In Transformers vs. G.I. Joe comics, Bumblebee is offed as well. His ship is damaged during a space chase with Starscream, so he lands on Earth where G.I. Joe and Cobra are going at each other (as per usual). But his fatal mistake was helping G.I. Joe favorite Snake Eyes, who was trying to take on Starscream. In the process, Bumblebee got in the Joe-Cobra crossfire and was ripped apart by missiles. This wasn’t a true death, however. First, Starscream took Bee’s head to Megatron, who wore it on a necklace (yes, really), but eventually the head got back to the Autobots, who planted it back on his repaired body and he came back to life.

Hot Rod is featured again in Maximum Dinobots. Returning to Earth to continue his search, Hot Rod arrived at the gates of the Machination's complex, and Scorponok prepared himself to deal with the intruder. Unfortunately, Hot Rod found himself fighting well out of his weight class as he was man handled by Scorponok, who cheerfully bashed his face in, put out one of his optics and snapped his leg. The Headmasters dragged him into Scorponok's control room where, with absolutely no prompting, the big man explained his entire plan for the Dynobots, Skywatch and the Machination. Hot Rod seemed less than impressed with this rather mundane approach, which ticked Scorponok off enough for him to point out that it was obviously just the first stage in his master plan. He was also warned to remain awed or he'd be of no further interest. When the Dynobots and newly arrived Monsterbots seemed to turn Scorponok's plan on its head, Hot Rod burst out laughing, at which point, Scorponok ordered him taken out and shot. In the lift to the surface, Hot Rod suddenly erupted in flames, killing his captors, but draining his power supply. Weakened and with a crippled leg, he collapsed on the floor.

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The toy that would ultimately end up as the original Optimus Prime toy was originally released in August 1983 as No.17 Battle Convoy from Takara's Diaclone Car Robo toyline in Japan. In 1984, Joustra released their own version (still with Diaclone sticker on the trailer) as part of their Diaclone line in Europe, either simply called Truck (according to the pack-in catalog) or Diaclone (in the pack-in comic). It's possible that GiG also released a version called Camion Convoy as part of their Trasformer line in Italy, but to this day no packaged sample has surfaced.

This retool of Revenge of the Fallen Leader-Class Optimus Prime features the head from Buster Optimus Prime and has had his blades replaced with semi-articulated Battle Hooks for face-destroying action! He has a darker paint job and sports black splotches on his body and head to signify battle damage. However, due to these extra "battle damage" paint applications, some other paint applications that were present on the Revenge of the Fallen release were omitted. He also sports a new voice box in robot mode, replacing the infamous "I am Optimus Prime!" with "We must stop the Decepticons!" The international release, however, retains the same abbreviated "Optimus Prime" sound clip as the original release. To the annoyance of many fans, this version was the main version released just about anywhere outside the United States (all of Canada, Latin America, Europe, and Asia). The box also mentions racing sounds, which may or may not be referring to the button-activated diesel engine noises carried over from the Revenge of the Fallen version of the figure.
Platinum Edition Optimus Prime was only available as part of a 2-pack with Megatron, named "One Shall Stand, One Shall Fall" after Optimus Prime's famous line in the movie. In the United States and Canada, this set was officially released as an Amazon exclusive. It was also available in several of Hasbro's Asian markets (namely the Philippines and Singapore; it's currently unknown whether it was exclusive to any particular stores there or not). In Australia, it was sold at Myer stores, whereas in the United Kingdom, it was both sold at Toys"R"Us stores and available via Tesco's website (but never found in stores). Surprisingly, it was (and still is) a common find in Brazilian online stores.

