We're sure we're not telling you anything you don't already know when we say that Hot Wheels are miniature die-cast cars with dynamic multi axular momentum technology (ie, they roll). They are usually based on real-life production cars but sometimes are modeled after bad acid trips, with wheels added later (for the rolling). Shortly after the introduction of the cars, Mattel launched various tracks to take full advantage of the cars' rollability.

He comes with a MechTech rifle converts into a large battle axe, and can be locked in by pulling the lever all the way in and tilting it into a gap to the left. The rifle has a separate flip-out handle, while the axe uses the rifle's long barrel as the handle, meaning that Optimus can grip the axe with both of his hands. This weapon was also retooled in a running change, adding a stop to the handle instead of relying solely on the gear system to prevent the locking assembly from flying off into parts unknown.
Released in the first wave of the Authentics toyline, "Autobot Optimus Prime" is a new mold the size of a 2015 Robots in Disguise Battle Pack toy. He changes from an evergreen-inspired robot into a more G1-based truck in just four steps. His instructions are incorrect; for truck mode, his legs must be folded in before the arms, otherwise the locking tabs on the arms will get in the way. Due to his transformation, he ends up with no elbows and a fake chest. He also has problems standing up due to hollow legs.
The main difference is an extensive redeco, rendering Prime in his traditional colours instead of the iPod-inspired white. (Yes, it actually had more to do with iPods than Magnus, believe it or not.) Reminiscent of the Kiss Players, iPod Optimus Prime's entire ABS/PVC structure is painted over, including his fists and the silver stripe that runs along his chest. His wind shield is colored blue like the one in the 2002 New Years Convoy reissue. The silver-grey trailer has a fairly elaborate deco, featuring detailing that resembles the outward appearance of the traditional Prime trailer, including the doglegging blue stripe and Autobot symbol, an effect somewhat marred by the large, visible gap on one side. When reconfigured into dock mode, the interior surfaces surrounding the speakers are decorated with black-on-silver techno-patterns as well as three, count 'em, three logos proclaiming the name "Optimus Prime". The recessed space also features a stylised, almost Frank Milleresque, high-contrast portrait of Prime's face, although this would be largely covered by the intended insertion of an iPod.
For Universe, a redeco of the Armada Super-Con Optimus Prime in more Generation 1-inspired colors was released in a Sam's Club exclusive five-pack alongside Runamuck, Longrack, Buzzsaw, and Blurr. Optimus was the only toy in the set different from the original releases. He came with a translucent red version of the remolded style of Cyber Key previously included with this mold's release during the Cybertron line, featuring a Powerlinx port to activate his punching gimmick.
This release of the Japanese Super Ginrai version of the of Powermaster Optimus Prime was a Toys R Us Japan exclusive black repaint, made to represent the original Convoy/Optimus Prime equipped for a special mission. All of his red and blue plastics were changed to black, his clear blue windows were now tinted red, making his overall colour scheme very reminiscent of the now-familiar 'Black Convoy' colour schemes.

