I mean you could argue that they are returning to the way the original Transformer toys worked. Here is an example of the OG Optimus toy. I went to Hasbro's website to see what the most current version of Optimus is that they are selling and I found this. That actually looks surprisingly similar, though I would argue they have gone more of the direction of making the robot look more robotic and the truck a little less truck like but its still a solid middle ground.
The largest Movie Optimus Prime toy (until Revenge of the Fallen, that is), Leader Class Optimus Prime features the most accurate representation yet of the CGI designs' complex transformation sequence, the only difference being the arms which are placed behind the cab while they constitute the hood in the CGI model. He transforms into a heavily-customized Peterbilt 379 conventional extended-hood, and unusually for a mainline figure, he has rubber tires on all his wheels. His Ion Blaster weapon is stored in the rear of the truck's bunk, exposed like an engine block. Though Optimus has no trailer, he has a hole where the fifth wheel (known among fans as a 'hitch') is sculpted in the rear of the truck, should owners find a suitable trailer to use. Due to safety reasons, the tips of his long smokestacks are made of rubber. A switch on top of the cab roof activates horn sounds and window lights.
Long before the internet came along and ruined life as we knew it, Children amused themselves with the most primitive of toys. At the top of the food chain was the yo-yo. Believed to date back to around 500 B.C. in Greece, and even believed to have been used as a crude weapon in the Philippines, the yo-yo (pronounced yo-yo) made a roaring comeback in the 1920s as a toy, and to a lesser extent as a weapon.
In light of this news, if Optimus decided to nonetheless head back directly to Autobot headquarters, his squad returned to find their comrades nearly dead from the poison. But with Ratchet’s help, the antidote was quickly distributed, and the Autobots sprung back to life. Now cured, the Autobots discussed their next course of action; they had to prevent the Decepticons from poisoning the nearby water reservoir.
The "Unicron Trilogy" version of Optimus Prime is a fictional character of this branch of Transformers lore. Appearing in Transformers: Armada, Transformers: Energon and Transformers: Cybertron (known as the aforementioned trilogy), Optimus is the leader of the heroic Autobots. He often converted to his super combat mode. In all three series, Optimus' English voice actor is Garry Chalk, who previously voiced Optimus Primal in Beast Wars and Beast Machines.
Across the assorted continuities of the original Transformers universe, there have been various interpretations of Optimus Prime. One of Prime's most notable characteristics over all continuities his unswaying commitment to leadership by example. The animated series' version of Optimus Prime is depicted as a straightforward, wise, and upbeat battlefield general. Additionally, the animated series' version of Optimus dislikes rap music, putting him at odds with music-loving characters like Blaster and Jazz.
Certainly the most iconic, and most common, leader of the Autobots is Optimus Prime. But the thing about Optimus Prime is that he dies... a lot. And every time he dies, someone has to take his place-- until he’s invariably resurrected in one way or another, that is. In many storylines, including the original animated Transformers: The Movie, it’s Hot Rod who takes over as Rodimus Prime.
The all new 2006-2007 Classics line featured characters from the original series in updated forms. Hot Rod (now called Rodimus due to trademark reasons) was in the first wave of Autobots along with Optimus Prime and Bumblebee. Due to most of the Classics lacking visible Autobot and Decepticon insignias, this figure lacks the distinctive Autobot symbol seen on the chest of all other versions of Hot Rod/Rodimus, to which fan companies have responded to with alternative stickers. His vehicle mode is based on an obscure Japanese Supercar, the Dome Zero, manufactured by DOME Co. Ltd in 1978.[citation needed]
In the movie, he starts out as a 1976 Camaro before modernizing himself. But the 2007 version (the fifth generation of the model) was a concept car-- you couldn’t even buy a new Camaro until 2009. They later switched to the production version for the 2009 sequel Revenge of the Fallen and he was yet another updated model for Dark of the Moon in 2011 (the SS model). In Age of Extinction, he appears both as a 1967 model and another new model of the current version. Finally, back in June, Bay tweeted that in next year’s The Last Knight, Bee would be a custom-built 2016 Camaro. Over the first two years of the relaunch, Chevy sold an astounding 140,000 Camaros and saw a 10% spike in the yellow model, thanks largely to our friend Bumblebee.