A redeco/new-head retool of the Rescue Bots Hoist the Tow-bot figure, Optimus Prime transforms from robot into a tow truck. Pulling the tow truck's hook up converts him back into a robot. The panel on the top of the cab has been remolded with additional truck detail in place of the Rescue Bots logo on Hoist, while the Rescue Bots insignia on his torso is unpainted.
An extremely simplified version of Optimus Prime, this McDonald's Happy Meal toy transforms into a trailer-less truck cab. He is formed out of a large percentage of translucent plastic, and can combine with the other Happy Meal Armada toys (Hot Shot, Red Alert, and Smokescreen) into a human (well, robot) pyramid-style configuration, notionally considered a "Mighty Robot".
Epic Optimus Prime is a 22 inches tall, non-transforming Optimus Prime figure, featuring limited articulation in the waist, shoulders and wrists. His chest can be opened to reveal a command center with a seat and room to display at least three figures. His arms also feature one seat each to accommodate more figurines. The back of his arms and legs are hollow with "shelves" that allow even more figurines to be displayed.
In the 21st century reimagining of the original continuity by Dreamwave Productions, Optimus Prime started life as a data archivist known as Optronix, or Orion to his friends. After taking note of a battle where the Autobot leader Sentinel Prime had been killed by Megatron, he was summoned to the Council of Elders and informed that the Matrix had chosen him to be the next leader of the Autobots. He received the Matrix of Leadership shortly thereafter, and arranged for the Autobot evacuation of Cybertron. He intended to leave the Decepticons to their own devices, but a battle with Megatron beneath the planet's surface, accompanied by visions from the Matrix, stirred him on to fight for the safety of his homeworld.
Of course, many voice actors have voiced him in different TV shows and video games over the years, in both English and Japanese. Most notably by a Power Rangers actor and a Batman voice actor. The latter is Will Friedle, who voiced Bee in the most recent series, Robots in Disguise, plus cameos in Rescue Bots, Transformers Prime, and the Predacons Rising TV movie. Friedle is well known as Batman’s voice in Batman Beyond. As for the Power Ranger, that would be Johnny Yong Bosch, who played Adam Park, the original Black Ranger. Bosch was Bumblebee’s voice in the video game Transformers: War for Cybertron.

Optimus Prime is primarily voiced by Peter Cullen in most of his incarnations, who voiced him in the original series. Following the production of the 2007 film, Cullen reprised his role for the sequels and supporting media and would even voice Optimus in later series such as Transformers: Prime. Optimus has been voiced by a number of other voice actors in other series such as Neil Kaplan, Garry Chalk, and David Kaye in the series Transformers: Robots in Disguise, Unicron Trilogy, and Transformers Animated, respectively.
This version of Optimus Prime is an all new mold, being the most movie accurate so far — or at least he was until Buster Prime came out. It comes with his two energon blades, and does not have a large gap at the back of the cab like the previous Leader-class Optimus Prime. It can combine with Leader class Jetfire to form Jetpower Optimus Prime. He is also very hard to transform. The process involves unclipping his firewall from his chest in a fashion that harkens to dissecting toys that lack screws, rivets or glue. In the meantime, he keeps saying, "I am Optimus Prime," over and over due to an overly sensitive voice clip trigger. Even the most die-hard Peter Cullen fan will be sick of his voice after five minutes of playing with this toy. That aside, the quality and articulation is top-notch and the poseability is amazing. Spring-loaded panels feature in his legs as well as ratcheting ball-and-socket ankles, G1 "transforming" sound effects, and multiple "Mech Alive" features raise the bar on this figure. Of note, the fists cannot accomodate standard accessories, and on test-shots of "Power Up" mode Prime has articulated fingers, like the 2007 toy, but this feature was dropped. Also, trying to transform Optimus from robot to vehicle mode can be very difficult at first.
After the film, in season three, Rodimus did not have time to rest on his laurels as commander, immediately finding himself and the Autobots targeted by the Quintessons, who lured him to their planet of Quintessa and detonated it in hopes of destroying the Matrix. Rodimus and the Autobots survived, however, and Rodimus proceeded to voluntarily short-circuit himself to allow his life-force to enter the Matrix, feeling that the answer to the mystery of the Quintessons' identity lay within it. His hunch proved correct – the Quintessons, he discovered, were the Transformers' creators, and Rodimus knew that the future would be a difficult time for the Autobots.
This is not to suggest that specialized pieces are bad. Far from it. LEGO Indiana Jones would never feel real without Indy’s whip; LEGO Board Games would never spring to life without their unique dice. But there’s no denying that specialized pieces are costly to produce, and their proliferation was a prime reason why the LEGO Group’s profits plummeted through much of the 1990s, despite steady sales.
When IDW Publishing received the rights to the series, author Simon Furman was hired to oversee the line. Furman decided that the Generation 1 continuity "was in need of ... a contemporary restart"[15] so that the comic could retain a modern audience. Furman's revised continuity establishes Optimus Prime as the present-day leader of an Autobot army spread across the galaxy in small units, waging a covert war against teams of Decepticon infiltrators over resource-rich worlds. The Stormbringer miniseries explains that the Transformer homeworld of Cybertron is a dead planet, ravaged by an ancient cataclysm caused by the Autobot-Decepticon War. Prime had been forced to ally with his arch-rival Megatron to end the destruction. In the series, the interference of Jetfire and the Technobots, in a plot organized by the Decepticon Bludgeon, alerts Prime to the possibility that the Cybertronian cataclysm might be re-ignited and spread to other planets. Prime calls in the Wreckers, meeting them on the surface of Cybertron in time to witness the return of the being called Thunderwing, the focal point of the apocalypse. The combined efforts of Prime, the Wreckers, Jetfire, the Predacon-led Decepticons, and a unit of aging Centurion drones are barely enough to render Thunderwing inert.
Every two weeks, Seibertron.com brings you a Top 5 list related to all things Transformers written by me, your fellow editor. These are our opinions so what matters most is what you guys think of the topic or list, and I hope to see your own lists or comments on omissions and ranking. Let's have fun! All previous lists can be found here. Top 5 Best Cliffjumper toys With Cliffjumper having a surprise appearance in the Bumblebee movie I figured we were due for a rundown of the best - Read More
A Toys "R" Us exclusive, the U.S. release of Masterpiece Rodimus Convoy by Hasbro does not come with the detachable trailer, but is offered with his Targetmaster partner Offshoot (renamed from Firebolt due to trademark issues) and a remold of Optimus Prime's Matrix of Leadership, which does not fit in his chest. Like the Takara Tomy version, a smaller Matrix that fits in his chest is included. While the Japanese version is based on the animation design, the Hasbro redeco bears a closer resemblance to the original G1 toy. Parts of the figure's legs have been re-engineered after owners of the Japanese version complained that the hinges of the leg armor easily broke off. Masterpiece Rodimus Prime was first offered at the 2011 San Diego Comic-Con International.

