Optimus was made available as a mail-away toy in the "Digital Doom on the Highway to Destruction" offer in the US in 1986 to coincide with the Transformers movie in 1986. He cost $21.50 and 5 robot points, and came with a special Movie Edition Certificate and a round sticker that read " Movie . Edition . Transformer" with the Autobot symbol in the middle. (This item is considered rare.)
After step 5, the instructions did not mention that you should fold back the shoulder panels to form the sleeper part until the 11th step. Care must be taken while transforming the legs: the small peg located on the lower leg can be snapped off due to the peg being slightly thick to accommodate with the hole. Also, take note that Optimus Prime cannot wield 5mm weapons with longer posts, as the way that his pinky finger is molded prevents the post from pegging down through his hands. Also, take note that the legs' sculpted small rectangle peg (the one that locks the robot mode legs in place) is prone to warping if care is not taken during transformation.
His main gimmicks, however, are the two large, blue-and-white mini-guns hidden in his back/hood, which can deploy and "weaponize" either mode. When deployed, the mini-guns swing out from his back/hood and spin, while a red LED inside his torso lights up briefly. The mini-guns swing down to the sides of his head in robot mode, and can also be deployed in vehicle mode when one manually opens the grille. Pushing down on the red lever on the center his torso (in either mode) briefly lights up the LED again and swings the mini-guns back into their hiding places.
Starscream was my first transformer. I got it because my parents bribed me to climb to the top of the pole in the gym class. Shit was scary. Do they even make kids do that anymore? Anyway, I protected that with my life. Sorry to hear about yours. I didn't have siblings at the time but within a few years I did have some who pretty much did destroy everything they touched. Luckily by then I was a teenager and figured out good hiding places for important stuff.
The main build of the set is a massive vehicle based on Optimus's truck cab, capable of seating a single Kreon in the driver's seat. Pushing the trailer-hitch on the back end towards the cab opens up the front grill, revealing a huge spring-loaded rocket launcher with rubber-tipped projectile. The cab can also stow the included stasis pod ussed to lock away the baddies.
This Voyager-sized Optimus Prime is an all new mold (with a similar transformation scheme to Age of Extinction Voyager Class Galvatron, notably the shoulders, rooftop backpack, and the leg/wheels combo) based on his Leader Class figure. He features a similar but different transformation scheme, which results in a somewhat clean robot mode, although most of his vehicle kibble hangs on his back. He also features the sword & the shield based on his final design in the movie, albeit the sword being painted similarly to the Armor Knight Optimus Prime's sword. His Sword can store underneath his Vehicle mode or his robot mode backpack, while the shield can be stored on the truck's fifth wheel hitch, which can also tow the trailer included from the Japanese exclusive Mechtech Voyager. Although the pectoral armor can be slightly pushed up a little bit further, the pieces have to actually stop at where the rectangular pegholes are located.
Take one part bicycle, two pages out of the Flintstones automobile design book and one hard-spoiled child and you have a pedal car. It seems like a really fun idea in theory but, in actuality, the single-speed gearing of a bike mixed with the weight of the metal shell, seats and wheels meant operation of the thing bordered on child labor. Still, the pedal car remained very sought after for generations to come.

These include two large guns, patterned after the new weapons included with the G2 version of the classic Optimus Prime toy, which can be attached to the trailer in a similar fashion to those of Powermaster Prime. Also included are two additional (blue) Prime heads, sculpted explicitly in the style of Generation 2 comic artist Derek Yaniger's interpretation of Prime, especially as seen on the cover of the first issue, one pristine and the other battle-damaged.