The energy of the explosion absorbed by the virus, the Autobots dug themselves out and set about recovering their fellows whom Megatron had used to power the cyber-virus in its early stages. Ironhide passed on a message from Megatron — there was a surprise in store for the Autobot leader. Optimus and some Autobots including Superion sped to San Francisco, where Megatron had unleashed Devastator. As Prime battled Megatron, he took time to save three humans who were threatened by falling debris, only for the humans to turn on him. The defeat of Superion turned the tide of the battle against the Autobots. Prime Directive #4
The lowest priced toys in the Armada line were three-packs of Mini-Cons. Each larger price point consisted of an Autobot or Decepticon who came with a Mini-Con partner. Mini-Cons could be used to unlock a variety of features on each larger robot, such as firing weapons, electronic lights and sounds, or alternate modes. Some three-pack Mini-Cons combined into other forms or had additional features. According to the storyline, Mini-Cons also enhanced the power of other Transformers, giving incentive to collect as many of them as possible.
The first Generation 2 Optimus Prime toy was largely identical in sculpt to the original Generation 1 figure release. While his cab robot retained his original red and blue color scheme, his trailer was recast in black, with the original blue and silver striped sticker replaced with a red and silver one displaying Optimus's name. On the first release of the trailer, the internal components and Roller matched the blue of the cab robot. Later, the internal components were changed to a lighter blue, as was Roller. Another running change followed, making the dark blue of the cab robot match this lighter shade. A bright yellow "Autobot" tampograph was also added to the back of his right leg.
This Walmart-exclusive redeco and retool of the 2010 Transformers toyline "Battle Blades" Optimus Prime toy features the Japanese release's hooks (instead of swords), plus an all-new mouthplate-less, mouthed face. As part of the set's lunar theme, reflections of stars are painted across his vehicle mode sides and on his windshield, with a sharp reflection of Earth's Moon in one of his windows. This time, his Matrix of Leadership is cast in orange plastic.

Like the previous Prime, it is loaded with features, though it ditches the first movie's Automorphing for the new Mech Alive gimmick. When a grey tab on his midriff is pressed, Prime's entire pectoral region "flexes", lights in his chest and eyes glow, and he declares "I am Optimus Prime" in Peter Cullen's voice. For the European release of the figure, to get past the language barrier, the Cullen sound clip is abbreviated to just "Optimus Prime"; in some regions, including Quebec and the UK (but only after a month or two), both versions were made available. A transformation sound effect activates when his torso is transformed, and once Prime is in truck mode, an almost unnoticeable button (a small square located beside the screw for the battery compartment, undocumented in his instructions) is revealed, which activates engine-idling noises.
When IDW Publishing received the rights to the series, author Simon Furman was hired to oversee the line. Furman decided that the Generation 1 continuity "was in need of ... a contemporary restart"[15] so that the comic could retain a modern audience. Furman's revised continuity establishes Optimus Prime as the present-day leader of an Autobot army spread across the galaxy in small units, waging a covert war against teams of Decepticon infiltrators over resource-rich worlds. The Stormbringer miniseries explains that the Transformer homeworld of Cybertron is a dead planet, ravaged by an ancient cataclysm caused by the Autobot-Decepticon War. Prime had been forced to ally with his arch-rival Megatron to end the destruction. In the series, the interference of Jetfire and the Technobots, in a plot organized by the Decepticon Bludgeon, alerts Prime to the possibility that the Cybertronian cataclysm might be re-ignited and spread to other planets. Prime calls in the Wreckers, meeting them on the surface of Cybertron in time to witness the return of the being called Thunderwing, the focal point of the apocalypse. The combined efforts of Prime, the Wreckers, Jetfire, the Predacon-led Decepticons, and a unit of aging Centurion drones are barely enough to render Thunderwing inert.
In late 1993, Hasbro relaunched the Transformers franchise with the Generation 2 line, with production again largely being done by Takara. The subgroups concept was done away with for the first year, but there were no new molds or characters. Generation 2 re-used the molds for many of the characters from the 1984 and 1985 line, but with mostly different color schemes and finishes, as well as different weapons and accessories. Megatron's figure was released later on. As noted previously, Megatron's original alternate mode, or "transformation identity", was a handgun with attachments, but in Generation Two, this was changed to a tank due to safety and security concerns. Most of the 1994 figures were re-releases or recolors of European G1 releases.
×