Menasor cut off Prime's escape and handed him the Reflector trio, who confronted Prime with a hologram of Serpent O.R. The new Decepticon leader carried Megatron's memories and information downloaded from Soundwave, from which he learned of the Matrix of Leadership. Serpent O.R. offered Optimus a trade: hostages and peace if he handed over the Matrix. Optimus agreed.
With the acclaimed Studio Series line marching onward triumphantly into 2019, we have just received a new review of the line’s latest offering, Battle-Damaged Megatron, which most of us know emulates Megatron’s appearance following the climactic final showdown between him, Optimus Prime and the Fallen in the second film. The review comes courtesy of YouTuber PrimeVs.Prime, who has thus far extensively catalogued the line beyond today’s subject. He goes into detail regarding the detailing - Read More
For Transformers: Age of Extinction, Optimus Prime initially transforms into a rusty 1973 Marmon semi cab-over truck and later on a new alternate mode in a blue and red Western Star 5700 Custom semi-truck.[31][32] After humanity turns on all Transformers, regardless of faction, Optimus and the other Autobots go into hiding. Eventually, they find themselves being hunted by a rogue organization called Cemetery Wind. Optimus is severely injured in a trap set by the group, while many of the other Autobots, including Ratchet and Leadfoot, are slain. An inventor, Cade Yeager, comes to Prime's aid and helps restore his health. After uniting with a small band of Autobots, Optimus faces Lockdown, a ruthless bounty hunter allied with the humans, and KSI, an organization that produces man-made Transformers. Optimus is captured by Lockdown, but the Autobots rescue him. Optimus is quickly losing faith in humanity, but at the urging of Cade, chooses to stay and fight a resurrected Megatron and his new army. Prime awakens the ancient Dinobots, and rides a newly tamed Grimlock into battle through Hong Kong. He kills Lockdown and Harold Attinger at the film's climax as revenge for killing many of his friends, including Ratchet and Leadfoot. At the end of the film, he leaves Earth and flies off into deep space, seeking to find out the truth about his mysterious Creators.[33][34]
Although the animated series ended in the U.S. after The Rebirth, Optimus Prime continued to appear in animated sequences of Transformers toy commercials, progressing from Powermaster to Action Master. He even made an appearance as a computer-generated Combat Hero. Many episodes of the series were re-aired to promote Transformers: Generation 2. During these sequences, computer-generated scenes featuring key G1 characters are borrowed from Generation 2 commercials to serve as opening, closing, and commercial bumpers. Optimus Prime is shown in the opening and closing fighting Generation 2's Ramjet.
Part of the first wave of Prime: Beast Hunters Voyager Class toys, Optimus Prime is a larger, all-new mold. He also transforms into a monstrous, flat-nosed truck, but differs from his Cyberverse toy by having a faceplate-less mouth, and by being equipped with a large four-winged backpack in robot mode. He features a 5mm port for each of his hands, one on his backpack, one near each of his front wheels, and one on each of his two upper wings.
Interesting work but I would like to know whether you would find the amount of new sets offered in toto has changed over the survey period. Is there an economy of scale at work? This seems to have two implications: first, the number of units for a particular set may have increased thereby affecting the price of all sets belonging to that class (but doubtful you could find exactly how many Death Star sets were produced in relation to, say, hogwarts castles); second, the popularity of certain set classes may affect what kinds of sets are available. Like with language, we are all confined to use the words we know. And so with Lego, set designers are confined to use what’s economical, unless, of course, the design calls for new styled pieces. These relations are difficult to grasp in statistical analyses, but would seem to play a role in price steering.
On Cybertron, Optimus Prime kicked back to do a little bit of paperwork and reminisce. With Shockwave defeated, Cybertron was enjoying a new era of peace. He was interrupted by Hot Rod, who reported that a group of "pesky humans with their peashooters" were giving an Autobot team on Earth a hard time. Prime suspected Cobra's involvement and counseled Hot Rod not to be so dismissive of the humans. The Art of War #1 When the team returned to Cybertron and mysteriously vanished in the Gladiator Zone, Prime was prepared to go search for them, but was convinced by Hot Rod to stay behind and organize a peace ceremony. The Art of War #2

As the Autobots were having trouble with Rumble, Optimus Prime told them try to use his earthquakes to their advantage, which led to the end of the Decepticon. Prime subsequently ordered the Aerialbots to combine and save Grimlock and Roadblock from falling off a cliff. Wolves As they got closer to the Cobra Terrordrome, however, Prime started regretting getting the Autobots involved with the humans' war. He offered to carry G.I. Joe across the water separating them from the Terrordrome, but told them that Autobots only fight if they have no choice, and they had no reason to fight anymore. Moments later, he saw that Cobra were using innocent prisoners as human shields, and Duke added that anyone who Cobra didn't enslave, they murdered. Filled with righteous anger, Optimus Prime ordered his troops to roll out. Trenches
For many, it may seems that the advent of licensed sets3 correlates with the perceived increase in prices. The 1990s and before were a nostalgic heyday of affordable LEGO sets. This is not quite true. Below is a chart that compares the price per piece of licensed sets and unlicensed sets starting in 1999. 1999 is the first year that LEGO had major licensed themes.
Virtually every toy in this list has a scannable insignia sticker on it. For Hasbro releases, it temporarily unlocks that toy as a playable character in the Robots in Disguise mobile game, and can only be scanned once per day. TakaraTomy releases simply check that off on their mobile app's collection list. It's honestly quicker and less redundant to say which toys don't have this feature. Meanwhile, scanning the Combiner Force toys' insignia stickers gives the player Tickets, which can be spent by giving them to Cryostase via the main map menu.

