While the other Autobots searched for the Matrix on Earth, Optimus Prime searched for Vector Sigma, guided through the dangers of the planet's catacombs by the spirit of Alpha Trion. Prime eventually arrived at the computer, only to find his way barred by Cyclonus and Scourge. At that moment, Hot Rod arrived with the Matrix, the same with which Alpha Trion merged, re-energizing it. The Matrix transformed Hot Rod back into Rodimus Prime and, for the first time, the two Primes fought side-by-side and defeated Galvatron.

Each arm features flip-out blades that trigger when a button on the forearm is pressed. Each of these blades has a Cyberglyphic symbol on it. The blades severely restrict Prime's arm articulation when retracted, as they get in the way of the kibble, but as there is very little one can do with Prime's arms without causing the blades to deploy, this is hardly noticeable.
Released as part of the second wave of Clash of the Transformers subline imprint that's exclusive to Toys"R"Us stores, this Power Surge Optimus Prime is a redeco of the toy above, featuring transparent blue parts, white paint applications to the shoulder armor/front truck kibble, his chest, & leg/trailer striping to resemble his larger Power Surge Optimus Prime figure.
Optimus was made available as a mail-away toy in the "Digital Doom on the Highway to Destruction" offer in the US in 1986 to coincide with the Transformers movie in 1986. He cost $21.50 and 5 robot points, and came with a special Movie Edition Certificate and a round sticker that read " Movie . Edition . Transformer" with the Autobot symbol in the middle. (This item is considered rare.)
1. Color diversity: Back in the 80s, most sets were comprised of a few basic colors; red, blue, yellow, white, gray, and black. It was much easier to acquire a “critical mass” of pieces in each color to start building one’s own creations in coherent color schemes. Space, Town, Castle sets all had the same basic colors. Today Lego uses a much wider array of colors in their sets. While this adds a lot of variety and visual appeal to today’s sets, this means that one has to buy a much larger number of sets (or scour bricklink) to get achieve a workable critical mass of pieces in each color. After buying some of the modern sets, I end up with a few dark-blue or lime-green pieces that I don’t really have enough to much with other than use as accent colors. They end up in my misc color bin in the event I decide to build the set they originally came with or sell them off on bricklink.

Thanks to TFW2005 user Fc203, we have some screencaps from what appears to be a stop-motion review video featuring Studio Series Shatter, among other Transformers and non-Transformers toys. The screencaps give us a good look at her robot and alt mode as well as a few poses. Like her partner Dropkick, Shatter only comes with one alt mode. However, that alt mode is her car mode and not her aircraft mode; whereas Dropkick is the opposite. She also seems to be sporting a bit more of a generic head that isn’t quite movie-accurate, but the rest of the figure seems to pay a good deal of homage to her pre-jet mode on-screen model.


