The original Ultra Magnus figure has been reissued and redecoed several times down the years, and this article strives to list each edition of the figure under its own heading. The first alteration to Magnus, however, was a running change made while he was still on shelves: Originally, his tires were made of rubber and he sported paint on both his small and large robot heads, but this version was soon replaced with one featuring plastic tires and no paint on either head. In addition, the clear yellow plastic that formed his windows was removed from the cab, leaving just holes instead; and his thighs and fuel tanks were left white, as opposed to the vacuum metalized chrome ones of the original release.
Take one part bicycle, two pages out of the Flintstones automobile design book and one hard-spoiled child and you have a pedal car. It seems like a really fun idea in theory but, in actuality, the single-speed gearing of a bike mixed with the weight of the metal shell, seats and wheels meant operation of the thing bordered on child labor. Still, the pedal car remained very sought after for generations to come.
Optimus made his way to the Primal Basilica, where he found Perceptor standing over the Mistress of Flame's battered corpse. Unable to do anything for her, Prime activated the Basilica's defenses as a means of stalling Trypticon. Learning from Perceptor that Rodimus had given up the Matrix, the two entered the chamber of the Chorus of the Primes to have the Matrix returned to him. Desperate Actions However, Optimus revealed the Matrix was not for him, but rather for Perceptor, as he wanted to make sure it would be taken as far away from Trypticon's grasp as possible. He guided Perceptor to a secret exit from the Basilica and sent the scientist on his way. Run for Our Lives Warned by the Chorus to "beware the power of the Primes", Optimus charged back towards the battlefield and began attacking Trypticon, rescuing Victorion. Optimus led the Combiners in battle against Trypticon, but the Titan managed to hit him, sending him hurtling towards some sharp rubble. Thankfully, he was caught at the last moment by Fortress Maximus. In Good Hands

In Transformers: Armada, Optimus Prime shares the role of main protagonist with Rad, Alexis, Carlos, Starscream and Hot Shot. The Optimus of this universe shares many similarities with his parallel universe versions, including nobility of spirit and a strong desire to protect all humans on Earth. In this continuity, the two sides are not looking for energon, but a small race of power-enhancing transformers known as Mini-Cons. Optimus led his small band of Autobots to stop Megatron from acquiring their power for himself.
Hasbro's original plan for the Beast Wars was to have Optimus Prime, renamed Optimus Primal, and Megatron be reformatted versions of their 1980s selves. This was shown in the toys's Tech Specs, and in the comic packaged with the basic Optimus Primal/Megatron two-pack. Hasbro also wanted the "Mutant Heads" found on all of the deluxe sized first year toys as battle helmets, but Mainframe scrapped the idea as it would have required three animation models for each character instead of two. Another designed feature for the 1995/1996 toys was carried over from Generation 2, transparent "light pipe" eyes. However, most toys had those parts cast in opaque plastic.
An extremely simplified version of Optimus Prime, this McDonald's Happy Meal toy transforms into a trailer-less truck cab. He is formed out of a large percentage of translucent plastic, and can combine with the other Happy Meal Armada toys (Hot Shot, Red Alert, and Smokescreen) into a human (well, robot) pyramid-style configuration, notionally considered a "Mighty Robot".
In the first nexus, when Swoop reported back to Autobot HQ that the other Dinobots were being controlled by Bombshell's cerebro-shells, Optimus had to decide whether to stop them with an immediate full-scale assault, or consult the Ark's computer. If he led an immediate attack, the cerebro-shells were jolted loose when his troops carried out his order to, "Bring them down fast and hard". If he consulted the computer, he then had to choose between its plan to have Windcharger remove the shells from a distance with his magnetic powers, or go with Mirage's idea to lure the Dinobots over Bandit's Bluff with an Optimus Prime hologram. If he chose Mirage's plan, the Dinobots charged over the cliff and into the ocean, where they were salvaged for repairs back at base. If he let Windcharger lead operations at the bluff so he could confer with Skids about some strange activity near Dolphin's Bay, it was out of his hands whether Windcharger accidentally tore the Dinobots to bits, or harmlessly removed the cerebro-shells. The latter outcome led to Grimlock telling Optimus that Bombshell said controlling them was just part of a larger plan, and the Autobot leader realized that it might tie in to Skids's report. Skids and Bumblebee could investigate in Wheeljack's new mini-sub, but should he send Sludge along with them?
