Realizing that the planet is dying, Optimus orders a mass evacuation of all Autobot cities, but many transport ships are destroyed by the Decepticon satellite Trypticon, under orders from Megatron that no one shall leave the planet. He orders the Aerialbots Jetfire, Silverbolt and Air Raid to fly and destroy Trypticon. The aerial trio manages to destroy Trypticon's jet pack and send the Decepticon behemoth crashing into Cybertron, where Optimus Prime and the Autobots band together to narrowly defeat him, sending him plunging into a pool of raw energon. Optimus and the remaining Autobots volunteer to stay and defend Cybertron from Megatron for as long as possible while the rest evacuate the planet. He commissions a massive vessel known as the Ark to transport the remaining Autobots into space when the time comes.

This release of Buster Optimus Prime was susceptible to a paint scraping issue on the silver painted slide-out barrel of his blaster. This problem was fixed for the DOTM Re-release by relocating the silver paint app from the barrel to the inside wall of an exposed gas tank that had been previously left as unpainted grey plastic. The black paint app on the barrel was left unchanged.
After the events of Transformers Animated the Stunticons set up a Stunt Convoy show in the city of Kaon and use it as cover to attempt to break Megatron out of his detention at Trypticon. Their attempts are thwarted thanks to the efforts of Cheetor, Optimus Prime, and Sideswipe. The Stunticons are placed in detention with Megatron and an attempt to rescue them was made by the Decepticons Blot, Mindwipe, Oil Slick, Scalpel, Sky-Byte, and Strika.[143]
Prime invited Wataru to visit the Autobots' subterranean base, and he gave the boy a personal tour as he carried the injured Bumblebee to the infirmary. Telling him the story of the Energon Cube and the Autobots' coming to Earth, Prime showed Wataru the large chunk of the cube that they had managed to recover. He then turned his attention to repairing Bumblebee's wounds, and as such, did not notice Wataru reaching out to touch the cube sliver. A bizarre energy discharge resulted that not only showed the Autobots images of Another Time & Place, but also healed both Autobots' wounds. Prime dived at Wataru and hauled him away from the shard, returning things to normal, but leaving Prime with grave concerns over what the strange occurrence might mean. Kingdom of Giants
After a long period of stalemate, Prime grew frustrated at the lack of progress his troops were making against Megatron's forces. To remedy the situation, he ordered the creation of several new Transformers who would be perfectly adapted for combat on Earth. The first among these was Pirhana. Piranha's The Official Transformers: Generation 2 Annual profile But one of the Autobots' great victories came not through superior numbers or firepower, but trickery and cunning. As part of a plan devised by Optimus Prime's new second-in-command Prowl, the Autobots allowed Starscream to "overhear" that they had uncovered an ancient Cybertronian ship with the means to return to Cybertron. They then stationed themselves around the vessel, atop of Table Mountain in Africa, and awaited the inevitable Decepticon attack over its possession. Optimus met Megatron in battle, but ordered his troops to withdraw after a brief skirmish, declaring the Decepticons too powerful to hold back. Once the Decepticons claimed their prized and entered the ship, they found themselves locked inside it. The ship then shot up away from the planet, leaving the Decepticons without the means to control it. Though the Autobots knew this wouldn't rid them permanently of the Decepticons, they were satisfied with a brief period of calm while they were off-world. Day of the Decepticons
Part of the first wave of the "Mini-Con Weaponizers" subline imprint, this One-Step Changer figure of Optimus Prime is a new sculpt. In the Robots in Disguise mobile game, it was identified alternatively as an "Advanced One-Step" or "Evolved One-Step" figure depending on the user's region, but on the toy's packaging, no such modifiers are featured, and it is available as part of the regular One-Step Changer assortment. This figure shares most of its engineering with One-Step Fracture.
The TakaraTomy version of Premium Series Optimus Prime has a considerably different deco to Hasbro's release. Similar to the unique chrome Optimus Prime, Optimus Prime Battle Mode features vacuum-metallized parts for nearly all of the silver truck parts, for a greater resemblance to the polished chrome on the real prop trucks. Unfortunately, as his feet are the front fenders and grill, this will likely lead to chipping. In robot mode he retains several decos that were removed from Hasbro's Premium Optimus Prime for cost reasons, such as the blue and gold decos on his thighs. Finally, the flip-out energy sword is coloured gold to reflect its "powered up" appearance.
At BotCon 2005, Hideaki Yoke revealed that Optimus Prime (or more accurately, Diaclone Battle Convoy) was not designed by a single person, but rather a team of Takara designers as the one who was originally assigned the job had fallen behind. It is said that a young Shoji Kawamori was also a member of this team at some point, who would design THS-02 Convoy over 20 years later. The patent for the toy, however, lists Hiroyuki Obara as the designer.