The series begins when Optimus and his crew, after picking up a disillusioned ninja named Prowl, are sent to clear rubble from a space bridge passage. There, the Autobots stumbled upon the Allspark and are immediately attacked by Megatron's battle cruiser, the Nemesis. Through treachery by Megatron's second-in-command, Starscream, Megatron was fragged and the Autobots crashed on Earth in the early 21st century. After being in stasis under Lake Erie for 50 years, the Autobots awaken in Detroit of the near future, where they immediately discovered humans in need and became heroes of the city after stopping a Sumdac Industries experiment gone wrong. During the battle for the possession of the Allspark, Optimus goes offline after defeating Starscream, only to be revived by Sari Sumdac and her Allspark-infused key.


Alternity Convoy was simultaneously available in both this silver coloration, and a deco based on his traditional appearance termed "Vibrant Red" (see below). The figure was later redecoed to create "Convoy Super Black" (representing not Optimus Prime, but Universe Nemesis Prime), Alternity Ultra Magnus, and Alternity Dai Atlas. It was retooled into Transformers GT GT-R Prime, GT-R Saber, GT-R Megatron and GT-R Maximus.
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Legion Class Optimus Prime has been found at Family Dollar and Dollar General stores in the United States. A later variant repleaced the red Autobot insignia with a black version. This later version was also released at general retail in Australia, New Zealand, Europe, and Russia. In Singapore it was released together with Bumblebee and Starscream as part of the promotion for Age of Extinction in selected cinemas.
When Jazz brought Steve Guymo to the Autobot base, Optimus and the other Autobots realized that the Decepticons were behind the abduction of humans from airports across the nation. They were able to find the captive humans, whom the Decepticons were intending to ransom to the US government, and free them before engaging Starscream and his squad in battle. With the Decepticons defeated, the Autobots returned to base where Optimus thanked Steve for his help. Sun Raid (Listen 'n Play)
This Cybertron spin pop consists of a generic handle with an Optimus Prime sticker, topped with a figurine of Prime through which the included lollipop slots. When the handle is squeezed, a manual gear mechanism spins both the figure and lollipop—no batteries necessary! The handle was also redecoed in orange for a Megatron spin pop, with a figure of the Decepticon leader on top.
This Japanese exclusive release of Optimus Prime features much more black coloring than the previous releases, and it's (coincidentally) based on the Fast Action Battlers Power Armor Optimus Prime toy, so as to be used with the similarly-repainted Legends Jetfire figure to form the Optimus' powered up combination. For some reason, he has red eyes. This redeco also uses the slightly small fuel tank/elbow tabs from the Battle Damaged release.
Not depicted in the instructions or stock photos, Roller can attach to Prime in vehicle mode via two tabs on the vehicle front which slot into two corresponding slots on Prime's feet. Another undocumented feature is that the butt of the Ion Blaster can be inserted between the barrels of Roller's weapon mode to form a longer weapon. Also not shown in the instructions but depicted on the stock photo on the card-back is that Prime's shoulderpads can be rotated up; the intended positioning for this is notched, although you can position them at other angles.
Hasbro has had a bit of a strange relationship with Bumblebee. In the early days (we’re talking mid-’80s) he was hugely popular, both on the TV show and as a toy, and Hasbro was sure to capitalize on that. As a result, there were more different Bumblebee toys during that time and into the early ‘90s than for any other Transformer. Of course, the alternate Goldbug version helped boost the number of toys they could make.
This mold was redecoed into Universe Optimus Primal and Beast Wars Telemocha Series DX Convoy, and retooled into Beast Wars Reborn/Beast Wars Tenth Anniversary versus pack Optimus Primal. Takara also created multiple special variants, including all-gold (from Tele-V Magazine, only ten awarded), red and gray (Tele-V again, but only one awarded), and blue-fur (a Comics Bom Bom design-contest prize, only five awarded).
This figure suffers from a design flaw, in that his knee joint pegs are slightly too big for their sockets, and that the resulting connection is so tight that it makes the sockets form stress marks and eventually crack, or even cracking during assembly. The problem can be remedied by simply sanding down the pegs prior to sliding the legs onto the peg.
Fire Blast Optimus Prime is a redeco of the previously released Power Hook Optimus Prime fast action battler. The color scheme is loosely based upon Generation 1 Rodimus Prime, explained rather oddly in the card bio as being the camouflage Optimus took while hunting Decepticons on Mars post-movie... because there are so many long-nose cabs driving around Mars. Yeah.