This Japanese e-Hobby exclusive is a redeco of Targetmaster Kup, made to represent the character [[Optimus Prime#The Transformers cartoon|Orion Pax]] from the cartoon episode War Dawn. He transforms into a Cybertronic pickup-truck thing. His truck bed has a peg-hole to mount his partner Barrelroller, who also serves as a hand-held weapon. The set also came with a re-deco of Wheelie as Dion.

I agree with Aidan but would expand on his point. It’s not just that the sets seemed bigger; they were. As the relative complexity of sets has increased, so too has the piece count, but there has been an overall decline in the size of the models due to increased build complexity and a corresponding reduction in size of the pieces required to create such detail. The negative affect on perceived value in this is apparent, though I would argue, misguided when one considers the build quality and detail of new and recent sets.
In 1989, the entire line became limited to Pretenders and Micromasters. For the first time, the Transformers received a new design for their title logo. But many also regarded this as a time of a dearth in creativity and the lowest point in the toyline's history. The year 1990 saw the last American burst with the release of more Micromaster characters and the introduction of the Action Masters, non-transforming action figures who came with Transforming companions. Larger Action Master sets came with transforming vehicles and bases. The Action Master line was criticized for its perceived desperation for a gimmick, although it had a few defenders. The line predictably faded and would be the last Transformers output in the US until 1992.
Optimus and Bumblebee snuck into the Decepticons' base, and found their enemies upgrading themselves with Autobot parts. The pair took offense to this, and Bumblebee set about sabotaging the process. Megatron wound up tripping on some gumballs thanks to the Autobot's mucking about, and Optimus congratulated his fellow Autobot on a prank well done! Intro!
A nice article but I see a few flaws. First of all if the distribution of LEGO sizes/prices is increasingly skewed it is better to either split the sample or look at medians or rolling medians than averages. Secondly, this is a perfect case to run a regression panel regression with time dummies to see both the impact of time and the impact of size on the prices.
Optimus Prime's body was hauled out of the Arctic Ocean by the US military. While a terrorist organization run by the enigmatic Lazarus was able to seize control of several of the other Transformers that fell back to Earth, the military worked unsuccessfully to reactivate Prime. They eventually called in Spike Witwicky. Prime Directive #1 Spike was forced by the project chief, General Robert Hallo, to use his piece of the Matrix to reactivate Prime. Functional again, Prime used the Matrix to reactivate more of his fallen comrades. Prime Directive #2
Part of a cross-promotion between Toyota and TakaraTomy, the deluxe-sized FJ Optimus Prime transforms into an FJ Cruiser, with his axe weapon becoming the vehicle's spare tire. The vehicle mode's body panels come packaged on the sprue, and can then be clipped onto the core figure. The mass retail release of FJ Optimus includes yellow and white panels, whilst further color variations were available when purchasing an FJ Cruiser at Japanese Toyota dealerships. As is typical of TakaraTomy exclusives, these variants came in grayscale packaging.
Cyber Slammers Optimus Prime is an amazingly cute truck that transforms into an amazingly cute Autobot. "Slam" his robot mode down into car mode and he rolls along for a while, then snaps back up into robot mode. Sure to please the toddler you brought with you to the PG-13 movie! Like most Cyber Slammers, Prime manages to cram most of his vehicle mode's major details into a compact, super-deformed version of that mode.
The Universe incarnation of Generation One Optimus Prime is a redeco of the Robots in Disguise Scourge's Spychanger toy, a smaller, simplified version of the original mold. He replaces most of the black plastic with predominantly red and blue, with silver for detailing, with an overall deco making him resemble the original Optimus Prime. Like most Spychangers, he features high speed axles and can roll very well across smooth surfaces, but lacks the weight to propel him quickly.
The values started becoming inconsistent and skewed in Generation 2 and Beast Wars, when Hasbro apparently thought no child will ever want a toy that is described as anything less than perfect. Thus it became rarer and rarer to see any low numbers. Most characters' numbers hardly ever dipped below 8, the Go-Bot version of Optimus Prime was the first character to have all values at 10, a trend that would repeat for most "leader" characters. When even more powerful versions of the Optimus Primal toy (such as Optimal Optimus) were introduced, Hasbro even invented a "10+" rating in an attempt to keep increasing the power levels. With the Transformers: Cybertron line a few characters even got "Unknown" and "Infinity" ratings.

