A slight redeco of Takara's Deluxe-size Optimus Prime was released as part of a special set commemorating both the 20th anniversary of Transformers and the 30th anniversary of its progenitor, Microman. Coming with an exclusive metallic redeco of Takara's Kicker, which was based on the Microman body, this Prime featured a chromed grill where the original had painted plastic, and supposedly slightly shinier plastics. Very slightly.
Optimus Prime has appeared in numerous video games since the introduction of the Transformers series. He makes a cameo in the 1999 Beast Wars Transmetals video game for Nintendo 64, where he is killed by Megatron at the end of the campaign, showing what would have happened in the Beast Wars series with a Predacon victory. Prime is also one of the playable characters in the 2003 Japan-only Transformers game for the PlayStation 2 and the 2010 Transformers: War for Cybertron. Optimus Prime is also playable in the Hasbro Net Jet Transformers fighting game Transformers Battle Universe. Three versions of Optimus Prime are playable characters, including the first generation incarnation, his incarnations from the 2007 live-action film, and the incarnation from Transformers Animated. In this game, Optimus Primal is also a playable character. He is a regular character in the Nintendo GameCube and PlayStation 2 2003 fighting game DreamMix TV World Fighters. He appeared as a boss in a simple Flash-based video game on the Hasbro web site.[25]
Rodimus appeared in the text-based fiction Dungeons & Dinobots as one of the Autobots who attacked the Arch-Ayr fuel dump. Sent to capture rogue Dinobots for the Autobots, he was part of the group that captured Swoop. Together with Blurr, he then tracked Grimlock, but ran into competition with the Decepticon allies Sideswipe and Cliffjumper. After Grimlock bit off his left hand Ratchet replaced it with a circular saw (a reference to one of the original Rodimus' melee weapons in The Transformers: The Movie).
Available exclusively from Japanese clothing company A Bathing Ape in July 2011, concurrently with a range of exclusive Transformers t-shirts, "Convoy Reissue BAPE Ver." (コンボイ復刻版 BAPE® Ver.) is a redeco of the original Optimus Prime toy sporting a unique new green color scheme, along with a tan trailer decorated with a camouflage pattern. Both trailer and Prime himself feature the A Bathing Ape logo in place of an Autobot symbol, while the floor of the trailer's Combat Deck mode features new Bathing Ape-themed labels. The figure comes in a recolored version of the original Japanese Optimus Prime packaging.
He’s continued to be lovable through many different continuities, all the way to the current live-action film series. But as much as you love him, there may be a few things you don’t know about him. So let’s take a look at some of his strange real-world facts, storyline goofiness, pop-culture tie-ins and even his relationship to Back to the Future.

If Optimus instead followed Prowl’s plan, he instructed his troops to transform into vehicle mode and play dead. The Decepticons, believing the Autobots’ ruse, disarmed themselves in order to carry out the Autobots’ “carcasses.” Now with the element of surprise against unarmed opponent, the Autobots Transformed and were able to easily defeat the evil robots.
While the Transformers animated series came to an end in America in 1987 after The Rebirth, production was continued in Japan with three new, exclusive animated series spin-offs to continue the story. The first of these series, Transformers: The Headmasters, supplanted the events of The Rebirth. With the Decepticons defeated, the Autobots entered into an even closer relationship with Earth. The Autobots also began the colonization of other worlds, the first of which was the planet Athenia, where Optimus Prime was stationed. It soon became apparent, however, that the consequences of releasing the energy of the Matrix to cure the Hate Plague were more far-reaching than Optimus had anticipated. Without the energy of the Matrix to act as a balancing factor, Vector Sigma had become destabilized. The Decepticons suddenly returned to exploit this, assaulting Cybertron in order to seize control of the mega-computer. Prime took a squad of troops to aid in the battle on the planet. When the arrival of the Autobot Headmasters tipped the battle in their favor, Prime broke off from the main attack and headed down into the depths of the planet, planning on stabilizing Vector Sigma at any cost.
The Animated Tech Spec written by Derrick J. Wyatt in Hasbro Transformers Collectors' Club #24 states that Rodimus as having the rank of Prime and clearly being the leader of a team like Optimus and Sentinel. His toy is listed as "Rodimus Minor" which Hasbro explained at San Diego Comic-Con 2009, was because "there were already too many Primes in the toy line". Within the series, he is only ever called or credited as "Rodimus".