Softimus Prime is, as his name suggests, a plush G1 Optimus Prime toy. Obviously, he has no problems with articulation and passes the drop test with flying colors. His main draw is the ability to "transform" into his Freightliner FL86 vehicle mode by turning the plush toy inside out, his transformation roughly similar to the Powermaster cab Prime's. He is love, in bed.
Just like Optimus Primal's basic bat toy, this figure was released during the short-lived period when the Beast Wars was still considered to be an extension of the Autobot/Decepticon war, and Optimus Primal was the same character as Optimus Prime. This was soon relegated to the realms of micro-continuity when the Beast Wars animated series began and clearly established that the two Optimuses were different characters, but the toy remains one that was officially branded as Prime, and is consequently listed here.
Prime got his own rap segment. He was seen in his "Combat" toy body, waiting for Megatron as he attacked a human subdivision. Prime converted to robot form, blew up Megatron's weapon at point blank range, and slugged it out with him. Apparently emerging victorious, he was next shown sitting next to an identical truck, which kid mistook for the real thing. The real Prime then transformed and picked up the kid, inspecting the human with his cold, lifeless, flashing red optics. Combat Heroes commercial
The San Diego Comic-Con 2017 exclusive Optimus Prime figure is another redeco of the Premier Edition figure, which aims for a more movie accurate look than the original by still sharing the same paint masks, but replacing the chest's deco with flames and adding extra paint applications on the legs, arms, chest, head, tire rims, both sides of the engine compartment, and the sword and shield... but for some reason still sports the movie-inaccurate blue 'collar', as well as the smaller, less accurate vehicle flame tampographs instead of the more movie-accurate ones used on Dark Optimus Prime. His Autobot insignia is also moved on the upper back section of the air dam. He is packaged in a stylish, display-case-like-box similar to later Transformers: Alternators releases and the Hasbro Toy Shop/SDCC 2011 exclusive figure.
In reorganizing the company, LEGO became more efficient. The data shows that they have been able to standardize costs and it is likely that they were able to hedge the price of plastic against future price fluctuations. In protecting their business, they have also been able to normalize prices for their customers. A stable price is good for everyone; it helps LEGO ensure that future production costs are budgeted for and it helps the consumer manage their budget. This allows LEGO to protect and grow its market share.
Having launched a painstaking review of each of those 14,200 pieces in the LEGO universe, the Design Lab found that 90 percent of new elements were developed and used just once. And many components were duplicates. Among the dupes were eight minifig police officers and six minifig chefs, with barely decipherable differences between them. The Lab dealt with the redundancies by slashing the total number of components by more than 50 percent. When it reduced the product portfolio’s minifig chef population from six to one, designers protested and longtime fans howled. To calm the fans, LEGO tried humor: it held a mock online memorial service for the “dead chefs.”