In an amusing (but glaring) example of poor quality control in a Takara product, the back of the packaging features a small amount of Engrish, notably the word "kinetic" being written as "Kinetick". The bio also mentions the elemental metal as the "Cyber-Matter" living metal, which is used for the Aligned continuity family. Oddly, TakaraTomy's stock photo of the robot mode figure was later used as a cutout "battle figure" included with Telebi Magazine's Burning Megatron.
This Trailer is identical to the original BeCool Trailer other than the stickers, and now comes with the trailer/launcher accessory from Bot Shots redecoed in blue with red stripes. While the vehicle mode sticker in his chest remains, the hand-holding and sleeping ones have been replaced by pictures of the launcher: one in base mode and one in trailer mode. He also comes with a sticker sheet for decorating the Trailer Base.
The 5-inch Power series is a little more complex (4-9 steps) and a little more spoilery, because it’s the first hint we’ve gotten that Megatron might be a part of the Transformers: Bumblebee movie. Sporting a similar form to previous versions, his alt mode is a 4-track Cybertronian tank (with the usual very conspicuous face…funny how a lazy toy design decision from the first movie has now become cannon). The Power series also has the only Dropkick Energon Igniters toy. You can use the cores sold with the Power Plus and Nitro toys to unlock special features. Camaro ‘Bee and Hot Rod round out this series.

Alternators Optimus Prime transforms into an accurate, fully-licensed 1:24th scale Dodge Ram SRT-10. The vehicle mode features rubber tires, functional steering, opening hood, tail gate and doors with a detailed cabin interior. His robot mode body sculpt details are based upon the 20th Anniversary Optimus Prime toy. However, his headsculpt is based upon Powermaster Optimus Prime. He is armed with a small pistol that is formed from his engine.


Ten years after Unicron's defeat, Cybertron was seemimngly at peace, but Optimus still feared another attack from Unicron. Although the Autobot High Council dismissed his fears, a mental link with Primus confirmed that Unicron was still alive. Megatron's disembodied spark, trapped within the chaos-bringer, called out to Prime. Events overtook Prime as Unicron's four Horsemen, Rhinox, Airazor, Cheetor, and Terrorsaur, attacked Cybertron, devastating it. Prime's link with Primus allowed him to upgrade himself into his Energon form and drive them off.
This Classics Optimus Prime is a smaller, deluxe-class toy bearing a greater resemblance to the original G1 toy. He was only available in a special Versus pack with a similarly unique Classics Megatron toy and later the FAB version of the 2007 movie Prime. Later releases of this toy had him individually packed in some European countries. His vehicle mode and robot mode is based upon the original toy, but due to limitations in design, budget and gimmick, does not succeed very well. His thighs cannot collapse into his lower legs, meaning they are exposed in vehicle mode, as is his head. Although to be fair, you wouldn't really notice the leg thing if he had a trailer. But, he is greatly articulated.
This small version of Energon Optimus Prime was released by Kabaya as part of their DX Transformers line of candy toys. Prime transforms in the same manner as the larger Energon figures do, though his arms have to be removed at the shoulder and reinserted into his back to form truck mode. The Prime Force were sold in a separate set in the DX Transformers series, and can combine with Prime to form his Super Mode. Optimus came with a stick of gum.
Revenge of the Fallen Legends class Optimus Prime is an all-new, much more accurate mold compared to the 2007 Legends class Prime, having a much greater accuracy in both robot and vehicle mode. In particular, his vehicle mode isn't inexplicably missing one smokestack like the 2007 toy. It should be noted that he was molded in only one paintable plastic color, with red and blue deco patterns decked on it. The top of the truck's bunk (ending up on his back in robot mode) has a slot to combine with Jetfire. For some reason, this isn't mentioned in the instructions, though they're hardly needed.
Takara's release of Optimus Prime the following year made a few changes, noticeably replacing the gold paint and plastic of the Hasbro toy with bright yellow and much brighter gold. The deco has been tweaked to be a bit closer to the original prototype glimpsed in early catalogs, with yellow added back to cab Prime's feet and the cab grill painted silver, and the Super Mode's waist getting much more paint. This version of the figure was never burdened with the mobility-inhibiting shoulder tabs. Completing the Super Mode combination triggered a new clip of Prime shouting "Convoy, ready for battle!" in Japanese instead of generic mechanical sounds. Late in the run, JUSCO stores offered this toy with blind-packed "Space Galaxy" versions of the individual Destruction Mini-Con Team members, one toy per box.
