The third version [18] would quite possibly have been the most gimmick loaded Transformer in the history of the line, simultaneously being a Powermaster, Headmaster, and Triple Changer. The Headmaster also would have been a Triple Changer, turning into a sort of armored four-wheeled rover (Roller II?) and robot as well as a rather silly looking Optimus Prime head with four vertically aligned wheels jutting off the sides. It seems that when the extra Headmaster gimmick was scrapped, the super mode head remained separate rather than being reintegrated into the trailer hitch such as on the earliest design. Notably, the body of this design is extremely close to the final design.
The mid-range Voyager class Movie Optimus Prime toy transforms into an amalgamation of the Kenworth W900 and the Peterbilt 379, making this toy fairly inaccurate to the actual vehicle Optimus Prime turned into. Because of the smaller size and lessened complexity, the Voyager class Optimus Prime features a significantly different transformation sequence compared to the Leader class toy, and indeed, the actual CGI design. However, as the actual truck cabin no longer forms his chest, the cabin now features a small interior with opening doors and a non-removable cowboy-hat-bedecked driver figurine that flips out of the seat when the driver's side door is opened.
A standard brick with two rows of four studs delivers a profit to LEGO that is orders of magnitude greater than any specialized element, all because the brick is what LEGO calls a “universal” or “evergreen” element that can be used in so many different sets. A one-of-a-kind, specialized piece, however, generally works in just one or a few sets. Moreover, the cost of molding a standard brick is orders of magnitude cheaper than producing a specialized piece.
Just as Marvel Comics produced a companion comic to the original Transformers toyline that differed from its animated counterpart, so did Dreamwave produce a comic to go along with the Transformers: Armada and Energon lines that owed little to their animated fellows. This incarnation of Optimus Prime, however, is not particularly different from his animated counterpart in personality.[51][52]
Available exclusively from Japanese clothing company A Bathing Ape in 2014, MP Convoy Reissue BAPE Ver. is a trailer-less redeco of the MP-10 mold sporting a green color scheme matching the Convoy Reissue BAPE Ver. of the original G1 toy, with "BAPE's famous camouflage pattern" and an ape head print on the shoulder replacing the usual faction symbol.
Prime would make one further surprise appearance in Dreamwave's Transformers: Armada comic series, although it would not be the Prime of Dreamwave's first series. When the Optimus Prime of the Armada universe disappeared, pulled into another dimension by the power of Unicron, the Chaos-Bringer sent something back in his stead: a nearly dead Optimus Prime from that universe, who warned the transformers of Unicron's coming into their universe before dying.
Prime is armed with a spring-loaded missile launcher that stores on the rear of his truck mode (which becomes the backpack of his robot mode) when not in use. Like most of the weapons of the Energon line, it sports a 5mm post, allowing it to be held by most every Enegon figure, to combine with assorted other weapons and Energon weapons released in the series, and to peg into numerous compatible ports shared by many figures, like the hole in the radar of Prime's own trailer, or even conveniently placed 5mm screw holes like those of the Prime Force.
This is not to suggest that specialized pieces are bad. Far from it. LEGO Indiana Jones would never feel real without Indy’s whip; LEGO Board Games would never spring to life without their unique dice. But there’s no denying that specialized pieces are costly to produce, and their proliferation was a prime reason why the LEGO Group’s profits plummeted through much of the 1990s, despite steady sales.
In robot mode, like Combat Hero Prime, the bottom of the truck became his familiar windowed chest based upon the original Optimus Prime toy. His main gimmick was light up LED headlights, and a lightpipe in the bottom of his right fist, illuminated by an LED in his right forearm, that would illuminate his clear sword or his double-barreled rifle if they were used in that hand. All three LEDs were activated simultaneously by pressing the sunroof-like depression on the roof of the truck.
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