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Although the animated series ended in the U.S. after The Rebirth, Optimus Prime continued to appear in animated sequences of Transformers toy commercials, progressing from Powermaster to Action Master. He even made an appearance as a computer-generated Combat Hero. Many episodes of the series were re-aired to promote Transformers: Generation 2. During these sequences, computer-generated scenes featuring key G1 characters are borrowed from Generation 2 commercials to serve as opening, closing, and commercial bumpers. Optimus Prime is shown in the opening and closing fighting Generation 2's Ramjet.
One of the single rarest Lucky Draw Figures in existence, this "Custom Color" redeco of Super Optimus Prime was limited to only one in the world. It was the grand prize of a coloring contest held in Septemeber 2005's TV Magazine, in which entrants colored in lineart of Prime with the deco they wanted to see. The winning entry was in green, blue and gold, while ten runners-up received one of five gold or five silver Lucky Draw versions of Prime.
The original 1984 Optimus Prime toy was part of Takara's 1983 Diaclone toy line named "Battle Convoy". It was designed by the creative design team of Hiroyuki Obara, Shoji Kawamori, famous for his work in Macross, and Kohjin Ohno.[19] The toy's characteristics, such as the head design and the use of the cab front as the upper torso, have become design elements in nearly every incarnation and variant of Optimus Prime. This particular toy has been reissued multiple times, mostly to commemorate the anniversary of the transformers franchise. Optimus Prime was also released as an Action Master and Powermaster toy in the original transformers toy line.
With the major threats taken care of, Optimus Prime turned his and the Autobots' attention to identifying and shutting down the rogue projects taking place across Earth using stolen Binaltech technology and secrets. It was during one of these missions that Optimus Prime faced off against Nemesis Prime, both in Binaltech Dodge Ram forms. Initially, things looked bad for Optimus Prime, as he was no match for his opponent's spectral armor. However, the Protector merged with Prime, and the enormous power that resulted allowed Prime to reflect Nemesis Prime's final attack, obliterating the evil Decepticon. Optimus Prime recalls the union of the two sparks being familiar, from an event in the distant past. Optimus Prime is reassured by the Protector about "the seeds of the future" and the Protector is revealed to be Optimus Primal.
In an alternate version of the following events, Bumblebee would return to base, reporting that the Decepticons were planning to destroy the humans' farmlands in an attempt to starve mankind and force them into submission. Upon hearing these news, Optimus gathered a squad of Autobots and headed out to stop the evil robots. However, once they found themselves in the open country, they found themselves at the mercy of a Decepticon ambush; Bumblebee had been fed false information! In one iteration of the events that followed, Optimus could have avoided his death if only he had listened to your warning! In another iteration, Optimus had to decide whether he should send his Autobots away to the safety of a nearby bridge while he fended off the encroaching Decepticon horde, or if he should remain by the side of his troops as they all made a break for the bridge. Remaining as a single unit would spell their doom, but by sticking together, the Autobots could make it back to the safety of their base. Battle Drive
The percentage in the title is not a turn of phrase nor something inferred in any way, it comes from a quote by Bumblebee movie producer Lorenzo Di Bonventura. Whether Bumblebee is a prequel or reboot (or anything in between) has been a hot topic for fans , especially those who want to distance themselves as much as possible from the previous films made by Michael Bay. These debates have reached Bonaventura who sat down with Metro and explained why to him, the Bumblebee film was 100% a prequel - Read More

When the Ark's sensors picked up two Transformer power emissions in the Brazilian rain forest of non-Decepticon origin, Optimus headed into the field to investigate, bringing along Jazz and Blaze. Though their search went poorly at first, the surrounding vegetation interfering with their energy trackers, one of the mystery Transformers soon found them! The source of the readings turned out to be two terrifying robot dinosaurs! As Optimus charged one of them, Megatron and his troops turned up, and blasted the Autobot leader unconscious. He awoke to find the Decepticons fleeing in defeat, and the creatures transformed into their Autobot forms. Grimlock introduced himself and Snarl, but told Optimus that they wouldn't be following the Autobots back to home-base, as they had two more companions to unearth first. Optimus bid him farewell with a handshake before leaving to carry on the war against Megatron. The Dinobots!