Another game was released for the Sony PlayStation 2 by Atari; simply titled as Transformers, it was based on The Transformers: Armada. The game's reception was mixed, particularly due to the popularity of a PS2 Transformers game released at the same time for a Japanese-exclusive market, though the Armada game was of a higher quality and featured much better gameplay. The game not released in America was based on the Generation 1 storylines.

The smallest of the Energon Igniters, the 3-inch Speed series transforms between modes in 7 steps or less. Unlike previous small movie figures, this series has a lot of detailing and articulation. The bots don’t end up looking like carved blocks of plastic. They could use a few more paint apps, but that’s to be expected at this price point. They even interact with cores sold with the larger figures (though “interact” in this case seems to mean “tow behind”).


The character of Optimus Prime first appears in the 2007 Transformers film as the leader of the Autobots in the search for the Allspark. He intends to destroy it, even if it means sacrificing himself, before the Decepticons can use it to create a new army to conquer the universe. After arriving and scanning a Peterbilt truck, Optimus greets Sam Witwicky and Mikaela Banes, introducing his men and explaining why they have come to Earth. During the final battle, Optimus slays the hate-filled Decepticon Bonecrusher and faces his ancient enemy, Megatron. Unable to match Megatron in combat, Optimus urges Sam to push the Allspark into his chest, which will destroy them both. Instead, Sam rams the Allspark into Megatron's chest, destroying it and killing the Decepticon leader. The film ends with Optimus sending out a deep-space signal, inviting other Autobots to join them on Earth.

In the Escalation miniseries, Megatron engages Prime and, boosted by Ore-13, overcomes him. Believing their leader dead, the rest of the Autobots attempt to buy the newly arrived Hot Rod time to collect the clone. Prime, who had transferred his consciousness to a backup memory in his trailer command post, advised them to exploit Ore-13's weakness and assault Megatron all-out, catalyzing the Decepticon leader's Energon supply and crippling him.
In one reality, while the Autobots were boarding the Ark, Optimus voiced his lack of confidence in his leadership, before welcoming aboard Geosensus, who was incapable of transforming to robot mode. Four million years later, Prime and Prowl found the Ark was under attack and defended it with deadly force. In examining the wreckage of the attackers, they realised that the robot Optimus had destroyed was not a Decepticon but Geosensus, who had forced himself to transform in an attempt to fight off the Decepticons. Though Prime was willing to take the rap, Prowl insisted on covering up the mistake to protect Optimus's image as a leader. Parts
Here is another thing, people complain about the presence of stickers in a LEGO set. I have news for them, stickers keep down the cost of a set. The latest modular building will have stickers with it, but it isn’t the last time a set geared toward adults will have stickers with it. At least LEGO listened to our wishes and got rid of STAMPS (Stickers across multiple pieces). Still that modular will be the only set that will have a red baseplate and printed golden star tiles. Translation, that set will be very hot on the secondary market when it is retired. It is going to be very hard to source out the baseplate if people try to build Palace Cinema by sourcing its parts. (Which is a project some are doing with Cafe Corner and the UCS Falcon)

The first generation Optimus Prime transforms into a Freightliner FL86 cab over semi truck.[3] Within his chest is a mystic talisman, known as the Autobot Matrix of Leadership or the "Creation Matrix", carried by all Autobot leaders.[4] When Optimus transforms, his tractor cab disconnects to become a sentient robot, and his trailer opens to reveal an ion blaster, forming a combat deck.[5] The combat deck supports a mobile battle-station and command headquarters armed with assorted artillery and beam weapons that fire automatically. The combat deck can also serve as a radio antenna for battlefield communications between the autobots. The combat deck also included "Roller", a mobile scout buggy meant to scout behind enemy lines. When Roller is deployed, Optimus can see and hear what Roller sees and hears.[6] Injury to one component is felt by each of the others. If the combat deck or Roller were to be destroyed, Prime could survive. However, despite the slight degree of autonomy they possess, the combat deck and Roller would not be able to survive without Optimus.


This redeco of the Ginrai tooling of the Powermaster Optimus Prime figure (released concurrently with the 2001 reissue of the Ginrai figure) was a Toys R Us Japan exclusive black repaint, made to represent the original Optimus Prime equipped for a special mission. All of his red and blue plastics were changed to black, his clear blue windows were now tinted red, making his overall colour scheme very reminiscent of the now-familiar 'Black Convoy' color schemes.
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