Super class Energon Optimus Prime transforms into a Cybertronic short-nosed truck cab. A switch on his back offers four selectable sound effects, each one corresponding to one member of the Prime Force, the four drone vehicles contained within Prime's parallelogram-shaped trailer. A tiny, slightly recessed button above the switch activates the sounds. When Prime transforms to robot mode, the trailer stands upright to become a launch base of sorts for the Prime Force, with three of the trailer's four storage compartments featuring launching mechanisms that propel the vehicles into action. The Prime Force consists of Fire-1, a fire truck with an extending ladder and rotating turret; Copter-2, a helicopter with spinning rotors; Digger-3, a drill tank with a gear-wheel-activated spinning drill; and Submarine-4, a submarine with opening capture claws beneath its bow. The four interchangeable drones can combine with Prime to create his Super Mode; any drone is capable of forming any limb. When in Super Mode, Prime's chest panels are opened, in turn pressing a button on his side that creates more electronic sounds and lights up a red LED in his chest, representing the Spark of Combination.
Transformers Siege Greenlight will be released sooner than later, especially compared to exclusives from previous years. We have our first preorder up on Amazon.ca revealing two important points: who the exclusive retailer is and what the price point will be. Now we know that it will be an Amazon exclusive. While we only know for sure that this will be the case in Canada, it stands to reason that it will be an Amazon exclusive elsewhere to, which is great news since those are always the - Read More
Part of the first wave of Prime: Beast Hunters Voyager Class toys, Optimus Prime is a larger, all-new mold. He also transforms into a monstrous, flat-nosed truck, but differs from his Cyberverse toy by having a faceplate-less mouth, and by being equipped with a large four-winged backpack in robot mode. He features a 5mm port for each of his hands, one on his backpack, one near each of his front wheels, and one on each of his two upper wings.
Optimus includes an spring-loaded missile firing "ion cannon" modeled after Megatron's shotgun from Dark of the Moon, with the missile features a sculpted shotgun nozzle on the front section. It can be held in his hand or attached to the top of the truck cab or truck bed via 5mm post, and, in an unadvertised feature, sports tabs on the rear-most handle that allow the Dark of the Moon Voyager Class Megatron toy to wield it. Also undocumented is the fact that the weapon can be stored under either of Optimus' shoulders.
While Transformers ended poorly for the US market, the same can not be said for the UK, Canada, and Japan markets as they went on to produce their own continuing series between 1991 and 1993, despite the UK market in particular missing a substantial amount of figures prominent in the comics and animated series throughout the line's run. Each country produced their own continuity. The UK and Canada continued with new Action Master figures and introduced the Turbo Masters and Predators. Japan continued with the Micromasters concept.
Unite for the Universe Optimus Prime would have been a redeco of the 2007 Optimus Prime Voyager-Class mold in a similar style to the Leader-Class Buster Optimus Prime (see below), with a much more accurate and detailed paint scheme, including white stenciled flames. He would have come with a set of Jetfire armour parts to form the powered-up Optimus Prime seen at end of Revenge of the Fallen, and due to not having to form Jetfire's robot mode or his jet mode, the armour parts are far more accurate to the movie's design of them than the leader class Jetfire toy could manage. While not combined to Optimus Prime, the armour can be arranged to form a sort of weapon emplacement mode or a jet engine on the back of Optimus's vehicle mode.
Prime's personality had been copied onto a floppy disk by Ethan Zachary, the technician running the game. He employed Prime in various video game scenarios he developed. Prime's damaged mind led him to believe that he himself was a video game character and, in an attempt to bring him back to life, Goldbug, Joyride, Slapdash, and Getaway took the disk to the planet Nebulos. They built a new body for Optimus Prime and upgraded it with the ability to combine with the trailer to form a larger robot. In an effort to keep Transformers off their planet, the Nebulans had poisoned their fuel. The sensation of dying, however, convinced Prime that he was truly alive and not a game character. To save his life, the Nebulan scientist Hi-Q bonded with him, creating Powermaster Optimus Prime. A UK story set around the same time in UK #198, Prime returned to Earth and tried to rekindle his feeling for the planet. After a battle between his forces and an advance force from Cybertron ruined a small town's Christmas festivities, he realized that bringing the Transformers to Earth was far worse than anything his troops could have done and vowed to protect its inhabitants from Decepticon aggression.[6]

Many who received their first LEGO set in the early 1990’s are now adults looking forward to buying a LEGO set for their first child or for themselves. When we are younger, we do not fully understand how money works. We do not realize that a large LEGO set can require hours of work to earn. We only know what we want. I would wager that it isn’t until our first jobs that we can fully appreciate the value of money. We all wanted the large sets as kids and we didn’t realize how hard our parents had to work for them.
