One of the Mini-Con limb-bots (Soundwave helmet) is based on the original movie version of Optimus. The main torso-bot is based on Generation 1 Optimus's original body. Two of his limbs are based on Armada Optimus Prime; one "normal" (Inferno helmet), one pre-Earth-body (Knock Out helmet). And the remaining one (Ironhide helmet)... actually looks to be based on the Optimus-like-but-not-Optimus Micromaster Overload! The heck?

The Transformers toyline was created from toy molds mostly produced by Japanese company Takara in the toylines Car-Robots (Diaclone) and Micro Change (Microman). Other toy molds from other companies such as Bandai were used as well. In 1984, Hasbro bought the distribution rights to the molds and rebranded them as the Transformers for distribution in North America. They approached Marvel Comics to create a backstory with names and short descriptions for each character, most of which were written by Bob Budiansky.


All of the Tiny Titans were sold blindpacked. However: there's a tiny clear window in the back to peek at the item inside, making the task of getting the ones you want easier. Every collectible card included in Tiny Titans has a scannable insignia sticker on it. Scanning the badge unlocks a random amount of Energon "currency" and a randomized bonus power-up item, and can only be scanned once per day. It's honestly quicker and less redundant to say which toys don't have this feature.
The set also includes a redeco of Generations War for Cybertron Optimus Prime figure, which changes the original figure's dark red plastic to a brighter, more vibrant red, changes the gray plastic to a darker charcoal tone, changes the "windows" from gray to nearly black, and replaces most of the original figure's pink-ish red paint details (which were yellow on the redeco from the "Rage over Cybertron" three-pack) to teal.
Optimus Prime has appeared in numerous video games since the introduction of the Transformers series. He makes a cameo in the 1999 Beast Wars Transmetals video game for Nintendo 64, where he is killed by Megatron at the end of the campaign, showing what would have happened in the Beast Wars series with a Predacon victory. Prime is also one of the playable characters in the 2003 Japan-only Transformers game for the PlayStation 2 and the 2010 Transformers: War for Cybertron. Optimus Prime is also playable in the Hasbro Net Jet Transformers fighting game Transformers Battle Universe. Three versions of Optimus Prime are playable characters, including the first generation incarnation, his incarnations from the 2007 live-action film, and the incarnation from Transformers Animated. In this game, Optimus Primal is also a playable character. He is a regular character in the Nintendo GameCube and PlayStation 2 2003 fighting game DreamMix TV World Fighters. He appeared as a boss in a simple Flash-based video game on the Hasbro web site.[25]
A Voyager-class two pack of Classics Optimus Prime, representing the Generation 1 version of the character, and a redeco of Age of Extinction Evasion Optimus Prime representing the Movie character (The deco patterns is most likely to emulate the character's design in 2007, with vague results). Like Rusty Optimus Prime (seen below), he features flames on his vehicle mode doors.
Hasbro has had a bit of a strange relationship with Bumblebee. In the early days (we’re talking mid-’80s) he was hugely popular, both on the TV show and as a toy, and Hasbro was sure to capitalize on that. As a result, there were more different Bumblebee toys during that time and into the early ‘90s than for any other Transformer. Of course, the alternate Goldbug version helped boost the number of toys they could make.

Upon witnessing the incredible power of a lightning storm for the first time, Optimus Prime had Sparkplug Witwicky explain the phenomenon to him. Intrigued by the potential of lightning, Prime put Huffer and Gears to work finding a way to harness its energy, so they could use it to aid in the rebuilding of their spaceship. Huffer constructed a giant lightning rod, and Optimus Prime and the Autobots gathered to watch its first test. They were shocked, however, when a fleet of battered, damaged Decepticons flew out of the mountain housing the antenna and off into the night. The evil robots had attempted to discover the device's secrets and been seriously electrocuted! Once the lightning rod had been checked, Prime vowed to make the lightning-harnessing technology the Autobots' gift to Earth once they had left the planet. Autobots' Lightning Strike
Bumblebee - The Transformers live action film franchise's latest installment is out, with Bumblebee hitting theaters last week. The Seibertron.com Twincast / Podcast brings you its review of the movie, with one of its regular podcasters Jon Bailey bringing his insights after providing the voice acting talents for Soundwave and Shockwave in the film. Along with this insider perspective, the cast discusses each significant part of the movie itself, beginning with the "Generation One" inspired opening scene on Cybertron. The new human and robot characters presented in the Earth based adventures are also reflected on, with the cast agreeing that this latest movie is a measurable tonal departure from the approach of previous films in the franchise. After talking through the entire movie's plot and characterizations, speculation about what comes next for Travis Knight, Michael Bay, and the Transformers live action movies comes next. A quick chat about the movie's tie-in toyline follows, and the show concludes with a quick round of holiday season bragging rights about the cast's Transformers related gifts.
Beast Wars: Transformers had to be renamed in some countries, particularly Canada, because of concern over the word "war" in the title. So, in some countries, it was released under the title Beasties. Long-time Transformers fans noticed the prominence of the words "Beast Wars" over "Transformers", the latter appearing in small type under the former. The Transformers' fan base splintered into two groups as a direct result, with the one enjoying Beast Wars for what it was and the other refusing to accept it as official canon in the Transformers mythology.
While Beast Machines was still running in Canada, Japan's Takara made a bid to return to the familiar vehicle-transforming robots concept. In 2000, Car Robots was released. This line was brought by Hasbro to America as the Robots In Disguise series, and featured the Autobots facing off against the Predacons. This series is usually regarded by most as filler while Hasbro contemplated the next direction for Transformers. However most fans of Transformers recognise that most if not all of the toys released from this line were of excellent quality (with the Optimus Prime and Ultra Magnus figures gaining considerable praise), combining the ball-joint articulation with detailed, well painted alternate modes.
A highly CG-accurate sculpt of Optimus Prime's head with a built in voice-changer. It also has several sound effects and quotes from the movie. The voice-changer has three settings, giving more accurate alteration of the user's voice (though this is still debatable; most voice changing technology is pretty crummy, at least in toys). Much like the Ultimate Bumblebee figure, this toy will hate your wallet too. While it only costs 30 bucks, if it's anything like another Hasbro voice changer, it will suck batteries up like they were some kind of square candy holder.

