Bumblebee seems to have finally settled on one mode for the film franchise: the Camaro. Chevrolet had actually stopped producing the Camaro in 2002, after having it in their stable since 1966. It wasn’t without controversy that Bay and company decided to make Bumblebee a Camaro for the first live-action film in 2007, but Chevrolet used the product placement opportunity to help relaunch the brand.

Produced to coincide with the 20th anniversary of The Transformers: The Movie and its release on DVD by Sony, this edition of Prime is a redeco of his 20th Anniversary figure. It replaces the original's metallic paint with flatter colors and does away with any and all vacuum-metalized plastic, as well as altering several other small details across the body, like the color of the lights on his feet and chest.


1· To calculate the average price per piece in a year, I took the price per piece of each set made that year, multiplied it by the number of pieces in the set and then averaged all the weighted prices. I used a weighted average because when we are looking at the price per piece we are essentially saying we could buy x number of pieces for y dollars. Larger sets tend to have a lower price per piece so in effect you could get more pieces at that lower price that year. Note: this was done using US retail price data from Brickset.
I agree with Aidan but would expand on his point. It’s not just that the sets seemed bigger; they were. As the relative complexity of sets has increased, so too has the piece count, but there has been an overall decline in the size of the models due to increased build complexity and a corresponding reduction in size of the pieces required to create such detail. The negative affect on perceived value in this is apparent, though I would argue, misguided when one considers the build quality and detail of new and recent sets.
I you can get an official reissue for around the same price, do it. I lucked out and got an opened but mint Encore for $50 last week but you'll be getting lucky that way. All Hasbro reissues have short smokestacks and long stacks are harder to get separate to swap out. Average price for a Japanese reissue is around $100 opened. If you are on a budget and the kid doens't care about slight issues, the $40 KO would be the better option.
A gold chrome remold of the 2007 movie Leader Class figure by Hasbro Hong Kong. Limited to 88 units, with only 10 released to the public at the 2008 Animation and Comic Show convention; all of which were sold only to the first 10 people to spend more than HK$3,000 at the Hasbro booth. Because the figure is permanently fixed to the trophy base, it is no longer transformable.[131]

If all four Autobots ventured together into the Decepticons’ lab, they first encountered Laserbeak, only to quickly dispatch him. Venturing further into the lab, the group soon spotted the antidote they were after, and sent Mirage to fetch it. Mirage returned with the beaker and news; he had heard Ramjet and Starscream talking about using a new poison to turn humans into mindless slaves.
A redeco of Legends Optimus Prime replacing his red plastic with more blue and silver, but sprucing things up a bit with red flame paint operations. Defender Optimus Prime (ディフェンダーオプティマスプライム) was only available in Japan as part of their Transformers Animated promotion in March 2010. It was given away for free to customers who purchased Animated merchandise at Edion, Bic Camera and Yodobashi Camera stores.
In Transformers: Autobots, Optimus Prime meets up with the other Autobots to give further commands to his troops. Create-A-Bot, the new rookie, is eager to help in the cause, but Optimus tells him to sit back while the other Autobots fight the Decepticons. Create-A-Bot finally defies orders and completes a mission against Optimus's council. After nearly getting himself and the other Autobots killed, Create-A-Bot apologizes to Optimus personally. Taking pity on the newcomer, Optimus lets him off with a stern warning, and they move out together to face Megatron, who has absorbed the power of the Allspark. Optimus fights Megatron, but Megatron gains the upper-hand. Optimus is on the verge of defeat when Create-A-Bot takes the Allspark and drives to Megatron's chest, weakening Megatron but mortally wounding himself in the process. Optimus fights Megatron again, defeating him. As Megatron is on the ground, he tells Optimus that if he kills him, the Allspark will be destroyed and Cybertron will never be restored. Optimus says to Megatron that he will do what he must do, then he raises his sword and kills Megatron, destroying the Allspark in the process. Create-A-Bot also dies, but not before telling Optimus his final request to make Earth the new home of the Autobots and to protect the humans. The game ends with Optimus sending a message to all surviving Autobots taking refuge among the stars.
Hot Rod is often portrayed as energetic, yet brash and headstrong, with an overwhelming self-confidence that borders on arrogance.[1] As Rodimus Prime, leader of the Autobots, he is significantly more mature, physically powerful and instilled with the wisdom of the previous holders of the Matrix of Leadership. In a reversal of his behavior as Hot Rod, Rodimus is plagued by lack of confidence in his role as Autobot commander and often doubts his own decisions, feeling both inferior to and in some ways living in the shadow of the previous leader of the Autobots, Optimus Prime.
Unlike the other Swordbot toys, Optimus Exprime's kabuto helmets form an integral part of one of his alternate modes. The kabuto helmet designed for use with his DaiGekisou combination forms the head of his dragon form, while the kabuto helmet designed for use with his DaiKenzan combination forms the "tail" of the same. He comes with two HUGE swords (with 5mm handles) which can be attached to several places on his kabuto helmets or either alternate form, held separately in his hands, or held both in the same hand (with one held in reverse-grip).
When Sideswipe was accused and convicted of destroying the Nova Suspension Bridge, Optimus was infuriated that one of his own Autobots could commit such a heinous act. Optimus was tasked to hunt down and deactivate Sideswipe, though the task proved to be easy as Sideswipe did not run, hide or resist. After Optimus had deactivated Sideswipe, he was approached by Prowl, who pointed out that Sideswipe's actions made little sense, as he had committed the crime in broad daylight before many witnesses. Agreeing that the Decepticons might be behind the situation, Optimus allowed Prowl to take a team of Autobots to Carob Island to clear Sideswipe's name while Optimus and Jazz stayed behind to continue working on human/Autobot relations. Prowl returned with evidence that it was indeed a Decepticon-controlled clone of Sideswipe that had committed the crime. Optimus then presumably reactivated Sideswipe when his name was cleared. Deadly Paradise
Hasbro has had a bit of a strange relationship with Bumblebee. In the early days (we’re talking mid-’80s) he was hugely popular, both on the TV show and as a toy, and Hasbro was sure to capitalize on that. As a result, there were more different Bumblebee toys during that time and into the early ‘90s than for any other Transformer. Of course, the alternate Goldbug version helped boost the number of toys they could make.
In the "Transformers" film, the robots had more of an alien feel to them to fit the theme of an alien invasion. The robots (stated by Optimus Prime) in the film are actual sentient organisms and not just giant, mindless, and mechanical machines. The robots can also speak their own alien language sounding like what seems to be based on different pitches and frequencies. Alongside that, they gave them more alien features that probably wasn't mentioned in the comics or T.V. series such as a highly advanced exoskeleton, force field, and a special "alien meteoroid" mode which they transform into individually and arrive on earth in. The exoskeleton is a "self-regenerating metal" in which the aliens are composed of (stated in the film) that is the equivalent of living skin that heals itself.