Prime was perpetually at the forefront of the action throughout the early years of the war on Earth, usually confronting Megatron, though in some rare instances, such as against the Insecticon-controlled Decepticons or the Combaticons, teaming up with him for the greater good. He has suffered his fair share of battlefield scrapes, almost meeting his end when his vital cosmotron component was critically damaged by the Decepticon jets and when Laserbeak had his body disassembled and turned into Decepticon trophies, such as a pet "alligaticon" and a defense laser.
He includes the Sword of Judgment and Sentinel Shield accessories, which he can respectively wield and mount on his left forearm, all via 6mm post. In truck mode, the sword is stored underneath, while the shield mounts onto the trailer hitch. The sword also features a 5mm post on its hilt. Interestingly, the truck mode is able to pull G1 Optimus Prime's trailer.
This redeco of Leader-class Optimus Prime replaced most of the plastics in the cab robot with colored translucent equivalents, with chromed silver wrist-pipes, a golden chrome Matrix, and red chrome window frames. His trailer remained opaque, but was cast in much deeper red plastic, with a more metallic silver used for his cannons. He was available only in a Toys"R"Us Japanese exclusive giftset released in October 2005, with a redeco of Wing Saber, and the Coby Sen'yō Rumble.
Optimus Exprime's electronics are slightly less complex than those of Kenzan and Gekisoumaru. In robot, dragon, and train modes, pressing a button sets off red flashing LEDs and causes him to play one of seven sounds or phrases (which do not change depending on the mode). Pressing and holding the button activates a combination mode similar to the ones found in Kenzan and Gekisoumaru. Optimus Exprime calls on Kenzan and Gekisoumaru to combine with him, and then combination music plays as the LEDs flash blue, purple, and red (with the two halves of his Autobot insignia showing different colors!). Completing either combination by snapping the correct kabuto helmet into place ends the combination mode and triggers another phrase.
Available exclusively at the Tokyo Toy Show 2012 (along with Prime Shining Optimus Prime), Black Optimus Prime is a very minor redeco of the previously unreleased Gentei! Gentei! black version of Henkei! Henkei! Convoy, itself a redeco of the Classics Voyager Class toy. As such, Black Optimus Prime is mostly cast in black plastic, with some gray parts, translucent red windows and teal paint operations.
Minor note: Powermaster Prime's animation model as used in the commercials and as a character guide for the Marvel comics is a composite of the second and third designs. The body of the model is actually a straight tracing of the concept lineart for the third version (including its different rifles and twin faux shoulder stacks), with a slightly simplified drawing of the second version's head drawn on top.
The figure seems to have some transformation scheme & design related problems in it: The front truck cab's upper two pieces are supposed to be pushed to the front in robot mode, but the piece keeps collapsing back due to looseness when the figure is standing straight (Though pressing the two halves together firmly tends to reduce this issue for a while), while the tab underneath the truck grill does not connect well with the bottom port. Additionally, his 5mm compatible hands have a slight problem with wielding weapons with short 5mm posts.
When the Decepticons turned up in the same forest that the Autobots were taking a vacation in, Optimus took great pleasure in stopping them and returning the forest to pristine condition. Forest Rescue Mission Optimus was undertaking some repairs when Bumblebee offered to help, but Prime told him the repairs were too hard for him. When later the other Autobots were dismissive of Bumblebee's report of a Decepticon attack, Optimus alone listened to him, and they subsequently defeated the Decepticons. Bumblebee's Dangerous Mission
A mode for Arms Master Optimus designed for underwater combat, "Aqua Screw Mode" was shown in Cybertron Satellite segment of "Explosive Sword Transformation! Wheeljack and Dreadwing". C.L. and Balo are combined into a propeller engine and attached to his right foot, their GR and G redecoes do the same for the left, and B.H. B is attached to his right shoulder to act as a radar system. He wears Arc S's blade on his right arm and wields the Giga Tornado Cannon Combo Weapon.