What makes LEGO sets seem more expensive now is that the effective piece count seems lower. I remember that in the 80s, each set was full of bricks that were not overtly specialized only to that set. So they were useful for more things. Now the sets usually come with less bricks and plates (things that could be useful everywhere) and bring more things like minifigure accessories, flick fire missiles and other things that are not that useful. Although I think that everything was far worse in the late 1990s/Early 2000s than it is now.
This figure suffers from a design flaw, in that his knee joint pegs are slightly too big for their sockets, and that the resulting connection is so tight that it makes the sockets form stress marks and eventually crack, or even cracking during assembly. The problem can be remedied by simply sanding down the pegs prior to sliding the legs onto the peg.
The most controversial line of this period was the Pretenders. Pretenders consisted of a Transformer contained inside an action figure shell who could "pretend" to be either a human or a monster. Complaints with this line were numerous, including the lack of articulation of the figures (the shells could only move their arms), the simple transformation of the robots within, and their increasing lack of resemblance to any sort of modern recognizable vehicle. Still, despite the complaints, the Pretender line continued through all but the final year of Generation One, with variations such as Beast Pretenders, Monster Pretenders, Classic Pretenders, Mega Pretenders and Ultra Pretenders, each with variations on the theme or increasing levels of complexity.
Scarlett later used the Brainwave Scanner to contact Optimus's spirit and guide him back to the mortal realm. In the physical world, Ultra Magnus challenged Megatron to a duel on a Dyson sphere surrounding the sun. The Autobot god had not ferried Optimus to the afterlife - he had merely repaired Optimus's body by taking it into himself. During the climatic duel, he allowed Optimus to burst free from within his armor. The reborn Optimus punched Megatron into the sun, then turned his attention to reclaiming the stolen Matrix from the Decepticons. After Atlas defeated the maddened Primus, Optimus healed Snake-Eyes' injuries. Optimus then turned his attention to returning Primus/Cybertron to its regular orbit. As the planet left the solar system, he departed aboard the Ark 2 alongside a crew of Joes and Autobots, in the hopes of contacting the Makers. The War Never Ends
The second known version [17] ditched the triplechanging gimmick on the cab and simplified things a good bit. This Powermaster Prime has several distinct characteristics only seen in the second design, such as the wider "block head" and two faux smokestacks on top of either shoulder as opposed to one. Also, in a rather odd twist, this design features a black head and fists for both super and regular modes rather than the traditional blue. It also had yellow eyes in either mode a la the original Optimus Prime.
Optimus Prime's body was hauled out of the Arctic Ocean by the US military. While a terrorist organization run by the enigmatic Lazarus was able to seize control of several of the other Transformers that fell back to Earth, the military worked unsuccessfully to reactivate Prime. They eventually called in Spike Witwicky. Prime Directive #1 Spike was forced by the project chief, General Robert Hallo, to use his piece of the Matrix to reactivate Prime. Functional again, Prime used the Matrix to reactivate more of his fallen comrades. Prime Directive #2

Labeled as a "Triple Changer", Striker Optimus is a redeco and retool of Dark of the Moon Supreme Class Jetwing Optimus Prime, with new weapons. The base figure has most of the same mold changes as Jetwing Optimus Prime (see below), but has been altered further; in particular, the transforming smokestacks and fuel tanks/ion blaster parts have been replaced with retooled regular tanks that now function as mounts for the new accessories. The colors on the toy are darker than Jetwing Optimus, with a different flame deco that extends farther along the sides of the toy. Additionally, two new 5mm holes have been added to the gray hinge behind the cab in order to accommodate the Toys R Us Japan-exclusive battle blade accessories. The "I am Optimus Prime" saying of Buster Optimus Prime has also been replaced with the "We must stop the Decepticons!" saying of 2010 Transformers Optimus Prime, although batteries are not included.
Ultra Magnus is a redeco of the Diaclone "Powered Convoy" figure, itself a redeco and slight retool of "Battle Convoy", the toy that became the original Optimus Prime figure, sporting a new trailer. One of the last few Diaclone toys to be released in the Transformers toyline, Magnus was recolored from the original toy's dark blue, red and black color scheme into a more patriotic red, white and blue, though his chestplate, which was rendered white in his package art followed a more the blue color scheme of his shoulders. He transforms into a Freightliner COE, towing a car-carrier trailer capable of transporting up to four normal-sized Autobot cars. As with Optimus Prime, his cab transforms into a small robot, which can then combine with the trailer to form a "super robot", although all original Generation 1 fiction prior to the 21st century ignored this and simply rendered the super robot as Magnus's default robot form. To facilitate this combination, Magnus sports a slightly longer front axle than Prime, thereby creating tabs on either side of the cab that slide into grooves in the trailer to help lock the small robot into place. He is armed with a rifle sporting two handles that allow either of his robot modes to hold it, and two shoulder-mounted missile launchers, whose spring-loaded firing mechanism was removed for the Hasbro release of the figure.