While Transformers ended poorly for the US market, the same can not be said for the UK, Canada, and Japan markets as they went on to produce their own continuing series between 1991 and 1993, despite the UK market in particular missing a substantial amount of figures prominent in the comics and animated series throughout the line's run. Each country produced their own continuity. The UK and Canada continued with new Action Master figures and introduced the Turbo Masters and Predators. Japan continued with the Micromasters concept.
In robot mode, Voyager class Optimus Prime is proportionally more accurate to his CGI design than the leader class toy and has a more accurate headsculpt, but due to the aforementioned lessened complexity significant sacrifices had to be made, such as "cheats" to the transformation sequence, to achieve this and thus he is overall less accurate than he initially appears. In addition to previously mentioned changes, he carries much of the truck's front hood, grill and fenders on his back like a backpack. However, he maintains a superb level of articulation and posability.
Alerted by Bumblebee of Megatron's latest plan, Optimus Prime led the mission on Wheeljack's ship to foil them. He sent Bumblebee on an underwater scouting mission, and took part in a pitched battle that ended in the Decepticon's being defeated. Search for Treasure Under the Sea When Rumble dropped rocks on the Autobots, Optimus used Roller to eliminate most of them. Unfortunately he was forced to surrender when he saw the other Autobots had been captured by the Decepticons, and was placed in a special Autobot prison. Luckily Bumblebee remained free, and after he'd rescued the others, Optimus wrapped Megatron up with an iron bar. Bumblebee to the Rescue!
Released by TakaraTomy as part of a 2010 promotion honoring the "future era" of the original cartoon (which was set in 2010 in Japanese continuity, you see!), this exceptionally morbid re-release of the Masterpiece Convoy figure recolors the Autobot leader in blacks and greys, representing his dead body from The Transformers: The Movie—but don't worry, kids, it's actually a "sleep mode", according to the figure's name! Limited to 2010 pieces in Japan (see what they did there?), it comes with all its customary accessories, including the Perfect Edition trailer, redecoed where appropriate: the trailer itself has become translucent, its energon-axe is now transparent grey, and Megatron, in another movie homage, is rendered in translucent purple, evoking the scene depicting his transformation into Galvatron. The figure was also released in other parts of Asia as a limited edition of 2010 as well, combined with the Japanese edition for 4020 total. The Japanese version denotes "Serial Number in Japan: ####/2010" on its bio card with the number out of 2010, while the Asian version denotes "C1 - ####/2010" with the number out of 2010 on its bio card.

This unusual iteration of Optimus Prime is a redeco of Beast Wars 10th Anniversary Optimus Primal, transforming into a robotic gorilla in the pseudo-technorganic-looking style of the other Jungle Planet toys. He comes with a Jungle Planet Cyber Key stamped with the code d7s9, which plugs into his flying surfboard accessory to reveal a spring-loaded missile launcher. His brown and cream deco seems inspired by Donkey Kong, while the scar over his beast mode eye seems intended to homage Peter Jackson's King Kong.
Optimus Prime has a wide range of articulation for a relatively bulky figure. He has ratcheting joints in his shoulders, elbows, hips and knees, with swivel joints and ball joints supporting them in his biceps, lower knee joints and ankles. Again, unusually for a mainline figure, especially at the Leader pricepoint, his hands have individually articulated fingers and thumbs, but no wrists.
Nonetheless, I remain a big fan of Lego and although I think they have somewhat moved away from their roots with the excess of licensed products (and the earlier licensed products were, in my opinion, not very good because they contained too many specialized non-generic pieces that weren’t useful for generic building. But that situation is improved and in particular we have found the Star Wars sets to be of most value for generic building, because they generally have very few really specialized pieces (although to be fair the sets are most useful for building other spaceships, etc).
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