The "Underbite Jetpack Takedown" Optimus Kreon uses the new 2015 style of Kreon hips and torso, with a hollow hip-peg and a central post inside the torso for increased grip... which also makes them incompatible with about four years' worth of Kreons. Based on his appearance in Robots in Disguise, he features a new version of the Optimus helmet, this time lacking a moutplate. He attaches to an included jet pack, armed with two pressure-launch missiles.
TakaraTomy released another reissue based on the Encore version as part of their Chronicle line in 2011, lacking the original Generation 1 trailer. Instead, the Chronicle version was available in a two-pack with Dark of the Moon Deluxe Class Optimus Prime and a new trailer that could be used by both Optimuses, thanks to a retooled trailer hitch on the Generation 1 Optimus Prime figure.

It should be noted that in the lead up to the premiere of the Japanese translation of this series, TakaraTomy marketing director Masahiko Yamazaki indicated changes would be made to place it as a prequel to the 2007 Transformers live-action film. This would have made this version of Optimus Prime an earlier version of the film character. In practice however, the only changes that were made consisted of trimming for time to allow additional promotional material to be added to the start and end, and the name change of Bulkhead into "Ironhide" (with Ironhide becoming "Armorhide"). The future 22nd century Detroit setting and characterizations of the cast remain as they were in the original production.
This retool of Revenge of the Fallen Leader-Class Optimus Prime features the head from Buster Optimus Prime and has had his blades replaced with semi-articulated Battle Hooks for face-destroying action! He has a darker paint job and sports black splotches on his body and head to signify battle damage. However, due to these extra "battle damage" paint applications, some other paint applications that were present on the Revenge of the Fallen release were omitted. He also sports a new voice box in robot mode, replacing the infamous "I am Optimus Prime!" with "We must stop the Decepticons!" The international release, however, retains the same abbreviated "Optimus Prime" sound clip as the original release. To the annoyance of many fans, this version was the main version released just about anywhere outside the United States (all of Canada, Latin America, Europe, and Asia). The box also mentions racing sounds, which may or may not be referring to the button-activated diesel engine noises carried over from the Revenge of the Fallen version of the figure.
Although he was weak and low on energon, Prime made a last-ditch effort to save the day when he rammed through the wall of Megatron's energon-producing lab. G.I. Joe vs. the Transformers #5 After a quick recharge, Optimus single-handedly smashed the Decepticons, pounded Megatron to the ground, and ripped his fusion cannon off his arm. Prime then teamed up with the Joes and used Megatron's cannon to shoot down the SPS Satellite that had gone rogue and was destroying the island.