This Japanese-exclusive reissue of the original Generation 1 Optimus Prime figure featured tinted blue windows, like those sported by the "Goodbye Convoy" edition of the toy, as well as show-accurate blue eyes. Prime came with all his original accessories, including both versions of his rifle, as well as a new die-cast metal Matrix of Leadership accessory, which could be looped around his neck on a removable chain. Additionally, the set included a show-accurate redeco of the Action Master Optimus Prime figure, a sheet of Autobot insignia stickers of varying sizes, and a mouse pad decorated with the Autobot symbol.

The largest Movie Optimus Prime toy (until Revenge of the Fallen, that is), Leader Class Optimus Prime features the most accurate representation yet of the CGI designs' complex transformation sequence, the only difference being the arms which are placed behind the cab while they constitute the hood in the CGI model. He transforms into a heavily-customized Peterbilt 379 conventional extended-hood, and unusually for a mainline figure, he has rubber tires on all his wheels. His Ion Blaster weapon is stored in the rear of the truck's bunk, exposed like an engine block. Though Optimus has no trailer, he has a hole where the fifth wheel (known among fans as a 'hitch') is sculpted in the rear of the truck, should owners find a suitable trailer to use. Due to safety reasons, the tips of his long smokestacks are made of rubber. A switch on top of the cab roof activates horn sounds and window lights.
A Toys "R" Us exclusive, the U.S. release of Masterpiece Rodimus Convoy by Hasbro does not come with the detachable trailer, but is offered with his Targetmaster partner Offshoot (renamed from Firebolt due to trademark issues) and a remold of Optimus Prime's Matrix of Leadership, which does not fit in his chest. Like the Takara Tomy version, a smaller Matrix that fits in his chest is included. While the Japanese version is based on the animation design, the Hasbro redeco bears a closer resemblance to the original G1 toy. Parts of the figure's legs have been re-engineered after owners of the Japanese version complained that the hinges of the leg armor easily broke off. Masterpiece Rodimus Prime was first offered at the 2011 San Diego Comic-Con International.
When Optimus and Hound eventually made their way there, they found that C-81 and his gang of criminals had escaped prison and were combating the Waruder soldiers responsible for the planetary shutdown. Optimus mistakenly assumed that C-81 and his goons were there on purpose, and joined them in fending off the invaders. They were soon joined by Burn Out and Lift-Ticket, who informed the Cybertronians that they had stumbled across the Waruders' main hive. Lift-Ticket explained the Waruders could be repelled if he managed to get a sample of the hive's venom. Optimus was willing to go along with Lift-Ticket's dangerous plan, despite C-81's skepticism. However, the battle came to an end when C-81 managed to grab a hold of the Waruders' leader, and forced the bug into peaceful negotiations. Optimus agreed to allow the Waruders to migrate to another Cybertron via C-81's illegal interuniversal gate, in exchange for a venom sample that would be used to create an anti-toxin to revive the TransTech. The General nonetheless impounded C-81's gate afterwards, though he did let the criminals "slip away" as thanks for their part in thwarting the Waruder invasion.
Thanks to the efforts of fellow Seibertron user, Sabrblade, we now have pictures of the box that Entertainment Earth's Transformers Select Series exclusive Red Swoop will be shipped in when he's available this March! As you can tell from the images it's just an ordinary brown box... But a brown box with symbols relating to the Power of the Primes line! You can see all the Prime symbols present and Cybertronian writing, which according to Sabrblade, when translated says: - Read More
So as a MOC builder, I have found that I tend to design MOCs on LDD and acquire parts as needed for each MOC from bricklink. I now tend to pass on licensed themes. I am especially turned off by the rehashing of many of the Star Wars vehicles. Sets that I buy tend to be Creator sets for my kids or the occasional “special edition” set that appeals to me such as the Sopwith Camel set.
His main gimmicks, however, are the two large, blue-and-white mini-guns hidden in his back/hood, which can deploy and "weaponize" either mode. When deployed, the mini-guns swing out from his back/hood and spin, while a red LED inside his torso lights up briefly. The mini-guns swing down to the sides of his head in robot mode, and can also be deployed in vehicle mode when one manually opens the grille. Pushing down on the red lever on the center his torso (in either mode) briefly lights up the LED again and swings the mini-guns back into their hiding places.
It may be that the price of an individual brick has gone down over time, but what does it matter if the size of the bricks has decreased overtime? Sure, the average number of pieces in a set has increased, but how many of those pieces are tiny details? To answer this question, I compiled all the weight data on brickset.com and compared the sets by their price per gram in a similar fashion to how I compared them by price of piece. Below is the chart of my results (prices are in US dollars).