Two of his limbs are based on Armada Optimus Prime; one "normal" (Inferno helmet), one pre-Earth-body (Knock Out helmet). The main torso-bot is based on Generation 1 Optimus's original body. Another limb-bot is based on live-action Optimus (Soundwave helmet), and the remaining one (Ironhide helmet)... actually looks to be based on the Optimus-like-but-not-Optimus Micromaster Overload! The heck?
Generation 2 Optimus Prime comes with all his original accessories, as well as two major new play features. To increase his arsenal, he is armed with a pair of black missile launchers that fit in his fists and fire red spring-loaded missiles; these launchers were retooled from the G.I. Joe figure Barricade. Secondly, he comes with an electronic "sound and lights module" that can either plug into the front of the trailer (where it resembles the air conditioners used on refrigerated trailers), or hook onto Optimus's back in robot mode (via a new slot sculpted into the cab robot). Unfortunately, the soundbox is heavy enough that doing so can easily overpower Prime's hip joints, causing him to topple backward. The soundbox features a large, vacuum metalized Autobot symbol on its front, and three grey buttons which trigger two flashing red LEDs on either side of the module, and a trio of sound effects: a truck engine noise, a laser gun sound effect and a garbled voice that said "I am Optimus Prime!". The module also features ports on either side into which the missile launchers can peg.
A second die-cast vehicle representing Prime was also part of the Mini Car Collection, this one a red redeco of Majorette toy #291, a Chevrolet K-10 pick-up. To distinguish it from the other Optimus vehicle, this one is randomly allocated the "Super Mode" label, and features an image of the leader in his powered-up form on is hood in addition to the Autobot symbol and series logo.
A redeco of the first Sports Label Convoy, this figure transforms into a white, navy, and grey sneaker. Promotional images for the figure depicted its robot mode as white and aqua-blue, but the finished product was visibly darker, produced in shades of off-white and dark teal. In either coloration, it sure as heck looks like it should be Ultra Magnus, but for whatever reason... it ain't.
Optimus Prime has appeared in numerous video games since the introduction of the Transformers series. He makes a cameo in the 1999 Beast Wars Transmetals video game for Nintendo 64, where he is killed by Megatron at the end of the campaign, showing what would have happened in the Beast Wars series with a Predacon victory. Prime is also one of the playable characters in the 2003 Japan-only Transformers game for the PlayStation 2 and the 2010 Transformers: War for Cybertron. Optimus Prime is also playable in the Hasbro Net Jet Transformers fighting game Transformers Battle Universe. Three versions of Optimus Prime are playable characters, including the first generation incarnation, his incarnations from the 2007 live-action film, and the incarnation from Transformers Animated. In this game, Optimus Primal is also a playable character. He is a regular character in the Nintendo GameCube and PlayStation 2 2003 fighting game DreamMix TV World Fighters. He appeared as a boss in a simple Flash-based video game on the Hasbro web site.[25]
Part of 9th wave of One-Step Changers, and the first of the Combiner Force subline, this Optimus Prime is yet another new mold, with a different transformation scheme (a similar engineering to Age of Extinction's Bumblebee) consisting of pulling the switch on the back (do not hold the truck kibble when you transform him). Like most One-Step Changers, Optimus Prime features limited articulation on the shoulders, and features 5mm compatible hands.
Prime got his own rap segment. He was seen in his "Combat" toy body, waiting for Megatron as he attacked a human subdivision. Prime converted to robot form, blew up Megatron's weapon at point blank range, and slugged it out with him. Apparently emerging victorious, he was next shown sitting next to an identical truck, which kid mistook for the real thing. The real Prime then transformed and picked up the kid, inspecting the human with his cold, lifeless, flashing red optics. Combat Heroes commercial

In the Escalation miniseries, Megatron engages Prime and, boosted by Ore-13, overcomes him. Believing their leader dead, the rest of the Autobots attempt to buy the newly arrived Hot Rod time to collect the clone. Prime, who had transferred his consciousness to a backup memory in his trailer command post, advised them to exploit Ore-13's weakness and assault Megatron all-out, catalyzing the Decepticon leader's Energon supply and crippling him.
Nonetheless, I remain a big fan of Lego and although I think they have somewhat moved away from their roots with the excess of licensed products (and the earlier licensed products were, in my opinion, not very good because they contained too many specialized non-generic pieces that weren’t useful for generic building. But that situation is improved and in particular we have found the Star Wars sets to be of most value for generic building, because they generally have very few really specialized pieces (although to be fair the sets are most useful for building other spaceships, etc).
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