When I was a child in the 1960s, I bought most of my own Lego, using money from paper routes I had from the ages of 7-16. But the items I bought we not ‘kits’. They were small boxes of standard bricks. Each box contained only a single shape and colour, but you could find most of the basic shapes 1×1 or 1×2 or 1×4 or 1×8, 2×2 or 2×3 or 2×4, bevels, doors or windows, if you found the right box. The boxes were only 50 cents, and had an average of 12 bricks per box. That works out out to about 4-5 cents per brick. The kits were expensive, but buying the standard boxes was a lot cheaper, and that is what most people did back then. With my paper route, at the age of 7 I could buy 100 pieces per week using my own money. Name any 7 year old that afford to do that now!
Optimus Prime appears near the end of the Decepticon Campaign. Sam and Mikaela inform Optimus that all the Autobots were defeated by the Decepticons. Optimus proclaims that they sacrificed their lives to protect the Allspark, and their sacrifice will not be in vain. Leaving Sam and Mikaela in a safe place, Optimus faces Megatron, but is defeated. Weakened and damaged, Optimus crawls to reach the Allspark. However, Megatron attacks Optimus with his chain-flail, killing him.
The first Transformers toys were created from two different transforming robot toylines from Takara, the Car-Robots and Micro Change, from the Diaclone and Microman series, respectively. Hasbro acquired the rights to sell them in the United States but, instead of selling them under their original names, they were rebranded as "The Transformers". The first two years consisted primarily of reusing the Car-Robots/Micro Change molds. The earliest toys had some parts made of die-cast metal, which were eventually phased out.
Part of the first wave of Beast Hunters Series 3 Voyager Class toys, Optimus Prime is functionally an upsized copy of his Beast Hunters Series 3 Cyberverse toy, though with certain sculpted details based on his larger toys, the replacement of his ball joints with more robust ratchet joints, the addition of thigh swivels, and various deco differences. As a result, his complexity is lower than in his previous Voyager Class toys, but he ends up being much, much more massive.
Hasbro's subsidiary Milton Bradley (MB) released the toy in Europe in late 1985, following a slight delay due to licensing issues;[13] there are no less than three variants of MB-packaged Optimus Prime, one of them manufactured by Takara and sporting blue feet, the other two manufactured by Joustra as part of a deal with Hasbro/MB, one of them with blue and the other one with red feet;[14]
Ten years after Unicron's defeat, Cybertron was seemimngly at peace, but Optimus still feared another attack from Unicron. Although the Autobot High Council dismissed his fears, a mental link with Primus confirmed that Unicron was still alive. Megatron's disembodied spark, trapped within the chaos-bringer, called out to Prime. Events overtook Prime as Unicron's four Horsemen, Rhinox, Airazor, Cheetor, and Terrorsaur, attacked Cybertron, devastating it. Prime's link with Primus allowed him to upgrade himself into his Energon form and drive them off.

Optimus & Shreddicus were initially exclusive to San Diego Comic-Con 2017, where they sold out. A small portion of the run had been held for future sales: Hasbro Toy Shop put the set up for sale for about five minutes on August 14 before selling out. The remainder was available at HasCon 2017's exclusives booth, but again they burned through the stock very quickly.

For its release in Korea, Hasbro Asia provided a collector coin featuring truck-mode Optimus Prime on one side and "MP-01L" on the other. The coin came mounted on a card featuring lineart of the Autobot leader's head, the stark black design of which could be mistaken for promoting the earlier "Sleep Mode" release. The limited release (and general lack of enthusiasm for the collector coins in Korea) makes this one of the more difficult Masterpiece coins to find.
For some reason: unlike the stock photos (pictured from the right), This Custom Kreon had a slight QC issue to the opaque and transparent helmets: One had two sides sculpted, while the other one has the small flat square sculpt (similar to the details on Hound's helmet) on the right side. Several samples had two different "variants": One with the perfect transparent helmet & a differently-sculpted opaque helmet, while the other one has the opposite. However: later releases fixes the problem by a running change.

Two of his limbs are based on Armada Optimus Prime; one "normal" (Inferno helmet), one pre-Earth-body (Knock Out helmet). The main torso-bot is based on Generation 1 Optimus's original body. Another limb-bot is based on live-action Optimus (Soundwave helmet), and the remaining one (Ironhide helmet)... actually looks to be based on the Optimus-like-but-not-Optimus Micromaster Overload! The heck?
In Transformers Ongoing, which takes place two years after the events of All Hail Megatron, the Autobots would remain on Earth as Prime feared the return of the Decepticons. Unfortunately, this led to the capture of a number of Autobots by Skywatch, including Windcharger, Gears and Prowl. Hot Rod was reformatted into a Pagani Zonda. Already frustrated, he lashed out at Optimus, accusing him of keeping the Autobots on the planet because he needed someone to protect and demanding he be allowed lead a team to rescue Prowl. An admonished Prime agreed to a covert operation, but with Ironhide along to watch over things. While Prowl was freed, it turned out the humans had used him as bait to draw the other Autobots in. However Wheeljack's new shielding protected Hot Rod's team from Skywatch's inhibitors and in a panic the soldiers switched to lethal measures. Hot Rod was targeted and Ironhide was killed protecting him. An enraged Hot Rod turned on the humans, damaging their equipment and machinery.
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