With Season One of Cyberverse drawn to a close, we have word of a newly-listed Cyberverse DVD currently available for pre-order. Titled ‘Transformers Cyberverse: The Journey’, the anthology consists of 66 minutes of product, which can only be assumed to consist of the first six episodes, given the DVD’s plot synopsis and the title of the collection corresponding to the show’s fourth episode, ‘The Journey’. The DVD itself is listed here by New Zealand based online retailer - Read More
These include two large guns, patterned after the new weapons included with the G2 version of the classic Optimus Prime toy, which can be attached to the trailer in a similar fashion to those of Powermaster Prime. Also included are two additional (blue) Prime heads, sculpted explicitly in the style of Generation 2 comic artist Derek Yaniger's interpretation of Prime, especially as seen on the cover of the first issue, one pristine and the other battle-damaged.
Part of the first wave of the Combiner Force assortment, Optimus is a roughly Scout-class sized figure that changes from his futuristic truck with a combiner chest that doubles as his spoiler into a robot in three four extremely simple steps. His individual robot mode only has limited articulation on his shoulders. He also has a little green arrow above the connector on the truck bumper indicating where to crash him to combine with other figures. A 5mm post hole on top of his vehicle mode can accommodate a compatible accessory or Weaponizer Minicon, though he cannot use it in his individual robot mode.
Marissa and Prime are now on the run from the EDC and are also frequently attacked by the mysterious "Legion" Transformers. When faced with such foes, Marissa unleashes her "Kiss Player" ability by kissing Prime, fusing with him once again, increasing his power so that he can best their opponents. Prime is armed with the Surf Blade, a weapon formed out of Marissa's surfboard, wielded expertly thanks to the knife skills Marissa passes on to him when they merge.[18]
Optimus was checking up on the Autobots' ongoing energy collecting campaign when Wheeljack informed him that a disturbance in Sector 33HM of space-time would eventually cause major problems in its time-stream. Optimus assigned the investigation of this disturbance to Bumblebee, then noted that Hot Rodimus had not completed his latest report, communications with the young Autobo having been lost while he was on his own mission. With a brief inspirational speech, he urged his subordinates to redouble their efforts in maintaining harmony throughout reality. Little did Optimus suspect that in his own universe, Megatron was planning a coup against the Autobots... Uprising
The BK tie in toy of Optimus Prime is essentially two toys in one. The first part of the toy consists of two truck halves, which snap together around a sculpted robot mode Optimus Prime. The truck is squat, and primarily blue, with outbursts of chalk gray paint and red flames. Pulling back and letting go activates the gimmick: Prime "drives" forward and bursts from the truck mode, "transformed" to robot mode. This gimmick has marginal success.
A Leader class toy that transforms from fire truck to robot. The front end of the fire truck can form a robot resembling Generation 1 Prime, while the rear section can form a battle station or combine with him to form Super Fire Convoy. The rear section has an extending ladder with retractable water cannons and missile launchers. This battery-operated toy features siren sounds and voice samples of Fire Convoy (saying the lines, "Fire!" and "Kyoudai Gattai! Super Fire Convoy!").[41] Fire Convoy can combine with God Magnus (sold separately) to form God Fire Convoy.[42] This toy was designed by Takara's Hisashi Yuki.[43]
This is a weird one. Back in the late-’80s, the original TV show had ended and Marvel Comics decided to take the “transform” part of the property a step further and gave a handful of Transformers an organic, human-looking shell. Bumblebee was one of the lucky Autobots to get one. According to the storyline, the Decepticons developed the technology first, but the Autobots secretly caught wind, made their own human shells, and fooled the bad guys into thinking they were fighting mere humans, until they burst out of their shells.
Another Hasbro release of the MP-10 mold, which is basically a reissue of the 2010 Transformers line's Masterpiece Optimus Prime, but with the Japanese release's ID Number. Surprisingly he is NOT mistransformed on the initial official photography... until secondary stock photos had the vehicle mode slightly mistransformed. Unlike the original, Hasbro version, this version features silver paint on the interior of the trailer. This version also removes the red paint on the die cast hinge piece in his body and replaces it with blue paint. Sadly, this figure doesn't come with the Key to Vector Sigma. Due to compact packaging, the trailer is prone to scuffing.
The "robot mode" of Optimus Prime is where the pullback motor and working wheels of the toys lie. Optimus is sculpted in blue plastic, pre-posed in an odd crouching pose with zero points of articulation. His right knee is bent back, with his right arm touching his knee, while the left side has the leg forward and the left hand holding onto his butt. The toy is as sparsely painted as the truck, with light blue eyes and chest windows, gray hands and feet among other parts, and red forearms. Two panels on his back have red flame tongues on them.