Although no scannable badge is located at his robot mode, the badge was located at his combined mode's left shoulder. The badge was impossible to be scanned while in-package due to the obstruction of the spring-loaded combiner chest kibble. Speaking of impossible, the badges on the re-releases of the toy can't be scanned by the game. The instruction sheet amusingly replaces Optimus's last picture in the transformation process with Sideswipe.
Platinum Edition Optimus Prime was only available as part of a 2-pack with Megatron, named "One Shall Stand, One Shall Fall" after Optimus Prime's famous line in the movie. In the United States and Canada, this set was officially released as an Amazon exclusive. It was also available in several of Hasbro's Asian markets (namely the Philippines and Singapore; it's currently unknown whether it was exclusive to any particular stores there or not). In Australia, it was sold at Myer stores, whereas in the United Kingdom, it was both sold at Toys"R"Us stores and available via Tesco's website (but never found in stores). Surprisingly, it was (and still is) a common find in Brazilian online stores.
Unite for the Universe Optimus Prime would have been a redeco of the 2007 Optimus Prime Voyager-Class mold in a similar style to the Leader-Class Buster Optimus Prime (see below), with a much more accurate and detailed paint scheme, including white stenciled flames. He would have come with a set of Jetfire armour parts to form the powered-up Optimus Prime seen at end of Revenge of the Fallen, and due to not having to form Jetfire's robot mode or his jet mode, the armour parts are far more accurate to the movie's design of them than the leader class Jetfire toy could manage. While not combined to Optimus Prime, the armour can be arranged to form a sort of weapon emplacement mode or a jet engine on the back of Optimus's vehicle mode.
This playset is a variation of Optimus Prime's dinosaur mode, but as a figure-8 racetrack. A launcher can propel Flip Racers through the track where they can activate a popup Chase and land in a jail. The Flip Racer MorBot is included but any Flip Racer is compatible. The raceway can be extended by attaching the Flip Racers launchers: Bumblebee’s Quick Launch Garage or Airport Blastoff Blades (sold separately).
Tomica Optimus Prime is a die-cast non-transforming toy of his truck mode from Prime. It was sold as part of the "Dream Tomica Series", a subline featuring exclusively fictional vehicles. Like all Tomica toys & all Generation 2 GoBots and Spychangers, Optimus Prime features smooth-rolling axle/wheel construction that lets the toys be quickly zipped along smooth surfaces. However, they do not convert into robot mode.
The most controversial line of this period was the Pretenders. Pretenders consisted of a Transformer contained inside an action figure shell who could "pretend" to be either a human or a monster. Complaints with this line were numerous, including the lack of articulation of the figures (the shells could only move their arms), the simple transformation of the robots within, and their increasing lack of resemblance to any sort of modern recognizable vehicle. Still, despite the complaints, the Pretender line continued through all but the final year of Generation One, with variations such as Beast Pretenders, Monster Pretenders, Classic Pretenders, Mega Pretenders and Ultra Pretenders, each with variations on the theme or increasing levels of complexity.
A younger version of Prime Optimus Prime is one of the playable Autobot characters in the 2010 video game Transformers: War for Cybertron. In the Autobot campaign, he starts off as Optimus, a warrior who rallies his fellow autobots against the Decepticons following the reported death of their leader Zeta Prime. He succeeds in defending the Autobots' home city of Iacon from Starscream and his forces. Optimus then receives a distress call from Zeta Prime. Knowing that this is most likely a trap set by Megatron, he proceeds anyway with a rescue mission. He lets himself, Bumblebee, and Sideswipe be captured by the Decepticons and is sent to a prison in Kaon, the decepticon capital, in an elaborate scheme to free Zeta Prime and all imprisoned Autobots. He frees all the other prisoners, and defeats Soundwave and his minions Frenzy, Rumble, and Laserbeak, but he is too late to save Zeta Prime. After taking Zeta Prime's body back to the Autobot high council, he is bestowed upon the well earned title of Prime.

As the number of sets released has increased, the harder it has been for stores to parcel out their shelving space. In order to make more sales, decisions have to be made as to which sets will be carried. Not every store can carry the whole product line (not even all official LEGO stores carry the whole product line). This process will favor the sets that drive sales the most, such as the licensed sets. The traditional boxes of bricks are pushed out of the way for the more profitable lines.