The main torso-bot is based on Generation 1 Optimus's original body. Two of his limbs are based on Armada Optimus Prime; one "normal" (Inferno helmet), one pre-Earth-body (Knock Out helmet). Another is based on live-action Optimus (Soundwave helmet), and the remaining one (Ironhide helmet)... actually looks to be based on the Optimus-like-but-not-Optimus Micromaster Overload! The heck?
The sequel series, Transformers: Robots in Disguise sees Optimus contacting Bumblebee to warn him of danger on Earth-a prison ship's complement of Decepticon prisoners escaping upon the ship crashing and appearing briefly in physical form to help Bumblebee's unlikely new team defeat the Decepticon Underbite. Optimus appears throughout the first season as a vision to Bumblebee, though he is only allowed to do so when the latter's need is dire. Residing in the "Realm of the Primes", Optimus Prime begins training to combat an "ultimate evil" where his first part of the training is overseen by Micronus Prime. At the conclusion of the first season, Optimus is upgraded by the Thirteen Primes when the Fallen arrives on Earth, during which he gains a body that closely resembles his Beast Hunters form. After the Fallen is seemingly destroyed, Optimus Prime remains with Bumblebee's group, though he states he would only do so as Bumblebee's "equal", rather than leader. However, the Thirteen subsequently reclaim the additional power they granted him, leaving him weakened but still determined to aid the team.
"Cybertron Optimus Prime" new features a darker grey plastic, and mostly shares the same paint mask to the original Deluxe class figure, with added paint details on his head and the mesh-like pattern on the front of his "entry" mode. The silver paint on his chest was slightly changed from the original and he lacks the paint on his feet, his "headlights", and the top of his "entry" mode. Lastly, he features Cyberglyphics on his vehicle mode windows, and the rear sides of the vehicle. His flame attachment is now cast in translucent red plastic with orange sprays.
Cyber Slammers Optimus Prime is an amazingly cute truck that transforms into an amazingly cute Autobot. "Slam" his robot mode down into car mode and he rolls along for a while, then snaps back up into robot mode. Sure to please the toddler you brought with you to the PG-13 movie! Like most Cyber Slammers, Prime manages to cram most of his vehicle mode's major details into a compact, super-deformed version of that mode.
This version of Leader-class Optimus Prime features a new lower face sculpt that lacks a faceplate, as well as the replacement of his fuel tank/exhaust assemblies with new, transforming versions that can combine into his ion blaster/barrage cannon. To the simultaneous pleasure and displeasure of people who had already purchased the first release of Leader-class Revenge of the Fallen Optimus Prime, Buster Optimus Prime features an extensive paint job that closely matches Prime's appearance on the big screen, including covering almost all of his grey plastic with silver paint or chrome, expanding and outlining all of the flame tampographs white for greater accuracy to ILM's computer model, and generally painting in small details, nooks and crannies that were neglected on the first release due to cost-cutting reasons. The red and blue plastic colors also vary from the original release, to better match his film appearance.

The figure was released in Japan along with Legends Megatron and Starscream, under the "EZ Collection" banner, in the same packaging as the Hasbro release but with a small card insert featuring the Japanese logo and nomenclature, similar to a USA Edition. As with all the EZ Collection figures, this release features a substantially greater number of paint operations that increase Optimus's resemblance to his larger figure.


But it is scary to think that there is a strong possibility they will look at redoing almost every Masterpiece now if this is a success. The MP+ releases have me feeling tired. I don’t have to get them but I have a completionist mentality. But a redo... I’m almost ready to check out of MP completely. I waited so long to get six seekers done pretty well to me. Now there’s a chance they will redo them. And soundwave. I sure hope I’m just being a worry wart.
When Sideswipe was accused and convicted of destroying the Nova Suspension Bridge, Optimus was infuriated that one of his own Autobots could commit such a heinous act. Optimus was tasked to hunt down and deactivate Sideswipe, though the task proved to be easy as Sideswipe did not run, hide or resist. After Optimus had deactivated Sideswipe, he was approached by Prowl, who pointed out that Sideswipe's actions made little sense, as he had committed the crime in broad daylight before many witnesses. Agreeing that the Decepticons might be behind the situation, Optimus allowed Prowl to take a team of Autobots to Carob Island to clear Sideswipe's name while Optimus and Jazz stayed behind to continue working on human/Autobot relations. Prowl returned with evidence that it was indeed a Decepticon-controlled clone of Sideswipe that had committed the crime. Optimus then presumably reactivated Sideswipe when his name was cleared. Deadly Paradise
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