Fellow Seibertronian Actar has written an in depth review on the new Transformers Studio Series Jetfire. He gave us great images of all modes including the combined mode and the giant cannon. We see how it scales with both SS ROTF Megatron and the ROTF Fallen. Enjoy! Alrighty! Just got my hands on the latest SS Voyagers and Leaders. However, the one that has won me over the most is Jetfire. So, I was rather hesitant and critical about Jetfire when I first saw him, but - Read More
It may be that the price of an individual brick has gone down over time, but what does it matter if the size of the bricks has decreased overtime? Sure, the average number of pieces in a set has increased, but how many of those pieces are tiny details? To answer this question, I compiled all the weight data on brickset.com and compared the sets by their price per gram in a similar fashion to how I compared them by price of piece. Below is the chart of my results (prices are in US dollars).
The 1992 and 1993 European and Canadian releases make up what is often called "Generation 1.5", much to the annoyance of many UK fans. These toys are similar in design to the Generation 2 Transformers, having lightpipe eyes, and pastel colors. The 1993 European figures used the G2 faction symbols which Hasbro UK designed because their licence on the G1 symbols had expired. The 1993 figures were repackaged for European G2 release in 1994, and three subgroup molds got used in the US G2 line.
Early in this new series of encounters with Megatron, Red Alert contacted the Autobots on Earth and asked for Optimus Prime to join then on Velocitron. Ransack and Crumplezone tricked Hot Shot and Dirt Boss into believing that a race between them would determine which of them would be allowed to race Override for the Planet Cup. During the race, Ransack and Crumplezone caused a rockslide that buried Hot Shot. Hot shot was saved when Optimus Prime, Vector Prime, and Landmine arrived, but Optimus was upset that Hot Shot had become involved with the locals. Clocker and Brakedown were eager to help the Autobots. After being unable to obtain the Planet Cup from Override herself, Optimus Prime endorsed Hot Shot's plan to win the cup in a race with the aide of the other Autobots. Ransack and Crumplezone were contacted by Megatron and were told to keep on eye on things. They also decided to enter the race, either to win the cup and cause as much damage as they could to the other racers. Override, Dirt Boss, Ransack, Crumplezone, Optimus Prime, Hot Shot, Red Alert, Landmine, Clocker and Brakedown participated in the qualification round.
Somewhere along the line, G.I. Joe picked up the familiar storyline that we all best associate with the toys: G.I. Joe Team vs. the Evil Cobra Organization. A classic tale of good vs. evil. Well guess what. Somewhere else along the line the franchise picked up a very different storyline and a new look to boot, highlighted by the newest figurine: The DARK NINJA MASTER.
A Voyager-class two pack of Classics Optimus Prime, representing the Generation 1 version of the character, and a redeco of Age of Extinction Evasion Optimus Prime representing the Movie character (The deco patterns is most likely to emulate the character's design in 2007, with vague results). Like Rusty Optimus Prime (seen below), he features flames on his vehicle mode doors.
In the Autobot Campaign, Optimus Prime provides intelligence and missions to Bumblebee in his search for the Allspark. Eventually, the clues lead the Autobot to Sam Witwicky. After saving Sam from Barricade, Bumblebee finally completes preparations for the Autobots to arrive on Earth. Once on Earth and having informed the two teenagers of their mission, Prime and the Autobots are discovered by Sector 7. Optimus sends Jazz on a high-speed destruction distraction mission, then sends Ironhide to rescue Jazz from a double-threat posed by the government agents and various Decepticon scouts. When Bumblebee is captured, Prime transforms and chases the chopper which from which the small Autobot is tied. After a lengthy chase, Prime manages to catch the net, only to be thrown off by another Cybertronian meteor. As Bumblebee is carried away, Optimus promises he will not fail him again. Jazz informs him that the meteor is not an Autobot. Prime confronts the new threat, who turns out to be the Decepticon triplechanger Shockwave. The two battle it out across Tranquility before Optimus finally destroys him. During the battle, Optimus overhears Starscream's transmission revealing the location of the Allspark. Optimus then returns to an intel role as he guides Bumblebee in his mission to retrieve the Allspark from Hoover Dam. Unfortunately, the Decepticons manage to free Megatron, leading to the final battle in Mission City. As the Autobots battle it out with the Decepticons to protect Sam and the Allspark, things seem to take a turn for the worse as Megatron finally arrives. Before he can claim the Allspark, Optimus attacks him. Optimus defeats Megatron and leaves him on the ground, seemingly devoid of life. However, just as Sam is giving the Allspark to Optimus, Megatron awakens, leaping at Optimus with his chain-flail out, making one last attempt at defeating his adversary. Optimus grabs the chain, pulling Megatron in closer, and, with the Allspark clutched in his fist, delivers a punch through Megatron's spark, killing him. Optimus reflects on the losses and rewards of this battle, as the Autobots have a new home, but many were killed in the battle. The story ends with Optimus and the Autobots choosing to remain in Earth, proclaiming it as their new home.