EZ Collection Gum Convoy is another redeco of Generations Legends Class Motorbreath, featuring the retooled parts, but this time omitting the sword. He is decoed once again in his Generation 2 colors (see above), with the black legs, but uses metallic red plastic, and is coated in metallic red, blue, and black paint. As per the toyline's name, he comes with a yellow candy-shelled piece of lemony-flavored gum.
With the failure of the Generation 2 series, Hasbro and Takara decided the franchise needed an overhaul. They went in a new direction and a new beginning. While there had been Transformers that change into robotic animals, the premise of the new line was that all figures would transform into animals with realistic appearances. The Beast Wars toy line was launched in the autumn of 1995, and Mainframe Entertainment produced a computer-generated imagery, or CGI, animated series program to tie in with the new toy line. A fresh idea coupled with a TV series program with strong stories assured this series the success Hasbro and Takara needed, as this series was a giant hit in international markets as well as in Takara's home market, Japan.
The Japanese release of Powermaster Optimus Prime actually represented a new character named Ginrai, and featured several retools: the cab featured die-cast metal, shortened smokestacks, vacuum-metalized plastic and clear blue windows, while the trailer was given retractable super robot fists. This Japanese version was eventually issued by Hasbro in 2003 as part of the Commemorative Series collection (see below).
Two custom-made pieces (presented in robot and vehicle mode) by the Hasbro Transformers team as the grand prize for G4TV and Jumpcut's contest for fans to remix selected Transformers clips. Won by TFW2005.com member James Zahn, this one-of-a-kind (well, two-of-a-kind) piece is an almost fully vacuum-metallized Leader-class Optimus Prime in red, silver and blue (based heavily upon Generation 1 Optimus Prime), presented with a custom display base with an embossed silver Autobot insignia and a perspex display case.

This highly accurate model kit of Optimus Prime is a Japanese exclusive. It is extremely possible, and comes with his two swords that can be mounted either on his fore-arm, or the hand can be removed and it placed in the wrist via ball joint. His appearance is based on his Dark of the Moon look, as it his "Abbs". The head can be made either with the face-plate on or the face-plate of which reveals a detailed face. Interestingly though, he doesn't come with any of the guns he uses in the films, though it is thought he can hold Buster Prime's gun.
Sold at the rather exorbitant price of $75, this re-release of the original Generation 1 Optimus Prime toy is actually one of the most visually different from the other "straight" reissues of the mold, despite Hasbro's assurance that this is the toy you had as a kid. Positively anemic in comparison with the original toy, this Prime's red parts are visibly paler than usual, while his blue parts are much lighter (although the version released at Canadian retail reportedly sports a deeper shade of red again). This shade of blue extends to both Roller (a lighter blue than his traditional dark shade, yet darker than the lightest the figure has been in its history) and the internal workings of his Combat Deck, which is itself a much flatter shade of light grey, compared to its normal dark, swirled metallic silver color. In addition, the toy features the now-customary shortened smokestacks, and the elongated missiles seen on the Commemorative Series release. While all reissues of the Prime mold since 2003 have used the original thick-barreled mold for his ion blaster, this version includes the slender sculpt instead.
In Spotlight: Doubledealer, Hot Rod's search was interrupted by Dealer's arrival on Earth, with orders for Hot Rod: find the Magnificence and use it to learn what they could about the Expansion. Hot Rod took Dealer to his hiding spot, which turned out to be the planet where they first found the device. As Dealer and Hot Rod closed on the Magnificence, he went over his first visit to the planet in his mind, and how things could have gone so wrong. Eventually he began to have suspicions, and upon locating the Magnificence, asked it the question that haunted him: had Dealer betrayed him? Sadly, it revealed the truth, and Hot Rod was forced to kill Dealer as the traitor attacked. Looking down on his remains, Hot Rod realized the truth had been staring him in the face, he just had not wanted to accept it. He then used the Magnificence to find out all he could about the Expansion, and relayed the information to the Autobots.
The toy that would ultimately end up as the original Optimus Prime toy was originally released in August 1983 as No.17 Battle Convoy from Takara's Diaclone Car Robo toyline in Japan. In 1984, Joustra released their own version (still with Diaclone sticker on the trailer) as part of their Diaclone line in Europe, either simply called Truck (according to the pack-in catalog) or Diaclone (in the pack-in comic). It's possible that GiG also released a version called Camion Convoy as part of their Trasformer line in Italy, but to this day no packaged sample has surfaced.
Part of the first wave of TakaraTomy Lost Age: Movie Advanced toys, this Japanese-exclusive redeco of 2007 Transformers Protoform Optimus Prime is given a Generation 1-styled color scheme (which is also based on his appearances in IDW's Transformers: Foundation comic-book mini-series). Protoform Optimus Prime transforms into his "entry" mode. This mode somewhat resembles a cybertronic truck, with false wheels sculpted onto the sides, and Optimus Prime's trademark windows in front. His now-blue flame decoration piece fits to the back of the "vehicle", creating the illusion of a flaming comet's tail (Not sure if this was mean to represent his jetpack blast effect or his atmospheric entry heat effect, which is for no reason: entirely blue instead of hot red). The bottom of the vehicle has small wheels to roll the toy across smooth surfaces.
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