Another version of Prime was also available in the second wave of the Smallest Transforming Transformers series as a chase figure. This almost entirely white version of the figure is clearly based on the version of the original Prime cab robot used in the Generation 1 Ultra Magnus figure, but was nonetheless sold as Optimus Prime for the Smallest line.


The original 1984 Optimus Prime toy was part of Takara's 1983 Diaclone toy line named "Battle Convoy". It was designed by the creative design team of Hiroyuki Obara, Shoji Kawamori, famous for his work in Macross, and Kohjin Ohno.[19] The toy's characteristics, such as the head design and the use of the cab front as the upper torso, have become design elements in nearly every incarnation and variant of Optimus Prime. This particular toy has been reissued multiple times, mostly to commemorate the anniversary of the transformers franchise. Optimus Prime was also released as an Action Master and Powermaster toy in the original transformers toy line.
MP-10 Convoy, advertised as a "perfect new model" on its packaging, is an entirely new tooling of Generation 1 Optimus Prime. Convoy is now smaller, making him more in-scale with other recent Masterpiece toys, such as Rodimus, and comes with a trailer and various accessories. While the front of the vehicle mode's cab is an accurate depiction of a mid-to-late-1980s Freightliner FLT cabover, the back half, (which is, as usual, made out of Convoy's legs) is much larger and robot-leggier in proportion. (So much that they sculpt a ladder on each side.)
Legion Class Optimus Prime is a redeco/retool of the first Revenge of the Fallen Legends Class figure, with the deco resembling the paint job from Optimus Prime's Western Star "5700 OP" concept truck. While the main body is identical to the figure, the arms and legs are newly tooled, with simple assemblies for the wheels. The retooled legs now features a more solid stopping point, which prevents the center front grill/legs to swing back further. It should be noted that his flame decals are painted over the side windows.
[…] What Happened with LEGO When I was working on my last presentation, I totally had the idea of buying a bunch of lego people and taking pictures to make the slides (like those awesome slide decks you see online).  However I was surprised to find that you didn’t just buy a pack of people, but you could buy different bodies, heads, beards, hair, and other accessories – oh, and they weren’t cheap! […]
This Trailer is identical to the original BeCool Trailer other than the stickers, and now comes with the trailer/launcher accessory from Bot Shots redecoed in blue with red stripes. While the vehicle mode sticker in his chest remains, the hand-holding and sleeping ones have been replaced by pictures of the launcher: one in base mode and one in trailer mode. He also comes with a sticker sheet for decorating the Trailer Base.

When I was a child in the 1960s, I bought most of my own Lego, using money from paper routes I had from the ages of 7-16. But the items I bought we not ‘kits’. They were small boxes of standard bricks. Each box contained only a single shape and colour, but you could find most of the basic shapes 1×1 or 1×2 or 1×4 or 1×8, 2×2 or 2×3 or 2×4, bevels, doors or windows, if you found the right box. The boxes were only 50 cents, and had an average of 12 bricks per box. That works out out to about 4-5 cents per brick. The kits were expensive, but buying the standard boxes was a lot cheaper, and that is what most people did back then. With my paper route, at the age of 7 I could buy 100 pieces per week using my own money. Name any 7 year old that afford to do that now!

Takara's version of the figure was released in their markets slightly earlier, as the first of what would come to be several installments in their Masterpiece line. In addition to coming with a cardboard trailer that the buyer could assemble to "complete" Prime's truck mode, Takara's release differed from Hasbro's by featuring longer smokestacks (kept short on the Hasbro version for safety reasons, but incorrectly shown to be long in the stock photography shown at right), and lacking the black scorch-marked "battle damage" paint applications Hasbro included on the figure's shoulders, wrists and abdomen.
In light of this news, if Optimus decided to nonetheless head back directly to Autobot headquarters, his squad returned to find their comrades nearly dead from the poison. But with Ratchet’s help, the antidote was quickly distributed, and the Autobots sprung back to life. Now cured, the Autobots discussed their next course of action; they had to prevent the Decepticons from poisoning the nearby water reservoir.
Power Surge Optimus Prime is a new mold, in the size of a Leader Class figure, which transforms in 7 steps. It comes with the Mini-Con Aerobolt, who transforms from a bird to his chestplate. This triggers electronic lights and sounds, as well as deploying a mask, two shoulder cannons, and a pair of large wings for the larger robot. His front truck kibble can be removed, but you can transform him into vehicle mode with the kibble on.
G1 Convoy comes with two sets of fists, each pair featuring differently-shaped fist holes: one pair with square holes to hold the figure's "Convoy Gun" (as his ion blaster is called), and the other with round 3mm-compatible holes to hold the spring-loaded translucent blue missile launcher (a generic accessory also available with Robotmasters Beast Megatron and Beast Convoy). The fists are swapped out by simply popping them out of the wrist-hinge that holds them in place; the figure also includes an energon-axe that can be inserted into the wrist instead of a fist.
Prime comes with all the accessories of his previous release, although his ever-changing ion blaster is now somewhat confusingly cast in blue plastic. He features one major additional accessory: an electronic display base sculpted with the image of the Matrix and the Autobot insignia. Pressing the insignia's crest triggers a series of electronic soundbytes, mostly quotes from the movie recited not by original actor Peter Cullen, but by Hasbro's in-house actor, Ron Hayden: "Autobots, transform and roll out!", "I want you to make a special run to Autobot City," "Megatron must be stopped!", "All we need is a little energon, and a lot of luck," and two samples of the classic transformation sound effect, one ascending, one descending.
This Japanese-exclusive black-and-gold redeco of First Edition Voyager Class Optimus Prime was available exclusively at the fourteen stores taking part in the Cybertron Satellite promotion. It depicts Prime coated in an alloy reverse-engineered by Ratchet from MECH equipment that protects Optimus against Dark Energon and other techno-biological hazards.
While exploring Cybertron's hemisphere of darkness, Optimus Prime became severly damaged, and unable to return to the hemisphere of light. Having been able to send out one last message before his memory was badly damaged, Optimus found himself unable to distinguish friend from foe, and would join (or rejoin) whichever faction found him first. Optimus Prime Is Back
Optimus has the ability to change any part of his robotic body into a tool or gadget. He has swing lines in his wrists. His wrists can also fire capture bolas. His arsenal includes a grappler, fire extinguisher and a negative friction spray. Unlike in all the previous series, his face can almost always be seen, because his mouthplate is retractable like in the 2007 live action film.

TakaraTomy released another reissue based on the Encore version as part of their Chronicle line in 2011, lacking the original Generation 1 trailer. Instead, the Chronicle version was available in a two-pack with Dark of the Moon Deluxe Class Optimus Prime and a new trailer that could be used by both Optimuses, thanks to a retooled trailer hitch on the Generation 1 Optimus Prime figure.
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