With the data from the piece price evaluations I was able to also evaluate the average size of LEGO sets each year. As you can see on the chart below, the average size of sets released each year stayed somewhat constant from 1980-1990 until around 2000 which set sizes started to increase. The average set size seems to have peaked in 2008 (which saw the release of the Taj Mahal), but since then it hasn’t fallen to its pre-2000 levels. It seems to have found a new normal around 300 pieces.
In the grand Optimus tradition, the cab of Laser Optimus Prime disconnects to become the highly poseable robot mode of Prime himself. Like Powermaster Prime and Hero Prime, the toy features the iconic windshield pecs and grill abs, despite not actually being formed from the actual truck components they emulate. In robot mode, pressing the button on Prime's cab (now on his back) activates a red LED in his right fist which illuminates his clear-plastic sword (which stores beneath his legs in truck mode).
But it is scary to think that there is a strong possibility they will look at redoing almost every Masterpiece now if this is a success. The MP+ releases have me feeling tired. I don’t have to get them but I have a completionist mentality. But a redo... I’m almost ready to check out of MP completely. I waited so long to get six seekers done pretty well to me. Now there’s a chance they will redo them. And soundwave. I sure hope I’m just being a worry wart.

Note: Although American importers shouldn't have too much trouble, those living in parts of the world using higher strength A/C current outlets should be warned NOT to simply plug the A/C adaptor in with only a socket adapter, as this will overload the device and fry it completely. Buying the appropriate kind of universal A/C adaptor and a stepup/stepdown transformer (the electrical kind) with advice from an electronics specialty shop is recommended.
This Optimus Prime is a new mold that matches the character's more cartoony and simplified appearance in the Q-Transformers: Mystery of Convoy Returns cartoon. The "Watashi ni ii kangae ga aru" added to his name means "I have a good idea" (私にいい考えがある). A line originally spoken by G1 Optimus Prime at various times in the Japanese dub of the original cartoon, it has a reputation as a catchphrase of his among Japanese fans and has been reused by many Optimus Primes since, including the Prime in the Q-Transformers cartoon.
Activision and Traveller's Tales, creators of the Lego Star Wars games, released Transformers: The Game in 2007, accompanied by Transformers Autobots and Transformers Decepticons, to tie in with the live-action feature film for the Sony PlayStation 3, Microsoft Xbox 360, Nintendo Wii, Nintendo DS, PC, Sony PlayStation Portable, and PlayStation 2. The player was able to play as both the Autobots and the Decepticons, pick up and throw objects, and transform at any time. The steering in vehicle mode was compared to that of the Grand Theft Auto games and had a free-roaming environment.
The Jetwing jet pack attaches onto Optimus Prime via a part that hooks onto one of the hinges behind his neck, and a spring-loaded clamp that latches onto a recessed area under Optimus' back. The fuel tanks that form Optimus' Ion Blaster must be removed for this mode, and they can be stored inside the engines for the jet pack. The Jetwing can be used on previous Leader Optimus Primes from Revenge of the Fallen onwards, but due to the lack modifications seen in Jetwing Optimus Prime, the combination isn't as stable. The jet pack features four MechTech ports on the main wing articulation points, and two C joint mounting points on each wing. The Gatling Cannons both feature two MechTech ports and 2 C joint mounts on either side of each cannon.

Late in 2008, this version of Optimus prime was one of four Classics figures repainted into HasbroToyShop.com exclusives (the other three being the Megatron from this set in G1 colors, Grimlock repainted into Overkill, and Mirage repainted into Dragstrip). Unlike those three, it's debatable just how much repainting went into Optimus, but he comes in a snazzy new box.
Rodimus also appeared in the Dreamwave Energon Comic. In this continuity Rodimus's history in unclear, but he seems to be a veteran Autobot assigned to Earth. He acts as a mentor to many of the less experienced Autobots: for example he was the first to congratulate Ironhide when he overcame his fears to defeat Tidal Wave. He was one of the defenders of Toronto alongside Hot Shot, Red Alert, Hoist, Beachcomber and Thrust, battling against Divebomb and a swarm of Terrorcon clones before receiving help from a very unlikely source - Megatron, resurrected in a new body by Optimus Prime. The subsequent counterattack routed the Terrorcons.