Prime is loaded with a ridiculous number of features and accessories. The robot itself is highly poseable, and both the smokestacks on Prime's shoulders and the fuel tanks on his legs can be rotated forward to act as guns, even featuring sculpted detail to this effect. As ever, he comes with a trailer that opens up into his crazy-detailed Combat Deck, featuring more action features than ever before. In trailer mode alone, it features a flip-down support stand so it can stand alone, a spring-loaded pop-out ramp instead of a fold-down one, and when the trailer is split for transformation, the traditional support legs underneath automatically swing out into place. The trailer houses most of Prime's accessories, including his ion blaster (with a moveable ammo clip to allow for multiple poses) and energon-axe, as well as his classic gas pump accessory, now with a poseable wire instead of a rubber hose. Two fold-out compartments provide storage space for six of Prime's interchangeable fists, while the other two remain attached the robot: two clenched, two open, a pointing right fist, a tilted left fist (for holding the ion blaster's ammo clip), and two fists with slots to grip the miniscule Matrix of Leadership that fits in a tiny chamber in Prime's chest. The Combat Deck's artillery robot features two flip-out handles that Prime can grip as if aiming the drone's guns, and Roller is also included, with three different 3mm ports to hold Prime's gun and gas pump. Lastly, Prime comes with a rocket pack like those used by the Autobots in such Generation 1 cartoon episodes as "Dinobot Island", and a stand shaped like the Autobot insignia that allows him to be displayed in mid-air, as if in flight. The rocket pack also has 3mm ports for Prime's weapons, and stores on the front of the trailer in vehicle mode.
He reappeared in the third crossover, where he apparently acted as Optimus Prime's right-hand man. Putting a team together to look for the missing team that had journeyed to Earth (who had been captured by Serpentor and the Decepticons), he would later lead the combined G.I. Joe/Autobot force that rescued Optimus Prime. In contrast to his usual "youthful rookie" portrayal here Hot Rod seems to be in a high command position, outranking Ultra Magnus, Prowl and Ironhide among others. However, by the fourth crossover Hot Rod is forced to wait on Cybertron under Magnus's command as Optimus Prime journeys to Earth.
Certainly the most iconic, and most common, leader of the Autobots is Optimus Prime. But the thing about Optimus Prime is that he dies... a lot. And every time he dies, someone has to take his place-- until he’s invariably resurrected in one way or another, that is. In many storylines, including the original animated Transformers: The Movie, it’s Hot Rod who takes over as Rodimus Prime.

A redeco of Deluxe Earth Mode Optimus Prime with the jet pack attachments and a smaller version of Ultra Magnus' Mass Hammer, as seen in the "Endgame" series finale. The Wingblade attachments are also compatible with Voyager Optimus Prime. The figure never saw a release in the U.S. market due to Hasbro's decision to cancel the toy line, but a variation of it was made available in Japan.[155]
In the event that Windcharger successfully turned the Decepticons’ forcefield off, reinforcements burst into the base just as Megatron was strike Optimus from behind. A wayward shot from Megatron then revealed the location of the gravity gun to the Autobots. Optimus ordered his troops to charge the weapon. Hook caught Optimus in the gravity gun’s sights, and sent the Autobot leader floating upwards.
Rodimus Prime/Minor is a character who appeared in season 3 of the Transformers Animated series. He is a homage to the Generation 1 version of the character Hot Rod.[17] He wields an energon bow-and-arrow weapon of his own design.[18] On March 31, 2009, Derrick J. Wyatt, lead Transformers Animated Character Designer posted an image of Rodimus' vehicle mode, which is described as a futuristic muscle car that is mostly based on a 2008 Dodge Challenger with some elements of a 1969 Ferrari Daytona. This was revealed at the 2009 BotCon where Hasbro released an action figure of Rodimus Minor. It showed that the 2008 Dodge Challenger parts of Rodimus' vehicle mode were mostly based on the back, top, and sides of the vehicle, while the 1969 Ferrari Daytona parts were found in the front of the vehicle, most notably, the headlights.
For many, it may seems that the advent of licensed sets3 correlates with the perceived increase in prices. The 1990s and before were a nostalgic heyday of affordable LEGO sets. This is not quite true. Below is a chart that compares the price per piece of licensed sets and unlicensed sets starting in 1999. 1999 is the first year that LEGO had major licensed themes.
Nonetheless, I remain a big fan of Lego and although I think they have somewhat moved away from their roots with the excess of licensed products (and the earlier licensed products were, in my opinion, not very good because they contained too many specialized non-generic pieces that weren’t useful for generic building. But that situation is improved and in particular we have found the Star Wars sets to be of most value for generic building, because they generally have very few really specialized pieces (although to be fair the sets are most useful for building other spaceships, etc).
×