The Goldbug change happens in many different continuities, but in the original animated series, it happens like this: while trying to rescue the body of the dead Optimus Prime, which was being held by evil humans, Bumblebee’s damaged by Superion so badly that they have to rebuild him as a more powerful Throttlebot. His new body is much shinier, so a restored Optimus Prime dubs him Goldbug. In the Shattered Glass continuity, he goes evil as Goldbug. And in the IDW comics, confusingly, Goldbug was never affiliated with Bumblebee, but is the leader of the Throttlebots.
Available only with the Bot Shots Dragon Track set, this version of Optimus Prime is a new mold, changing from a robot form resembling Generation 1 Optimus Prime, into a truck with a rocket exhaust molded into the back of its trailer. As a Flip Shot, he, er, flips up when auto-transforming. He comes with a launcher that can be connected to the track, as well as Flip Shot Megatron and his launcher.
These include two large guns, patterned after the new weapons included with the G2 version of the classic Optimus Prime toy, which can be attached to the trailer in a similar fashion to those of Powermaster Prime. Also included are two additional (blue) Prime heads, sculpted explicitly in the style of Generation 2 comic artist Derek Yaniger's interpretation of Prime, especially as seen on the cover of the first issue, one pristine and the other battle-damaged.
Part of the first wave of Siege Voyager Class figures, Optimus Prime transforms from robot to short-smokestacked Cybertronian armored truck and back. He includes two weapons compatible with the C.O.M.B.A.T. System—the "W-50 Dual-Mech Energon Strikeshield", which is an axe that transforms into a shield, and the "W-M3 RF Ion Blaster". Both weapons can combine to form the "Sentrystrike Ultra-Blaster". Optimus Prime also features "battle damage" paint applications on several parts of his body, as well as multiple hardpoints all over himself and his weapons to accommodate "Fire Blasts" from the Battle Masters assortment, which can be used to simulate blaster fire or explosions.
A heavy retool of Combiner Wars Ultra Magnus, this Optimus Prime is based on the Powermaster Optimus Prime toy from 1988. Despite this, Hi-Q (now renamed 'Autobot Apex', presumably for trademark reasons) doesn't form the engine on Prime's chest; instead, he transforms into a de-faceplated version of the original Powermaster Optimus Prime cab robot head, over which a helmet slides during transformation to complete the Powermaster Prime look. In all three of Optimus Prime's modes are various pegs and seats with which Titan Master figures can interact. Like other Leader Class figures, his base mode can connect to other Titan Returns figures with base modes.
A large, non-transforming toy that features light & sound effects and voice tracks by Peter Cullen. The figure itself is a representation of Optimus Prime combined with Jetfire's parts - only designed for younger children. A lever on his waist extends his wings, and flying sounds are emitted when he is moved around off the ground. The Power Bots line replaces the 2007 Cyber Stompin' line of the first film.

Hey now, dont lump all geewunners together lol. Im all about g1, and love seeing g1 inspired, yet evolved designs. Such as the bee movie, and the recent toy lines. That said, I do respect others opinions. My son prefers bayverse on most and thats ok. I hate bayverse designs (except barricade and nitro zues in the last movie, badasses) but alot of people grew up on that, and it makes hasbro money, so no reason to hate it all together.
The Happy Meal version of Energon Optimus Prime features a very similar transformation sequence to his larger figure, though his limited articulation means that his shoulder insignias aren't visible in robot mode when his arms are facing forward. His torso is hollow to contain his electronic "Energon Cube" accessory, which generates effects when activated by remote control. This remote is in the form of the Mini-Con jet Wreckage, and can mount on the top of his cab in truck form.
The figure was released in Japan along with Legends Megatron and Starscream, under the "EZ Collection" banner, in the same packaging as the Hasbro release but with a small card insert featuring the Japanese logo and nomenclature, similar to a USA Edition. As with all the EZ Collection figures, this release features a substantially greater number of paint operations that increase Optimus's resemblance to his larger figure.