In late 1993, Hasbro relaunched the Transformers franchise with the Generation 2 line, with production again largely being done by Takara. The subgroups concept was done away with for the first year, but there were no new molds or characters. Generation 2 re-used the molds for many of the characters from the 1984 and 1985 line, but with mostly different color schemes and finishes, as well as different weapons and accessories. Megatron's figure was released later on. As noted previously, Megatron's original alternate mode, or "transformation identity", was a handgun with attachments, but in Generation Two, this was changed to a tank due to safety and security concerns. Most of the 1994 figures were re-releases or recolors of European G1 releases.
Apart from this, Optimus Prime is also the weakest link of the gestalt combination, due to a number of design failures attributed to his torso mode. The square holes-and-tabs used to secure the arms together when in torso mode are too weak to remain locked in place (though a very small amount of copies can secure the arm well), and are prone to falling out of position should an attached arm be moved. The torso mode's skirt plate is also attached to the stomach rather than the pelvis, rendering the waist swivel nearly worthless due to the skirt obstructing articulation.
Forming a roughly 11-inch figure when fully assembled, Diablock Convoy is highly articulated, using 12 ball-jointed block pieces, giving him a range of motion similar to Masterpiece Prime, with the exception of the head, which can only move up and down, not side-to side. Speaking of the head, it is by far the most stylised aspect of the figure, with no real attempt to approximate Prime's face or mouthplate inside a simplified helmet, mainly featuring only a reversed block that gives the odd impression of a cycloptic eye. It is possibly intended to actually represent his forehead grill, as a yellow block inside his head construction remains barely-visible through a slit in his face, possibly intended to represent the classic toy's yellow eyes.
A non-transforming but highly articulated Optimus Prime action figure(ine), Revoltech Convoy uses the Revoltech "revolver joints" for maximum poseability. Convoy comes with a Matrix and ion blaster accessories, as well as a few alternate hands. His sculpting is explicitly in the style of Pat "serfdom" Lee's interpretation of Optimus Prime in the Dreamwave Generation One comics, but due to physical constraints has no lack of perspective.
The "Unicron Trilogy" version of Optimus Prime is a fictional character of this branch of Transformers lore. Appearing in Transformers: Armada, Transformers: Energon and Transformers: Cybertron (known as the aforementioned trilogy), Optimus is the leader of the heroic Autobots. He often converted to his super combat mode. In all three series, Optimus' English voice actor is Garry Chalk, who previously voiced Optimus Primal in Beast Wars and Beast Machines.
Available exclusively through e-Hobby, this black and teal repaint of Hybrid Style Convoy features the traditional "Nemesis Prime" color scheme, but represents a version of Optimus Prime himself. In addition to all the original accessories, the toys also includes several more deliciously metatextual goodies, themed around the Generation 2 toy and comics: two new large guns patterned after the new weapons wielded by the Generation 2 Optimus Prime toy, and two additional (blue) Prime heads that can be swapped with the figure's regular noggin, sculpted explicitly in the style of Generation 2 comic artist Derek Yaniger. One head is pristine, the other decorated to match the battle damage seen on the cover of the first Generation 2 issue.
Hot Rod would make his first IDW Publishing appearance in a Spotlight issue focusing on him. In this, he was shown to be newly promoted to command of a group of Autobots including Gizmo, Backbeat and Dealer, who had been sent to secure the Magnificence, a device of some sort that could predict the future. Getting past the guardians, Hot Rod was swapping it with a fake to prevent the Decepticons from getting their hands on it when a seeming Decepticon ambush wiped out his squad. Determined to rescue the only survivor, Dealer, Hot Rod staged a daring solo rescue mission that managed to rescue Dealer - unaware that he was really Doubledealer, a Decepticon spy sent by Banzaitron to retrieve the Magnificence and now out to find where Hot Rod had stashed it.[10]
Originally, Optimus Prime was created as the leader of the Autobots, though it is unknown how he was created or his origins. In a possible future, Megatron was threatened by the existence of the Aerialbots and had Shockwave build a time machine to send them back in time to get rid of them. However, he only ended up changing history for the better. In the revised timeline, Optimus Prime began his life as a robot named Orion Pax, a mostly defenseless dock worker during the Golden Age of Cybertron nine million years ago, with a girlfriend named Ariel and a best friend named Dion. During this time, a new breed of robot with new flight capabilities appeared on the planet that Orion idolized. When Megatron, the leader of the new group of robots, approached him with inquiries about using one of the dock warehouses, Orion was swayed by Megatron. Both Orion and Ariel were severely wounded when Megatron and his forces attacked in order to claim the energy stored there. Searching for someone to help them, the time-displaced Aerialbots took Orion and Ariel to the ancient Autobot, Alpha Trion, who used them as the first subjects for the new reconstruction process he had developed involving rebuilding the frail Autobot frames into more battle-hardy configurations.
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