Part of the first wave of Bot Shots Series 1 launchers, this repaint of Optimus Prime comes with a large trailer that pops open to form a battle station with a spring-loaded launching platform. He appears to have the same plastic colors as the single release, and the same set of paint operations, but his paint is done in different shades, having glossy dark blue paint and glossy bright red paint. The black part of his launcher is sculpted to look vaguely like the repair done that is part of Generation 1 Optimus Prime's repair bay.
Released as part of the Allspark Power refresh of the movie line, First Strike Optimus Prime is a extensive redeco of Voyager class Optimus Prime in a colour scheme based upon Generation One and Classics Optimus Prime. The included toy bio describes this coloring as Prime paying tribute to the markings he wore as a young soldier when the war began. Due to the transformation scheme, this figure actually ends up being less like its G1 counterpart in robot mode, a sacrifice made for the slavish redeco of the vehicle mode. You can't have your cake and eat it too, folks.
The 1992 and 1993 European and Canadian releases make up what is often called "Generation 1.5", much to the annoyance of many UK fans. These toys are similar in design to the Generation 2 Transformers, having lightpipe eyes, and pastel colors. The 1993 European figures used the G2 faction symbols which Hasbro UK designed because their licence on the G1 symbols had expired. The 1993 figures were repackaged for European G2 release in 1994, and three subgroup molds got used in the US G2 line.

This deluxe-size, highly-poseable version of Armada Optimus Prime is an entirely new mold, retaining the ability to tow Super Base Prime's trailer, though he cannot combine with it. He comes with the Mini-Con Over-Run, who can transform into a gun for him, or can peg onto the Powerlinx plug on Optimus's back to activate a double-fisted "punching" action (that looks more like hyperactive shrugging). Like the Super Base figure, Prime has a flip down chestplate, but lacks a molded-in Matrix, and his smokestacks can be removed (and in many cases will simply fall off), but cannot peg together as a gun. Shipping in a great many waves throughout most of the later run of the line, Super-Con Optimus became a notorious pegwarmer.


Part of the first wave of Prime: First Edition Voyager-Class toys, Optimus Prime transforms into a truck, with a similar (but more complex) transformation to his previous Deluxe-Class toy, and features a faux-kibble window-chest panel as well as a detailed truck cab interior. He comes with a "Cybertronian battle sword" and a "plasma cannon", either of which can peg into his hands. The cannon also features a 5mm peg-hole on the underside of its barrel, allowing the sword (or any other compatible accessory) to mount there as a bayonet. They are stored in vehicle mode by pegging them onto either the 5mm-compatible trailer hitch, or onto each peg-hole beside it, although the instructions tell you to peg the sword facing forwards onto the hitch, with the cannon mounting backwards onto one of the side pegs. His trailer hitch ends up on his right robot leg, and he has a fake, sculpted, equally-usable trailer hitch on his left leg. He features a cardboard stand as with all "First Edition" toys, but the weak adhesive used for its flaps mean it often has trouble supporting the weight of a Voyager class figure for an extended amount of time, the top caving in as the glue gives way.
In "Reunification", Optimus is seen building his new ultimate weapon, Omega Doom. He learns that Megatron has supposedly been killed by watching a broadcast from the Autobot reporter Rook. When Kup leads the Autobots Camshaft, Hound, and Warpath, in an attempt to assassinate Optimus Prime, the Autobot leader easily defeats the four rebels. Alpha Trion then attempts to kill Optimus, but Optimus uses Omega Doom against the ancient robot. Prime then sends Doom against the Decepticons.
A limited edition of the Optimus Prime toy sold as a mail-away exclusive by PepsiCo was made available in North America in 1985. This version of the figure came with a small fold-out leaflet glued to the top-right of the packaging, which contained two Pepsi logo stickers for the buyer to attach to Prime, mid-way through the traditional silver-and-blue stripe on his trailer. Canada also got a version of this promotional figure, but with much larger stickers that were the full length and height of the trailer. This promotion would go on to serve as the inspiration for the Japanese character of Pepsi Convoy, who would in turn be released by Hasbro as a new "Pepsi Optimus Prime" in 2007.
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