Then he dreamed of awakening, only to find his troops smashed. Realizing his only hope for survival lay with Cybertron, Optimus then boarded the ship the Autobots were repairing, and travelled back to his home planet. Arriving on Cybertron, he found it completely under Decepticon domination. Optimus then met an old Autobot codger who pleaded that he return to Earth to gather a force that could overthrow the Decepticon’s regime. Optimus remorsefully told the old Autobot that there could be no reinforcements from the planet Earth. The two Autobots were then swarmed by Decepticon police officers, who Optimus fought until his dying breath…

In 1984, a volcanic eruption re-activated the Ark, which, in turn, brought the Transformers back on-line. Prime led the Autobots in their opening battles to prevent the Decepticons from plundering Earth's resources, but, following their initial victory, the Transformers were all deactivated by Shockwave. Shockwave killed Prime and leeched the energy of the Creation Matrix from his mind. He used this energy to give life to his creations, the Constructicons. Shockwave was unaware that the Matrix was not just a program in Prime's mind, but a physical object in his chest. Before Shockwave could give life to Jetfire, his next Decepticon, Prime transferred the Matrix energy into the mind of Buster Witwicky. Buster used the energy to turn Jetfire on Shockwave, allowing Prime to reclaim his body and retake leadership of the Autobots. As a reward, he gave Jetfire true life.
The series begins when Optimus and his crew, after picking up a disillusioned ninja named Prowl, are sent to clear rubble from a space bridge passage. There, the Autobots stumbled upon the Allspark and are immediately attacked by Megatron's battle cruiser, the Nemesis. Through treachery by Megatron's second-in-command, Starscream, Megatron was fragged and the Autobots crashed on Earth in the early 21st century. After being in stasis under Lake Erie for 50 years, the Autobots awaken in Detroit of the near future, where they immediately discovered humans in need and became heroes of the city after stopping a Sumdac Industries experiment gone wrong. During the battle for the possession of the Allspark, Optimus goes offline after defeating Starscream, only to be revived by Sari Sumdac and her Allspark-infused key.

A mold for a standard LEGO piece costs anywhere from $50,000 to $80,000; over its lifetime, it will spit out some sixty million bricks. The cost of making the mold, spread out over all those bricks, is essentially zero. But when designers concoct a specialized piece and LEGO manufactures just fifty thousand of them, the molding cost rises to as high as $1 per piece. Including just a few of these specialized pieces, as LEGO did with unrelenting frequency during the Plougmann era, can potentially kill a LEGO set’s profit potential.
It should be noted that in the lead up to the premiere of the Japanese translation of this series, TakaraTomy marketing director Masahiko Yamazaki indicated changes would be made to place it as a prequel to the 2007 Transformers live-action film. This would have made this version of Optimus Prime an earlier version of the film character. In practice however, the only changes that were made consisted of trimming for time to allow additional promotional material to be added to the start and end, and the name change of Bulkhead into "Ironhide" (with Ironhide becoming "Armorhide"). The future 22nd century Detroit setting and characterizations of the cast remain as they were in the original production.
If Optimus instead followed Prowl’s plan, he instructed his troops to transform into vehicle mode and play dead. The Decepticons, believing the Autobots’ ruse, disarmed themselves in order to carry out the Autobots’ “carcasses.” Now with the element of surprise against unarmed opponent, the Autobots Transformed and were able to easily defeat the evil robots.
Apart from this, Optimus Prime is also the weakest link of the gestalt combination, due to a number of design failures attributed to his torso mode. The square holes-and-tabs used to secure the arms together when in torso mode are too weak to remain locked in place (though a very small amount of copies can secure the arm well), and are prone to falling out of position should an attached arm be moved. The torso mode's skirt plate is also attached to the stomach rather than the pelvis, rendering the waist swivel nearly worthless due to the skirt obstructing articulation.
Optimus dueled Megatron atop of an overpass in a human city. Though he managed to knock Megatron's cannon loose early in the scuffle, Megatron managed to turn the tables on the Autobot leader, reattach his primary weapon, and blast his old foe. When Megatron moved in for the kill, Optimus got his second wind, and knocked Megatron clear off the overpass. They were always real to me.
The Japanese release of Powermaster Optimus Prime actually represented a new character named Ginrai, and featured several retools: the cab featured die-cast metal, shortened smokestacks, vacuum-metalized plastic and clear blue windows, while the trailer was given retractable super robot fists. This Japanese version was eventually issued by Hasbro in 2003 as part of the Commemorative Series collection (see below).
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