Japanese character of Pepsi Convoy, who would in turn be released by Hasbro as a new "Pepsi Optimus Prime" in 2007.
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